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UncleChris
12-10-2005, 02:40 AM
One of my Ham buddies was telling me about the Ham Radio Wilderness Protocol after we were discussing Boonie trips to the backcountry.

I thought this might be of interest to the group.



Wilderness Monitoring Protocol

The purpose of this initiative is to offer stations outside repeater range an opportunity to be heard when it is needed the most!

The Wilderness Protocol suggests radio operators (Amateur service) should monitor standard simplex channels at specific times in case of Emergency or priority calls.

The primary frequency monitored is 146.52 MHz; secondarily or alternatively 52.525, 223.5, 446.0 and 1294.5 MHz respectively. The idea is to allow communications between hams that are hiking or backpacking in uninhabited areas, outside repeater range an alternative opportunity to be heard.

NOTE- This is NOT just for hikers, back packers, or similar situations....it is for ANYONE to use at ANYTIME...that you need assistance!

Recommended Use of "Wilderness Protocol"

Monitor the PRIMARY- 146.520 and any or all of the SECONDARY FREQUENCIES.(52.525, 223.500, 446.00, 1294.500)

MONITOR TIMING- Every 3 hours from 0700 HRS ..from the hour until 5 (five) minutes past the hour.(7:00-7:05 AM, 10:00-10:05 AM, ..., 10:00-10:05 PM).

ALTERNATE TIMING- 0655 to 0705, Etc 5 before till 5 after.. (watch may be incorrect)

ENHANCED MONITORING- Fixed stations or portable stations with enough battery power levels LISTEN EVERY HOUR. (Obviously Continuous Monitoring is also an option.)

SCANNING MONITOR- Consider entering- 146.52 MHz , 52.525, 223.5, 446.0 and 1294.5 MHz in to your scanner radio, or extended scanning monitor radio.

Remind others of this protocol at meetings and on nets.

NOTE- 146.52 IS A CALLING FREQUENCY.... Make your Calls, and then move off the frequency so others can use the frequency. Suggested frequencies to move to; 146.55, 146.43, etc.

PRIORITY TONE SIGNALS- Suggested Priority Radio Transmissions ONLY after 4 minutes after the hour.

USE the LONG TONE ZERO (on Touch Tone Pad) Begin calls for assistance with 10 or more seconds of TONE with the LiTZ signal. ( LONG TONE ZERO )- This timing would help those in trouble not be covered up by the tone itself.

These are CALLING FREQUENCIES, and the CALLING should only start at 4 minutes after the hour preceded by listening for 30 seconds...LISTEN FIRST- CALL CQ with short transmissions, then carefully listen. LISTEN FIRST! always a good idea!


http://www.search-rescue.net/news-information.htm

I haven't used this yet or monitored BUT next time I am in the backcounrty I will participate. I got the freqs on both my handhelds and mobile.

Ursidae69
12-10-2005, 03:22 AM
Interesting. I've monitored 146.52 on many occasions and have ever heard anyone use it. I've even tried to raise people before calling CQ on 146.52 with no luck. I'll have to start listening more I think and check with the local clubs, see if they are doing this.

Scott Brady
12-10-2005, 04:22 AM
Do I understand correctly that this frequency is for emergency assistance broadcasts? If someone is injured or stranded, they would transmit at the beginning of the hour (with the three hour interval).

So this frequency should not be used for anything but emergency transmission and monitoring...

asteffes
12-10-2005, 05:42 PM
Do I understand correctly that this frequency is for emergency assistance broadcasts? If someone is injured or stranded, they would transmit at the beginning of the hour (with the three hour interval).

So this frequency should not be used for anything but emergency transmission and monitoring...


Scott, the calling frequency is, in regular parlance, for starting a conversation. The emergency comms aspect of it comes in to play wit the Wilderness Protocol encouraging hams to listen for any emergency comms near the top of each hour. The frequency can be used by anyone at anytime for any regular ham communication; the Protocol merely asks one to go silent and listen for any requesting aid once an hour.

UncleChris
12-10-2005, 06:14 PM
Do I understand correctly that this frequency is for emergency assistance broadcasts? If someone is injured or stranded, they would transmit at the beginning of the hour (with the three hour interval).

So this frequency should not be used for anything but emergency transmission and monitoring...

I think the idea is that there are generally accepted frequencies for wilderness use, with set periods for monitoring for emergency use.

As Adam said, you have the dedicated time slots for emergency calls/monitoring and the rest of the time these freqs would be available for use to check who is out there, setting up checkins,setting up other frequencies to use with contacts for more general discussion,etc........

I found this valuable because my initial interest in Ham Radio was to have longer distance communication with my 4 wheeling friends as well as some kind of comms if I go out in the wilderness solo.

pskhaat
12-10-2005, 06:16 PM
I actually didn't know there was any `standard' per se. 52.525 is local calling freq that I monitor often. I'll have to add the rest in. In addition (I can't seem to find a reference to this) is also a FRS/GMRS emergency calling which I should plug in too.

I also monitor Ch9 on CB though it's squelched pretty high, I figure one day I'll need the help...