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Falkon
11-26-2011, 01:29 PM
I am going to get a set of used inexpensive of wheels to try on my 04 Tundra, most likely some stock Tacoma wheels.

For off road use, what is considered the best wheel size? I am thinking somewhere between 16 & 18". What would the pros and cons be.of.differing sizes? This truck also sees alot of hiway time as well.

Are steels better than other metals? Can the steel take more abuse and stay true?

Thanks!

CB

Caduceus
12-02-2011, 07:49 PM
No one's replied yet ... wierd.

I don't think there is a "best" out there. what are you planning on? Mud, sand, forest roads, snow? Mudders may be great if you're out swamping, but crap on highway and will wear down quick. Most folks seem to like 16", with 17" being OK too. Dont' see too many 18" tires out there. something to do with more sidewall if you need to air down and increase surface area.

Know nothing about the wheels, but I don't see why steel would be some miracle over other things. You're driving, not shooting, the wheels. Should be the rubber only making contact w/ the ground.

Falkon
12-02-2011, 08:03 PM
Thanks for the response Caduceus.

Most of my off-roading consists of FS roads, dirt, GA slick as snot red clay, mud, rocks. Not much sand. I've been tempted to try some KM2's or Toyo OC's, but my highway/off-road ratio is greatly skewed toward highway. So I am note sure I'll be able to realize the benfits of an MT.

I think 16" is probably the most economical as I am keeping my Enkeis for now to see if I can stand to be apart from them. There seemsto be a large selection of tires for the 16" rim.

As far as wheel material, I seem to read about someone always getting "steelies" so it seemed, to my untrained mind, that they may have some benefits over aluminum or alloy. Maybe they can take hitting a rcok whiler aired down better than other materials, I dunno.

1911
12-02-2011, 09:28 PM
As far as wheel material, I seem to read about someone always getting "steelies" so it seemed, to my untrained mind, that they may have some benefits over aluminum or alloy. Maybe they can take hitting a rcok whiler aired down better than other materials, I dunno.

Steel wheels can be repaired in the field much easier (with a ball peen hammer). Steel is much more malleable than aluminum alloy, and a hit that might crack or crease an alloy rim will just bend the steel rim and you can beat it out with a hammer.

Falkon
12-03-2011, 01:15 PM
Thanks 1911, that makes sense.

Petrolburner
12-04-2011, 05:35 PM
I can't say that I've ever had to beat a steel wheel back into shape, but it is possible that they could take a bigger hit without cracking. I think most people are just dreaming when they say they could hammer a steel wheel back into shape. You and your little hammer are going to equal the force of a 4000 pound vehicle colliding with a rock? Really? Besides, if you actually messed up a wheel you're just going to throw the spare on and keep going. You do have a full size spare right? Also if you're aired down that far that the tire is going to bottom out and hit the rocks you're driving over, wouldn't you have some burly beadlock wheels already? How many folks have scraped the side of a rock so hard, or slid sideways into a rock just right in order to crack an aluminum wheel anyway? Just carry a good useable spare. You're probably going to try in vain to torch and hammer that steel wheel back into shape in the garage anyway. And then buy a new wheel after you've hammered on it awhile :p

As far as size goes I see my original post didn't show up. Go with the smallest rim that fits over the brakes. More sidewall gives more cushion and damping just like the shocks. Also more room to air down. I have 285 75 16 and my rims are above the curb, so curb rash is no problem. I think the pro comp 8069 is one of the best wheels, and cheap too. Very easy to clean, no complex surfaces to catch mud. Aluminum is lighter so less horsepower being robbed.

Not a great shot but here are mine
77261

Lostmanifesto
12-04-2011, 05:39 PM
I always suggest more tire less wheel.

Falkon
12-04-2011, 06:33 PM
Petrol - So did you have any issues with 16's on your Tundra? It is an AC right? I would like to do some used stock tacoma 16's to start, if I can make them fit.

1911
12-04-2011, 09:28 PM
I can't say that I've ever had to beat a steel wheel back into shape, but it is possible that they could take a bigger hit without cracking. I think most people are just dreaming when they say they could hammer a steel wheel back into shape. You and your little hammer are going to equal the force of a 4000 pound vehicle colliding with a rock? Really?

Really. Like I said, steel is very malleable and yes, a ball peen hammer works great. If you have never tried it, why knock it?

Trail100
12-11-2011, 12:38 AM
Really. Like I said, steel is very malleable and yes, a ball peen hammer works great. If you have never tried it, why knock it?

X2 .. Catching a lip hard enough to bend a steel rim enough to keep it from holding air would have a good chance of cracking or breaking an aluminum rim, and agreed you can usually beat a steel rim back far enough to hold air at least, it may not be pretty but it'll get you home. As far as the diameter, both Petrolburner and Lostmanifesto are right, more sidewall gives you more cushion (and potentially a bigger footprint aired down) on a rough trail, but less sidewall would handle better and be more responsive on the highway, it's a compromise either way just like everything else.