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McFly2003
12-07-2011, 04:52 AM
So I am looking into purchasing a snorkel for my t4r. While I am a huge fan of the look, I also plan to use it. I have already had my rig up to the headlights (unintentionally) and that was a tooshy clencher to say the least. after driving through those flood waters, my starter developed a bit of a hickup for a few days following and that got me thinking: what else is necessary to waterproof my rig? any writeups or DIY's? Any help is greatly appreciated! :sombrero:

cruiseroutfit
12-07-2011, 04:58 AM
I'll try and get that Tacoma Mag article posted, in the meantime.

Axles (extend vent lines)
Transfer Case (extend vent lines)
Transmissions (extend vent lines)
Air Compressors (add vent line to a sealed air cleaner)
Engine (snorkel)
Distributor (extend vent if present, verify seal at base)
Spark Plug boots (I like to lightly grease the boots to prevent misfire)

barlowrs
12-07-2011, 04:59 AM
Extend all breathers (diffs, actuators, gas tank tranny, diff, etc). swap to an electric fan so you can shut it off (so you don’t throw a blade), if you plan on doing it a lot (highly not suggested), waterproof your ECU, or relocate it very high. Di-electric paste on as many electrical connections you can get too. Seal all rubber grommets under your cab.....basically there is a LOT to do, and at the end of the day, you are still driving a gasoline engine through water...it was not made for this, and will never like it...so be prepared to have issues if you do it all the time.

I would never go LOOKING for water, in fact I would drive miles out of the way to try to find a bridge or better place to cross, but if you must technique is just as important as prep..WALK your path prior to diving in. Go slow and steady to get a nice bow wave.

McFly2003
12-07-2011, 05:09 AM
Great info. I wonder why, if there are so many breathers to extend, it is so popular to just extend the rear diff breather. I have mine extended up to the top of my rear hatch, but never even though about any others. The only truly high water I have had to have this rig in was flood water that was blocking my route home. I had to drive though it as the pups were in the house and I didn't know how long they could hold out. If I had to guess, I had my truck up to at least the top f my tires, maybe higher (deckplate mod was sealed up). the only immediate issue was a damp spot in the driver floor board that has turned into a wonderful mildewy smell :(. However, for about 7-10 days following, my starter would not turn over first try if the truck was not warm. It would click and then I would have to give it another turn to get it to fire. Would the starter, and maybe the alternator, need some sort of sealing as well?

edit::I agree and never plan to go looking for chances to drown my rig. I have way to much invested in it to risk ruining it haha. At most it is usually a small to moderate creek crossing

TangoBlue
12-07-2011, 05:21 AM
All good recommendations for the truck, but everyone neglects the driver and passengers...

http://i394.photobucket.com/albums/pp22/TangoBlue/deepdive.jpg

McFly2003
12-07-2011, 05:51 AM
funny you should mention it, my SCUBA gear is in the truck as we speak haha

Applejack
12-07-2011, 10:55 AM
Great info. I wonder why, if there are so many breathers to extend, it is so popular to just extend the rear diff breather. I have mine extended up to the top of my rear hatch, but never even though about any others.

Typically the rear diff breather is the lowest of the breathers, for whatever reason they leave it sitting just on top of the axle. The front is routed into the engine compartment and transmissions and t-cases sit higher than diffs do and are enough out of harms way that 98-99% of people, even those who off road, need not modify it.
However that rear bugger is too low and is easily submerged even when one is trying to be careful.

So there's that and there's all the hype.:snorkel:

McFly2003
12-07-2011, 01:49 PM
Typically the rear diff breather is the lowest of the breathers, for whatever reason they leave it sitting just on top of the axle. The front is routed into the engine compartment and transmissions and t-cases sit higher than diffs do and are enough out of harms way that 98-99% of people, even those who off road, need not modify it.
However that rear bugger is too low and is easily submerged even when one is trying to be careful.

So there's that and there's all the hype.:snorkel:

good to know!

cruiseroutfit
12-07-2011, 05:35 PM
Another great resource:
http://pangaea-expeditions.com/waterproofing-your-vehicle/

McFly2003
12-07-2011, 06:14 PM
Another great resource:
http://pangaea-expeditions.com/waterproofing-your-vehicle/

Thanks for the link!

Sent from my DROIDX using Tapatalk

PHXtaco
12-07-2011, 08:42 PM
I’ll add to that article... for those of us without electric fans, but have a clutch fan, you can tie off the fan blade with rope or a bungee and it will prevent the fan (but not the water pump) from turning. I learned this trick after losing a couple fan blades doing a deep water crossing. NOTE if you do not have a clutch fan, or the clutch is seized up, something is going to go flying, either the cord or fan, with potentially disastrous results.

TangoBlue
12-07-2011, 08:44 PM
I’ll add for to that article... for those of us without electric fans, but have a clutch fan, you can tie off the fan blade with rope or a bungee and it will prevent the fan (but not the water pump) from turning. I learned this trick after losing a couple fan blades doing a deep water crossing. NOTE if you do not have a clutch fan, or the clutch is seized up, something is going to go flying, either the cord or fan, with potentially disastrous results.

I did not know that...