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Thread: Basic Tool List

  1. #1
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    Default Basic Tool List

    we have a VERY detailed list for recovery, another for survival, was thinking maybe we should have a basic tool/parts list to take with us. Now with all this gear listed in these lists if you took it all, on each outing it would probably leave no room for a driver of the vehicle. These lists even with the repeat items are good checklists, or eye openers at the least. I think alot of people just jump in a 4x4 not understanding or even considering some of these things. The great part about this is if it helps only one person it has done its job! Now I am a newbie here, but I see the member list steadily growing...maybe this may help countless people. The powers that be may include a sticky for recovery..tools...equip..gear a basic offroader may want to invest in, not only financially but with the time to learn how to use these items functionally. I think this site is already an excellent resource, and I think it will only get better! Anyhow the basic tool list should include?

    screwwdriver
    wire strippers
    voltage tester

    OK chime in....

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
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    Hayward, CA
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    Dude... The first item on every gear, tool, recovery, disaster, anti-terror - even first aid kit - list is always duct tape!
    2006 Toyota Tacoma

  3. #3
    JB weld.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Austin, TX
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    255
    First, the "get me through it" list:

    Duct tape
    Baling wire
    Friction tape
    Stop-Leak
    Two mtn bike inner tubes
    JB Weld
    Two-part expoxy
    Electrical tape
    Loctite
    Extra hose clamps
    Extra electrical wire
    Coffee can full of assorted extra hardware (nuts, bolts, screws)
    Tire patch kit (includes large vulcanizing patches)

    The above list is not negotiable and -in a pinch-, can really save you from disaster. Ideally, one would never get to the point to have to use any of the above for a proper field repair, but the reality is that expeditions rarely go exactly as planned....*this* is my basic tool kit. More on actual hand tools later!
    Last edited by 60seriesguy; 04-03-2006 at 04:15 AM.
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  5. #5
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    Jun 2005
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    Thanks for the great thread idea.

    I have found that some of the larger tool kits available from Costco satisfy 80% of the required tools and also keep everything organized in the molded case.

    Then I have another case for spares and another for specialty tools. Those kits are specific to the vehicles (I have one for the Jeep, Trooper, Tacoma) These are things like hub sockets, breaker bars, bolts and nuts, thread locking compound, saws, etc.
    Scott Brady
    Overland Journal
    D1 | LJ78 | LR4 | MKIII | J8 | G-Wagen | Range Rover Classic | TE630

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by asteffes
    Dude... The first item on every gear, tool, recovery, disaster, anti-terror - even first aid kit - list is always duct tape!

    yeah, i guess that is a no brainer!

    and the second item probably should be a beverage of choice

  7. #7
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    Feb 2006
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    salt lick city utah
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    i think that one very important item espcially for 96 and newer obdII trucks like all the tacos and newer jeeps, etc around here should be a code scan tool of some kind. i have this one and keep it in my truck and have used it more times for others than my self. actron 9145 http://www.actron.com/product_detail.php?pid=16150

    in fact i still need to buy the cable to hook up to my ford. anyhow i think this is a needed tool for anyone going on an adventure. people always talk about how an old truck with a disel is best becasuse there are only a couple of wires to worry about, but with the modern trucks we all need/choose to drive being reliable in the outback means you need to be able to at least know what it is the computer is telling you is wrong with the truck. most of the time the new stuff will still run well enough to get u back to the pavement just not that well. modern electronics are great because they dont need as much tinkering as old stuff does but when it does need fixin you should be able to know whats wrong and with out a scanner you cant. i think that tool should be able to show real time data so thats why i went with the 9145 over a cheaper type that just shows the code number.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by david despain
    i think that one very important item espcially for 96 and newer obdII trucks like all the tacos and newer jeeps, etc around here should be a code scan tool of some kind. i have this one and keep it in my truck and have used it more times for others than my self. actron 9145 http://www.actron.com/product_detail.php?pid=16150

    in fact i still need to buy the cable to hook up to my ford. anyhow i think this is a needed tool for anyone going on an adventure. people always talk about how an old truck with a disel is best becasuse there are only a couple of wires to worry about, but with the modern trucks we all need/choose to drive being reliable in the outback means you need to be able to at least know what it is the computer is telling you is wrong with the truck. most of the time the new stuff will still run well enough to get u back to the pavement just not that well. modern electronics are great because they dont need as much tinkering as old stuff does but when it does need fixin you should be able to know whats wrong and with out a scanner you cant. i think that tool should be able to show real time data so thats why i went with the 9145 over a cheaper type that just shows the code number.

    that is a good point, and probably very easy to overlook.

  9. #9
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    Mar 2006
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    Philadelphia, PA
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    on the subject of toolage...how do you carry your tools? mounted toolbox? ammo can? portable tool box? just wondering...

  10. #10
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    Aug 2005
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    Portable tool box here.
    Aaron
    ExPo member #51

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