Thread: The Quigley Buildup

  1. #11
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    Just found some more info on using the hydronic heaters as air heaters....it's actually from espars website under the marine section.
    http://www.espar.com/pdfs/marine.pdf

  2. #12
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    You could always use the airtronic for direct air heating but that is more expense, overall it could be less weight than the matrix heaters needed for the hydronic, the airtronics are more efficient that the hydronics for a given heat output and you get instant results, likewise you can switch it on and off as you need. The hydronic is typically for slower and more long term heating solutions and hot water.

    My small 421 unimog which used to be a snow blower had the really old version of the airtronic behind the passenger seat. It would warm the cab in seconds but I removed it because it would swallow the outside of the truck in a fog of white smoke. I tried to rebuild it and espar told me what was wrong with it but they could not source the parts, I still have it if somewhere.

    Scott, you should look at espar for your arctic trip.

    Rob
    You don't inherit the world from your parents, you borrow it from your children.
    --------
    1979 Unimog 416 Expedition Camper
    1974 Unimog 421
    2004 Dodge Ram 2500, 4x4, Double Cab, Cummins Turbo Diesel
    2006 25' Airstream International CCD
    2009 Harley Davidson

    Sugarloaf, Boulder, CO

  3. #13
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    Jeff, I just noticed another potential problem with your proposed water system. The filter you have choosen only has a flow rate of 0.5 gallons per minute which is not high enough for aquajet. Basically the pump will be able to reach shut off pressure when the faucet is open and you'll end up cycling the pump which that pump is designed not to do. Most RV pumps have this problem but I have no idea if it will bother the aquajet.

    Rob
    You don't inherit the world from your parents, you borrow it from your children.
    --------
    1979 Unimog 416 Expedition Camper
    1974 Unimog 421
    2004 Dodge Ram 2500, 4x4, Double Cab, Cummins Turbo Diesel
    2006 25' Airstream International CCD
    2009 Harley Davidson

    Sugarloaf, Boulder, CO

  4. #14
    gjackson's Avatar
    gjackson is offline Overland Training Alumni
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    Jeff,

    Don't know if you have a fridge yet, but if you are interested I have a cabinet 12v fridge that came with my Defender. Originally to be supplied to NATO. If you are intersted I'll check on size and whatever else I can find out. Will sell cheap!

    cheers

  5. #15
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    Looks like you're more on top of this than i am Rob, I didn't notice that in the faq on the aquajet and never thought of that being a problem. This is the first time i've ever tried to plan and build up something like this so i'm really appreciating the help on it.
    I just emailed aquajet to see if there's something i can change on the pump...otherwise i'll probably have to return either the pump or the purifier...so far i've only found one purifier that looks to be nice and flows over .5 gallon per minute...but it's $460!

    Graham - I'm definitely interested, i'll pm you.

  6. #16
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    Just an idea for the floor: Get the tub Rhino lined and then use simple, roll up carpet runner.

    nice find on the water tank gauge; I am going to look into it.

    The 285/75 is an ok tire for your application, but don't shy from the 255/85 for the reasons stated above. Stability is only gained by an increase in track width, not tire width as is commonly mentioned. I.E. the 255/85 with a wheel with less off-set will provide the same stability as a 285. On my Tacoma, I decreased the off-set from stock by .75, which gained me 20mm of additional track width per side and nearly the same overall track width as 285's on stock wheels. Then you would have the increased efficiency (reduced rotating and reciprocating mass and less frontal resistance) of a narrow tire and the same stability. If you cant find a 255 replacement tire in the middle of nowhere, a 285 will work to get you back on the road.
    Scott Brady
    Overland Journal
    D1 | LJ78 | LR4 | MKIII | J8 | G-Wagen | Range Rover Classic | TE630

  7. #17
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    Well I started working on the floor last week...but got interrupted by a quick trip to san felipe, mx....a worthy distraction

    The first step was removing the plywood floor that it came with...since the screws had all been covered up with wood filler this was a bit of a challenge! Once i got all the plywood cleaned up I went in and filled all the holes with silicone...maybe i should have used something like bondo...we'll see.
    After everything had dried i went in and laid down the insulation and taped it up with aluminum tape. I can't tell yet how effective the insulation will be but as noise reduction it has made a noticeable difference.

    Now onto finishing the floor and insulating the sides!

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeff@work
    18seeds -
    So did you just have the honda generator running all night for the heater?
    Do you think the insulation you had on the walls was enough?
    Did you try laying any insulation down on the floors other than the carpet?

    Thanks guys! I really appreciate the time everyone took to read this and give well thoughtout opinions.
    Yes the generator ran all night but needed to be filled up once a night. I think you can tune it better it will run all night long. It was my friends and he was lazy and never got it tuned for high altitudes.

    The insulation in the walls was plenty. I see yours is a window van so that can make it harder. I cut a piece of blue insulation to go over the windows. worked pretty good.

    The floor is a MAJOR problem area. From what I have learned there is no really good way to insulate the floor. I've heard of some people doing some pretty crazy things.

    There is a 4x4 van group on yahoo that can be a great resource.
    2012 Toyota

  9. #19
    I thought I'd add $.02

    I "did" vans before owning Casa Azul. 1 chevy in early 80's, 1 E250 in late 80's (old body), and 1 new style E250 in the 90's. All of them 2 wheel drive.

    Being into MT. bikes, Kayaking, and formerly sailboarding...They were constantly crammed with gear when I went and road tripped. Now that I've got Casa its like going exploring in a condominium. Truth be told...I really miss the "fast attack" camping that can be only done in a stealth white Ford van!

    Before I share my observations, I have to admit that...

    I DON'T LIKE COLD PLACES

    And the only ice that i want to see is in my high-test Margarita!

    So I can't add anything to the how to stay warm discussion.

    I guess the biggest thing for me regarding any vehicle one set up for camping is...Do you camp in it or out of it???

    With Casa Azul we camp "in" it because we have all kinds of storage and the layout is every open and airy, But its F'en HUGE!

    With my vans, I camped "out" of them except for when we parked stealth when in transit or had bad weather. You know...they awning goes out, the mexican reed mats go down, the cook table goes up, the beach chairs and bar box/table get set in front of the fire pit, and so on. Then at bedtime my girlie and i would climb in the bed in the back with enough room to change clothes and use the porta-potti. This was our typical MO and if it was really nucken (went through a hurricane on mainland Mexico and more Nort'es than i can count in Baja) we would stash the outside gear under the van and have enough room to confortably fair the storm for several days without sufering cabin fever.

    A passenger seat swivel is also a "must have". The drivers seat isn't as useful because of the stearing wheel.

    It seem to me that Sportsmobil and the other van RV companies try to make the space in a Van "bigger than it really is by adding a bunch a furniture that in reality just makes it more cramped.

    I wish I had a pop-top back them, but if I did...I doubt I would have changed the internal layout of the back of my van.

    Pop-tops are cool...In fact they're cold. One would be hard presses to design a better heat sink for a van! So, that being said...You'd be wise to make sure that your able to sleep in the back of your van with that sucker (of warm) closed. This is especcially true if your planning to go to Baja in the fall or winter months because of the Nort'es.

    As far as internal layout goes...How tall are you? if your under 6', than you can set up a bed going sideways. I'm 6'2" and suffered the worst night of my life sleeping in my (un-insolated) van one freezing night at Laguna Hanson. I quickly changed my bed to length wise.

    One good advantage with a lengthwise bed is that you can have a gap between your bed and the van wall that can fit 2 mt.bikes or several sheets of plywood (and other "big") when not camping.

    The attachment is the bed frame I designed for a friend of mine with a syncros van but the concept is the same. The bottom space is for cargo box's and the gap just under the plate is for folding tables and chairs.

    I first put a bench-fold to a bed in Casa Azul. It was terrible for both! worse than a hide-a-bed!

    I had a small fixed propane tank under my van and plumbed into the van for a small top-open reefer and then had a fitting at the tank to screw in a hose for an outside hose for a stove and lantern.

    As far as H20 goes...No matter how much you've got....You'll always want more! Casa Azul has 100 gallons and when in Baja we practice water conservation but still need to get H20 every 1 1/2 weeks. The difference between staying a few more days is usually depends on your h20 supply.

    That being said...I'd go for a h20 tank (I just used 5 g plastic bottles with a screw on hand pump) but just do a hand pump so that your basically forced to conserve h20. trust me, you'll waste h20 with a pressurized system. I've also had my h20 pump go out in the middle of nowhere...What a pain in the @ss!

    Here is another thing about h20 I learned the hard way...Filtering

    If your going to filter...do it going into your tank AND going out of your spigot!

    Or do like we do...

    WE ONLY PUT AGUA PURIFACADO IN OUR TANKS!!!!!We shower in it! we wash with it! we shower in it! the dogs drink it!

    Why? the consequinces are to GREAT! Granted its a little more expensive BUT WAY WORTH THE EXPENSE!

  10. #20
    gjackson's Avatar
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    Jeff,

    The fridge is a Coolmatic Waeco MDC-65. Brand new, only ever switched on, but never used. Is a front loader with a small freezer compartment. Outside dimensions are: 24" high x 19.5" wide x 19.5" deep. With the door catch the height at the front is 25.5". It comes with the manual and a Land Rover made tie down hoop that is pretty stout!

    The door is hinged at the front, so it doesn't get any wider with the door open. According to the manual, the voltage requirements are 4amps @ 12vDC or 2amps @ 24vDC. Has a 70w power rating.

    Nice little unit, and we would have used it except the front loading didn't really fit with our packing system. I have attched some pics.

    cheers

    Graham

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