Thread: unURBAN Adventures - Alaska to Argentina to AFRICA!

  1. #371
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    108
    diesels will run/idle very lean so i think you'll start up ok - but bummer it cuts back the fuel so much - I'd expect a TDI to run enough boost you wouldn't feel it so much - darn computers .

  2. #372
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Oregon Coast
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    147
    Have you guys needed a Carnet de Passage for your Patrol yet? I don't remember seeing anything about that in your border crossing posts. Have any of the crossings asked for it, if you don't have one?

    In regards to elevation, how do you guys adapt to the higher elevations? Has it been a gradual transition from near sea level to 4800m? I'm wondering if you noticed any physical effects since leaving the coast of Colombia to this point?
    92 Dodge W250 regular cab, Cummins, 5 spd, 255/ 85R16 Toyo MT's, some other tweaking and changes.

  3. #373
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Granbury, TX
    Posts
    13

    Default Well done

    Well done on your adventure. I am very envious, perhaps one day I will get the guts to do something like you have accomplished. Bon voyage.

  4. #374
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    474
    Thanks for comments everybody!

    Quote Originally Posted by SChandler View Post
    Have you guys needed a Carnet de Passage for your Patrol yet? I don't remember seeing anything about that in your border crossing posts. Have any of the crossings asked for it, if you don't have one?

    In regards to elevation, how do you guys adapt to the higher elevations? Has it been a gradual transition from near sea level to 4800m? I'm wondering if you noticed any physical effects since leaving the coast of Colombia to this point?
    You don't need the Carnet de Passage for any countries in Central or South America, and we have never been asked. A temporary vehicle import permit is issued at the borders.

    The only "vehicle document" we have arranged before starting the trip (Central and South that is, USA is a different story for a European vehicle....) is insurance. We use a Dutch company called Alessi, and they provide liability and comprehensive for Central and South America. However, 5 countries (Mexico, Belize, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Colombia) does not recognice forreign insurances, and it is mandatory to purchase this locallly at the border when you drive in. The comprehensive part is valid though.

    Regarding acclimatization to higher altitude, this is normally not a problem as you climb gradually higher and higher. Most people will be fine driving from sealevel and up to about 3000 meter (9000 ft) without getting altitude sickness. You'll probably feel it, but only as being out of breath when moving around. Driving up into the Andes from Colombia, you climb and camp gradually higher and higher (with some days driving back down). Going from Colombia and into Ecuador, you will be fairly welll aclimatized before finding the really high mountain passes.

    As a rule of thumb, you normally try to not increase the sleeping height more than 300 meters (900 ft) every day above 3000 meters (9000 ft), and every fourth day should be a "rest" day (not climbing higher). When aclimatized, going back down to sealevel for a couple of days, maybe as much as a week, would normally not be a problem. However, how a human body responds to altitude can be very different, and you should always be careful. It is also much less critical to drive over a high pass and being exposed to high altitude for a relatively short periode of time, compared to actually spend the night there. So if you can sleep at 3500 meters (11500 ft), it would not be a problem driving over a pass at 4500-5000 meters (14-15000 ft) for a couple of hours as long as you go back down before setting up camp.

    So, yes! We do feel the altitude when going over the high passes, or when we camp high up inthe mountains, but it has never been a problem.

    E
    ---------
    unURBAN Project on http://www.unurban.no
    ...and more pics on http://www.flickr.com/malinandespen

  5. #375
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    474

    Default Trujillo and The Pacific



    Our planned travel route in Peru would take us south going more or less up in the Andes mountains. However, we decided to make one stop down by the coast around Trujillo to check out the Pacific once more. We camped in the small fishing village of Huanchaco. While we were there it was some kind of festival for the fishermen.



    The local fishermen still use the traditional small boat made of four cigar shaped bundles of tied together tortora reeds when they go out fishing.



    For the festival, one larger boat was made out of tortora reeds, and in this one they put a saint (or something) that they sailed to shore and transferred to a small copy of more modern boat. We did not fully understand what happened at this festival, but people were happy and in a good mood.



    Since we were close to a bigger city, we used the opportunity to have a service on the Patrol at the Nissan-Volvo garage in Trujillo. It was a couple of things we wanted done beside the normal oil and filter changes (hand brake parts, bushes for the rear link arms, a new resistor for a sensor lamp, etc), and when we talked to them and made an appointment for the next morning, they said that they would be able to get parts and fix what we wanted done. The next day when we show up for the service they tell us our Norwegian Patrol is a bit different from the one in Peru, and therefore they cannot get the parts we wanted (Next day when we passed a parked Patrol on the street Espen had a look underneath it and the parts we wanted looked exactly like ours…). So all they ended up being able to do was the normal simple oil and filter changes. We wondered what Peruvian owners of Patrols do here if they really need something fixed on their car. It was not really an emergency for us so we will see if Espen can fix what Nissan can’t do somewhere else.

    Around Trujillo there are numerous archeological sites, and we decided to visit two of the sites. One was the incredible La Huaca de la Luna (Temple of the Moon) which is a pyramid/temple built out of adobe bricks by the Moche culture. The peak for the Moche culture was between 400 and 600 AD.



    The Pyramid of the Moon is built at the foot of the sacred mountain Cerro Blanco, and it is part of an older complex where one pyramid was built over an older pyramid. In total there are five pyramids under the pyramid that we see.



    The outer layer was pretty damaged by rain and weather, but archeologist found incredible painted friezes underneath on pyramid four and three. It is an incredible amount of adobe bricks that has been produced to build this pyramid, and the producer have signed the bricks with his signature… (see the smiley face on the upper left row ).



    500 meters from the Moon Temple is the Sun Temple (Huaca del Sol), and in between them is (well, it used to be)) the village. The Temple of the Sun is not open for visitors, but we could drive next to it and look up on it. Our guide book told us that the estimates of the pyramid’s brickwork vary between 50 million and 140 million adobe bricks!!! No matter what the number is, it is incredible!



    On the road between Trujillo and Huanchuco is the ruined city of Chan Chan that stretches across a large sector of the Moche Valley. Chan Chan was the capital of the Chimue Empire that appeared on the Peruvian Coast around 1100 AD. Tschudi Temple-Citadel, which is one out of nine Citadels, has been restored and is open for visitors. What impressed us the most about Chan Chan was not the restored site, but the size of the whole city and the remains you can still see. It must have been an enormous city at its peak.



    After some days on the cost it was time to head up to the mountains again. Goodbye Pacific!!

    E&M
    ---------
    unURBAN Project on http://www.unurban.no
    ...and more pics on http://www.flickr.com/malinandespen

  6. #376
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Wyoming
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    2,618
    WOW...just WOW!!

    Really like the recent updates. It sounds like you may be getting just a little weary of life on the road though. If so it is certainly understandable, you both have been traveling for some time. I will continue to enjoy your trips updates though until the end....

    My YouTube channel
    1991 FJ80: Vortec 5.7L v8, FZJ80 locked axles, 4L60e trans, split case and plenty more!
    1988 FJ62: TD-S/C-I/C diesel, NV4500, Atlas T-case, portal axles, FZJ80 chassis and lot's more! A long term work in progress.

  7. #377
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Eugene, OR. USA
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    1,834
    Quote Originally Posted by RMP&O View Post
    WOW...just WOW!!

    Really like the recent updates. It sounds like you may be getting just a little weary of life on the road though. If so it is certainly understandable, you both have been traveling for some time. I will continue to enjoy your trips updates though until the end....

    Are you kidding me....geee.....after all this I think they sound excited and happy to be exploring new stuff. vibrant people doing fascinating stuff. they make me feel like I wasted my youth.

    Thank you for such a great report on your adventures.
    You don't sound weary to me......you sound more like you will run out of continents before you are my age.

  8. #378
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    near Asheville, NC
    Posts
    663
    We've really enjoyed seeing the archaeological sites you've been visiting...keep it coming, I'm constantly updating my destination list!
    Recently finished 2 years exploring North, Central & South America in our '87 4Runner

  9. #379
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    474
    We can guarantee that we are NOT tired of travelling, and we'll keep on going as long as we can!! You won't get rid of us just yet, RMP&O! ;-)
    .
    BUT! When that is said, we have to admit that in the last couple of weeks our minds have been kind of split in two, one part exploring Peru, and the other part preparing for the trip back home. It has been a year since we've seen friends and familily (most family, that is.. some came over to visit when we were on Yucatan), so we are really looking forward to this trip back to Norway.
    .
    There are still some stories to tell about Peru, so we'll try to get the photos organized and posted as soon as we're home. And then, perhaps there will be a week or two without posts.... :-) Or maybe will post some pictures from Norway.....

    E&M
    ---------
    unURBAN Project on http://www.unurban.no
    ...and more pics on http://www.flickr.com/malinandespen

  10. #380
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Norway, Europe
    Posts
    166
    Are you comming home permanently, or just a trip?

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