Thread: Touring Bikes

  1. #21
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    Feb 2006
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    Squamish, BC, Canada
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    There's been some great advice so far, another bike to look at is the Kona Sutra. I has a more mountain bike feel but rides very nice and comes equipped well, jut don't use the front rack with out modification. 2 of us spent 2 weeks riding on the Pacific coast this past Fall and had zero issues.
    Bike Mike
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    That fits many Mountain Bikes

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    Fresno, CA
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    Default Born for expedition

    To me, a expedtion bike must be strong enough to carry all the gear to support a multi week or month trip. Trailers work but, a couple bikes don't need the help.

    The Condor MO-93. The real "Swiss Army Bike"



    Designed to carry 300 lbs. Even can carry your bazooka.



    Runner up: Yuba Mundo


  3. #23
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    Mar 2010
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    Fresno, CA
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    300 lbs motar carriers for the Swiss Army Bike

    Loaded for a expedition

    Switzerland

  4. #24
    Christophe Noel's Avatar
    Christophe Noel is offline Expedition Portal Team Adventure Bike Moderator
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    The ExPo project bike is a Salsa Fargo. It's gone through phase one as a fun singltrack adventure bike set up as a singlespeed. Phase two was the commuter phase. It's soon to be set up as a proper geared touring bike. As a versitile platform for touring off-piste, it's pretty impressive. I just wish I had popped for the Lynskey-built titanium version.

    fargo6.jpg
    Bicycles rule.

  5. #25
    Christophe Noel's Avatar
    Christophe Noel is offline Expedition Portal Team Adventure Bike Moderator
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    By the way, this is my good buddy, Chad.

    chad1.jpg

    He has ridden the same bike from Alaska to Colorado. He then went from Alaska to Mexico via the Continental Divide. He is currently on his latest ride from Alaska to Tierra del Fuego. He's somewhere in Columbia at this point. That bike burried beneath all that gear is a 2001 Specialized Rockhopper with a retail value of about $750. Pretty amazing, but simple gear can do the trick if you let it.
    Bicycles rule.

  6. #26
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    May 2007
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    SLC, UT
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    Another vote for the LHT...

    Here is mine:

    Chris K.

    99' UZJ100

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    291
    Quote Originally Posted by Flounder View Post
    The ExPo project bike is a Salsa Fargo. It's gone through phase one as a fun singltrack adventure bike set up as a singlespeed. Phase two was the commuter phase. It's soon to be set up as a proper geared touring bike. As a versitile platform for touring off-piste, it's pretty impressive. I just wish I had popped for the Lynskey-built titanium version.

    fargo6.jpg
    Looking forward to seeing this write-up.
    I'd love to build a Ti Fargo for longer day rides and bikepacking!!!
    In your opinion, how would this bike compare with a traditional road bike (like the long haul trucker) for bike touring?
    jg

  8. #28
    Christophe Noel's Avatar
    Christophe Noel is offline Expedition Portal Team Adventure Bike Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgolden View Post
    Looking forward to seeing this write-up.
    I'd love to build a Ti Fargo for longer day rides and bikepacking!!!
    In your opinion, how would this bike compare with a traditional road bike (like the long haul trucker) for bike touring?
    jg
    That's a great question, and a tough question, too. The Fargo is a strange beast. It a nutshell, the latest generation of Fargo is really just a 29er mountain bike frame, but tweaked a bit to offer some long distance comforts. The wheelbase is obviously longer than most 29ers. The bottom bracket drop is lower, and the rider position far more relaxed. When I'm on the road riding my Fargo shoe'ed up with narrow slicks, it rolls effortlessly. It's stable, comfortable, and feels like a proper touring bike. Knocking down a full day in the saddle is no problem. On the flip side, if I put knobbiest on it and hit the singletrack, it does unbelievably well in technical terrain you'd think would stop it dead in it's tracks. It's clearly not going to win any XC races, but it's pretty nimble. So, what you want out of a Fargo is largely determined by how you build it.

    I think the Fargo is ideal for anyone wanting the most versatile platform they can find. If you want to do a long road tour it'll do it with no problem. If you want to tackle a moderately technical bikepack tour, it'll do it. Even racing the 2700 mile Tour Divide race is not beyond the abilities of the Fargo. Neat bike. Really neat bike.
    Bicycles rule.

  9. #29
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    Oct 2009
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    what about the drop bar on the fargo? drop bars can't be too good in terms of control over rough terrain?

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Flagstaff, Az
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    A road style drop bar would be terrible. An off road drop drop like a WTB, salsa woodchipper or SOMA fabrications is quite different from a road drop. They tend to be
    1 wider
    2 shallow drop
    3 the drop portion is flared outward

    Off road drops are also generally set up for on the drops to be the most commonly used hand position. I use the flat part of mine rarely and occasionally use the hoods.

    There are a lot of different bars out there now. Titec, Jones and Origin 8 make some odd ones. Bar choice is right up there with saddle choice for being personal as far as I am concerned.

    It seems like the new 2nd gen fargo is more suited to flat bars than the first gen. I have seen plenty of 2nd gen fargos with standard mountain bike bars.

    The fargo is not well suited to very rough terrain but gets by admirably. On smooth singe track with gently broad swooping gently radiused turns the Fargo shines. But then again I greatly prefer 26" wheels in the rough stuff. WHen I say rough stuff I mean black diamond + trails. I am sure i cound by quite well on the Fargo on stuff like porcupine rim in moab but it would be faster and more fun on other more technically capable bikes.

    What makes the fargo well suited to hauling loads and very stable while sluggish when trying manuel, bunny hop, pump or sail over a gap jump is the very long chain stays. Seriously the wheel base is way stretched out its crazy long back there, the rear triangle makes a standard ortlieb pannier look small.

    I wish my 1st gen fargo had a normal fork offset so I could run an enabler fork and try out a fat front set up.
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