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Thread: Interior fit out - what are the practicalities of white interior

  1. #1
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    Default Interior fit out - what are the practicalities of white interior

    Hi all - we are just at the stage where we have to choose the colour scheme for the interior fit out.

    We have basically decided to go with an all white interior, a semi gloss two-pack epoxy paint on the lining, cupboards etc, with a teak floor and bench tops with some teak inserts.

    Before we commit to this, does anyone have some experience with white interiors and how do they stand up do the rigors of ROW traveling?

    This is basically what we have chosen - Unicat's most popular colour scheme.







    Iain
    Brisbane, Australia
    Land Rover Defender 110
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  2. #2
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    I like the floors and the interior walls. If that is real wood on the floor, then it'll be warmer than linoleum AND you won't have to vacuum carpet. The white walls, while needing period cleaning, brightens the interior so that you can see better in dim light (so dark walls don't absorb so much light and make things darker), which is nice psychologically in socked-in conditions when you can't be outside or the weather is too bad to drive in. That's my take on it.
    2005 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited (LJ), silver w/black top auto 4WD - Tow Truck

    2006 Forest River Surveyor SV160T hybrid travel trailer

  3. #3
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    Thanks, that what we were thinking as well, but I just wanted to make sure in case I got 100 replies saying white was the worst possible colour as it was always dirty / impossible to keep clean etc etc.

    We are going with a real teak floor, and most likely teak inserts into the cabinets
    Iain
    Brisbane, Australia
    Land Rover Defender 110
    Unimog U1250
    Unimog Central

  4. #4
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    That looks very nice, and very heavy. I assume it's that covered particle board or chip board and the oak? trim. That makes a very nice cabinet and finish is easy to keep clean. Very nice! I could never use that in my truck or camper as the weight would be too much, but your rig can haul it!

  5. #5
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    I'm not use what Unicat use, but mine very light weight - a composite consisting of 1.8mm ply, 12mm structural foam/ 1.8mm or 4mm ply. All up, the interior lining and furniture should weight around 100-120kg - at least that's what the people making them have worked out. The teak is only 5mm thick and the mouldings will also be fairly thin.







    Quote Originally Posted by Ozarker View Post
    That looks very nice, and very heavy. I assume it's that covered particle board or chip board and the oak? trim. That makes a very nice cabinet and finish is easy to keep clean. Very nice! I could never use that in my truck or camper as the weight would be too much, but your rig can haul it!
    Iain
    Brisbane, Australia
    Land Rover Defender 110
    Unimog U1250
    Unimog Central

  6. #6
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    We have chosen white interior because we find that this makes us feeling the room is much larger than it really is. It also gives much more light inside, even outside is bad weather. We are really happy with the color scheme and would chose it again.
    Truck: MAN KAT1 6x6 7t mil gl, 1979, Deutz 8 cyl, 12.8 l, 400 hp, air-cooled, 6-speed, torque converter, GVWR 42,300 lb, range 2000 mls
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  7. #7
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    Hey Iain, you can't just mention your exotic furniture board like that without giving us at least a link to the manufacturer. It's just not cricket.
    A friend calls the white interior "tupperware style" he's right but it's easy to clean.

    That's approximately what I'll be putting in; the wife loves that look. I'm just worried I won't get the edging finish up to Unicat (her) quality level. I'll never hear the end of it; of course I have to do it with no time and a non-existent budge too.

    My only consideration would be that it might be interesting to have the exposed surfaces with a light "flecked" effect. It could avoid obsessive wiping each time the eye catches the pure white surface from a different angle and spots the lines of the last wiping effort.
    Sort of very delicate cream freckles to break up the pure slabs of whiteness.

    I'm beginning to wonder if I'm making any sense; talking colour schemes is above my station, I'll get back to my weather satellite cryostat :-)
    Mine is probably bigger than yours.
    (isn't that what those long signatures are about?)
    I'm talking about my truck, what were you thinking? ;-)

  8. #8
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    The guy building it is a precision woodworker - he does all sorts of custom woodwork, from restoring things like 50 year old Chris craft and 18th century carriages to high end yachts and even things like gun stocks.

    My build will be simple y his standards, and whilst I could save a bit of money going elsewhere, I like his expertise and precision.

    As far as the paint is concerned, it will be a semi-gloss two pack paint finish normally used in custom kitchens.
    Iain
    Brisbane, Australia
    Land Rover Defender 110
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    Unimog Central

  9. #9
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    I've got a truck camper and all the wood is either oak or fake oak. The fabrics are greens, tans, and browns. As I'm constantly stinky dirty when I travel (I also have a Yellow Labrador Retriever and have just rescued a Golden Retriever), I think these are the best colors to "hide" the dirt, dust, and mud. I've lived in mine once for (5) months and plenty of times for several months over the past (5) years. I've never once thought that I wish the interior was white because I want it to feel bigger or somehow change the feel of the light. I try not to spend that much time inside as I'd rather be on the move or doing something. So, I'd say that white would be a huge no for me. I also hate cleaning...............

  10. #10
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    White Melamine with solid wood edging ( I would go for 3mm PVC edging) and white latex paint.

    Latex is very easy to touch up and melamine is the most durable surface cabinet coating available these days...

    Teak for a color contrast is wonderful.

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