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Thread: Enlarging center hub hole on rims: Opinions!

  1. #1
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    Default Enlarging center hub hole on rims: Opinions!

    Alright, I have done some research all over the internet and all I have come across is a lot of opinions. I respect the opinions of ExPo members a lot more then those that I read, so . . . here's my problem:

    I found a set rims and tires exactly what I have been looking for, 285/75s on American Racing Mojaves. The problem is the center hub hole is sized for a chevy (something like 80mm), My toyota T100 I believe needs a 108mm, lug pattern is the same. The price is pretty good, so if I can find a machine shop to enlarge the holes for around $100 for all, I would be happy.

    What are your opinions on this?

    Is it safe? They make rims that fit toyota's how would it be any different.

    Would I have to put a clear coat over the fresh aluminum? would the teflon coating start chipping away?

    Does any one have any experience with this?

    Any help is greatly appreciated.
    97' Toyota T100 SR5 4x4 Manual Trans.

  2. #2
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    Haven't done it myself (yet), but I know of a guy that did that with Jeep JK rims to make them fit an Astro. He hasn't reported any problems on the Astro forums.
    Aaron

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  3. #3
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    I've never heard of a problem from those that have done it. Since you are having them machined, you can make sure they machine them to run Hub centric for you.

    Jack
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  4. #4
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    It's fairly common for the Colorados (and discussed a bit on the forums) as they also have the larger center hole. I've not heard any complaints from the folks that have it done.
    08 Inferno Orange Z71 Colorado Crew Cab 4x4 I5, no lift
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by locrwln View Post
    I've never heard of a problem from those that have done it. Since you are having them machined, you can make sure they machine them to run Hub centric for you.

    Jack
    They are not hub centric wheels. The Toyota, and for that matter virtually all passenger cars and light trucks, use lug centric wheels, so the size of the center hole is irrelevant as long as it's not so big as to weaken the wheel. The lightest duty truck you'll typically find with hub centric wheels will be a 1-ton with DRW.

    JP
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
    They are not hub centric wheels. The Toyota, and for that matter virtually all passenger cars and light trucks, use lug centric wheels, so the size of the center hole is irrelevant as long as it's not so big as to weaken the wheel. The lightest duty truck you'll typically find with hub centric wheels will be a 1-ton with DRW.

    JP

    Um, you sure about that statement?


    http://stason.org/TULARC/vehicles/to...c-and-bol.html
    3.32 - What is the difference between "hub centric" and "bolt or lug centric" rims ? (All)

    Ninety Nine percent of all vehicles out in the world today utilze a "hub
    centric" rim.
    -Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away

    mark@expeditioneers.com

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
    They are not hub centric wheels. The Toyota, and for that matter virtually all passenger cars and light trucks, use lug centric wheels, so the size of the center hole is irrelevant as long as it's not so big as to weaken the wheel. The lightest duty truck you'll typically find with hub centric wheels will be a 1-ton with DRW.

    JP
    I realize that they are not hubcentric from the factory (aftermarket), but I was merely suggesting, that since he is getting them machined, he could make them so, since Toyota is big on hubcentric.

    Also, most every Toyota truck wheel (at least the 4runner, tacoma, LX450 and 80 series LC) is hubcentric and most even have tapered lug nuts as well (all four Toyota's that I have owned were like that), so they are double centric.

    My F350 is hubcentric with flat lug nuts, whereas my Chevy 2500HD is lug centric only. Both are single rear wheel.

    Jack
    2007 2500hd, Max/Alli, Hawk FWC (the new explorer)
    Build thread: http://www.expeditionportal.com/foru...07-Chevy-Build
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  8. #8
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    Any chance part of the center bore measures 108mm? On aluminum rims a router and a flush trimming bit works well of there happens to be a step in the bore the right size. Or guess you could make a jig that bolts to the rim with the proper side bore in it then used a bit with a bearing on the top that follows it. At least then you can make as many and you like
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  9. #9
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    Well, I called up the guy ready to buy the rims and go get them machined, "just sold them" he tells me. . I am so bummed, not sure I am going to ever find exactly what I want with a deal like that, again.
    Thanks for all the suggestions, I now feel confident to machine rims without worry.
    97' Toyota T100 SR5 4x4 Manual Trans.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
    They are not hub centric wheels. The Toyota, and for that matter virtually all passenger cars and light trucks, use lug centric wheels, so the size of the center hole is irrelevant as long as it's not so big as to weaken the wheel. The lightest duty truck you'll typically find with hub centric wheels will be a 1-ton with DRW.

    JP
    This is completely false.

    Any chance part of the center bore measures 108mm? On aluminum rims a router and a flush trimming bit works well of there happens to be a step in the bore the right size. Or guess you could make a jig that bolts to the rim with the proper side bore in it then used a bit with a bearing on the top that follows it. At least then you can make as many and you like
    This is a really bad idea. Not only are you likely to wreck your wheels, and not machine them properly, but it's also possible you're going to injure yourself attempting this.

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