Thread: Propane tank inside the vehicle

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    Tucson, Az
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    Default Propane tank inside the vehicle

    So, I'm going to need propane in my Van to run a heater in winter, a stove and for one of those eccotemp showers. So, my question is, why is it bad to have a tank inside. I mean, if the tank is mounted outside the lines are still run to the inside to power the necessary items. So, leaks could develope regardless. There really is nowhere that I want a tank mounted ourside and the ones that bolt to the frame are expensive. I have a spot in the back of the Van where a tank would fit perfectly. Anyway, I personally don't see the big deal but I'm open to suggestions why it may not be a good idea.
    Thanks,
    Matt

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
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    It's illegal in some places, check your local laws. I think when they are mounted in an RV it's inside of a ventilated enclosure.

  3. #3
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    NewBern, NC
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    when propane tanks warm up they often offgas from the vent - that would be one reason
    the other is probably more related to emergency fire personel being able to quickly disconnect it form the outside in the event of a crash etc.
    if you just use the little 1lbers then you should be fine.

  4. #4
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    You can have tanks inside the vehicle if you have them in a dedicated propane locker, a totally sealed compartment with the exception of venting at the bottom (propane is heavier than air). Do a search on "propane locker" to see how they're done.

    The lines run for propane are not the biggest problem. The bigger problem is leaks at the connections. Therefore, the correct way to do propane is to put the tank in a vented locker, hook up a solenoid valve to open and close the flow, and then have the propane distribution (if any) take place in the locker so that a separate line with no intermediate connection runs to each appliance.

    A lot of people don't want to use propane in their RV because of the perceived danger of explosion or fire. But if the installation is done to the proper standards, propane can be a safe and efficient fuel.
    Mike Hiscox

    2007/2012 custom Jeep Rubicon XV-JP motorhome
    2003/2014 custom Sprinter 2500 mid/tall motorhome
    2002 Toyota Sequoia Limited 4WD
    2006 Honda PS250 Big Ruckus Expedition Scooter

  5. #5
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    Does this apply to canisters that are not hooked up...transporting to campground for outside use.
    2008 Jeep Grand Cherokee CRD QT2
    GDE ECO Tune 241hp/440torque
    http://www.expeditionportal.com/foru...d-Cherokee-CRD

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by scootr29 View Post
    Does this apply to canisters that are not hooked up...transporting to campground for outside use.
    No, but it's important to make sure they are secure. You don't want the tanks to get dented (because some places won't refill damaged tanks) and you certainly don't want them as potential projectiles in a vehicle.
    Mike Hiscox

    2007/2012 custom Jeep Rubicon XV-JP motorhome
    2003/2014 custom Sprinter 2500 mid/tall motorhome
    2002 Toyota Sequoia Limited 4WD
    2006 Honda PS250 Big Ruckus Expedition Scooter

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kohburn View Post
    If you just use the little 1lbers then you should be fine.
    FWIW, if you want to avoid worrying about propane plumbing, using one-pound disposable cylinders is the way to go. No rules to follow except common sense. And for cooking (or lighting, if you're sufficiently old school), it'll probably be practical. If you're using the cylinders for heating water or any sizable space, it can get expensive and a refillable tank (they come as small as four pounds) will likely be more cost effective.
    Mike Hiscox

    2007/2012 custom Jeep Rubicon XV-JP motorhome
    2003/2014 custom Sprinter 2500 mid/tall motorhome
    2002 Toyota Sequoia Limited 4WD
    2006 Honda PS250 Big Ruckus Expedition Scooter

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhiscox View Post
    No, but it's important to make sure they are secure. You don't want the tanks to get dented (because some places won't refill damaged tanks) and you certainly don't want them as potential projectiles in a vehicle.
    10-4
    2008 Jeep Grand Cherokee CRD QT2
    GDE ECO Tune 241hp/440torque
    http://www.expeditionportal.com/foru...d-Cherokee-CRD

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