Thread: How to repair a synthetic line in the field.

  1. #1
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    Talking How to repair a synthetic line in the field.

    During the Expedition Trophy winch challenge/hill climb a synthetic line broke. We had some discussions about how to execute a trail repair on synthetic lines and one evening after the competition and classes a few of us decided to have a go at attempting a repair.

    Disclaimer, I'm by no means an expert but I had read about the repair technique from a link posted on the Winchline site. If you choose to repair your own winch line, you are doing so at your own risk!

    The detailed repair procedure is outlined here: Trail Fix for Synthetic Winch Line. This method describes and eye splice. We used the 10' of the line that had broken to test with and managed to repair it using electrical tape, a pen, a Swiss Army knife and some patience. Since this was a learning exercise and we did not have any thread/string handy we didn't stitch the end of the line together as suggested by Samson. The stitching is very important and Sampson has very good instructions on how to do so. See above link under Technical Ressources and Splicing Instructions. In this case we were using a 12 strand rope, yes I counted them! I believe that most winch lines are of the 12 strand rope.

    Another repair method described on Samson's site is the end splice should you break the line mid way. We did not attempt this repair, but it's relatively similar.

    Good luck with your repair!

    Cheers ,
    P

  2. #2
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    That was a very cool exercise, nice to have seen it actually done rather than just reading the instructions. Thanks for demonstrating it!
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  3. #3
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    ...and thus the old sailors term "getting the fid".

    As an old Coasty I did a lot of splicing of both single and double braid line. The method above is easy, and makes a good joint. It takes practice to get a thimble installed correctly - not to tight or to loose. Correct measurement is key.

    Butt splicing works great, but after continued use the line will get stiff at the braid. In addition to the stitching we also placed a whipping over the ends of the splices. The line repaired with a butt splice were replaced as soon as possible. Back in the early 80's it took a while - we, the USCG were funded in the DOT under the catagory of "other", so $$ was always tight.

    Mark
    I don't know what to say, but God Bless America.

  4. #4
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    All of these techniques address a near end of line break. What I wanted to know was how can I do a mid-span splice if the situation required it.

    What I learned was the Amsteel does not like knots, of any sort. And I brought a fair list of them to try to the test.
    You can do a weave type 'splice' though. Picture how the Redart Super Strap works.
    I used to swerve around my hallucinations, now I drive right through them.

  5. #5
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    If you can make the eye splice discussed in the first post, you should be able to do an end for end splice, as described in http://www.samsonrope.com/site_files/12S_C2_EndEnd.pdf
    The technique is not all that different. Both involve burying the tail inside another length of line.

    Another option would be to make two eye splices, one in the line remaining on the winch, and other in the broken piece. Then use the broken piece as you would an winch line extension. You may need to make 3 eye splices if you need to cut the hook or thimble off the old end to put it one the new one.

    paulj

  6. #6
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    I should have said that what I was looking for was a fast, as in knot fast, method that is just as temporary. I found it.

    I'll have to research the stitching part as I don't recall needing to do anything of the sort, but then it was a couple years ago that I went thru all of this.
    I used to swerve around my hallucinations, now I drive right through them.

  7. #7
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    Thanks P!!!

    Great thread!

    It was nuts watching that line go!.......Wire rope is much more intense when it goes!!!!


  8. #8
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    Talking Line repair

    No problem guys.
    It was a fun exercise to try out. Good to know it can be done relatively easily in the field.
    Cheers,
    P

  9. #9
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    Thanks for the post..I always wondered if splicing was actually possible.

    I'm curious about how the line broke in the first place--was the rope damaged at all, being pulled over something, or was the load just in excess of the rating (and if so, how was that accomplished?!).

  10. #10
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    Wink Broken rope

    Quote Originally Posted by Bongo Boy
    Thanks for the post..I always wondered if splicing was actually possible.

    I'm curious about how the line broke in the first place--was the rope damaged at all, being pulled over something, or was the load just in excess of the rating (and if so, how was that accomplished?!).
    Unfortunately I did not see the rope break in person, but this is what I heard. The line was loaded (single line pull) with an 60 series Cruiser pulling a Tacoma up a rock pile. The Cruiser had to move and when it backed up the loaded line came in contact with a sharp rock causing the line to fail. They had used a chafe guard but as luck would have it the rock missed the chafe guard by a few inches... From what I understand is was a nearly band new rope.

    Cheers,
    P

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