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Thread: Ranger - Bronco OR build current truck, opinions or advice???

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Northwest Colorado
    Posts
    820
    Take/send your heads to get ported and polished and at least bigger exhaust valves by a shop that knows and loves these motors. Get a good RV cam, mechanical secondary carburetor about the 625 cfm to 650 cfm range anything bigger is a waste of money for a stock to mild built 460 as the exhaust port in the stock heads is too restrictive for much bigger. I would not swap in a smaller gas engine if you live by mountains or plan to be pulling passes a lot, not to pick on flat landers but a lot of them don't realize big blocks reigned in the mountains (before the dawn of turbo diesels) for a very good reason. I have seen many small block engines meet their doom on the passes here in Colorado.


    I had an 87 F350 crew cab long bed 460 5 speed with 4.10's that was built to the above that would get 14 mpg on the highway empty and 8-12 depending on how much I towed.
    You have quads or dirt bikes for the tight stuff. I would use the truck as a base camp and explore out from there.


    A cummins swap would also be sweet, but as said doing it just for economy is not going to pay out very quickly if ever.
    1993 F350 Crew Cab Long Bed 7.3 IDI 5 speed 4x4. Currently stock except for the 255/85R16's.
    1983 GMC 6.2L Suburban with sm465/np205 with 1 ton axles, crossover steering, 52" front springs, and rear shackle flip. Has 285/70r17 STT's on H2 rims.
    1996 GMC Suburban K2500 6.5TD 4L80E
    -Running Biodiesel
    1965 2WD F100 7.5L with C6.
    1967 mustang coupe project on hold waiting for a garage or shop.
    1979 CX500 putt arounder.

  2. #12
    My finances arent in the best shape now and with a looming divorce not getting any better lol. I do like my truck a lot. Im not looking at doing hardcore trails and the trailer I have could be downsized. The range of the truck is a bit of a concern as my GF and I like to go exploring a lot and dont want the worry of brutal mileage. I've had a few 4x4s before and woudl condsider the DD & Trail truck but that will be waiting for $$$

    Here's a pic of my Current Truck and my old jeep


    Thanks again for the advice/opinions folks

    Shaun IMG_0201.JPG
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Escondido, ca
    Posts
    745
    Jayco Baja's have a gross weight rate of around 4500 to 5000. Are you sure it's really that heavy?
    http://www.jayco.com/products/campin...oorplans-specs

    A full size Bronco with a 351 will pull this easily.

    If you are in the middle of a divorces get that taken care of and done before you start any modifications or truck swap. Trust me, Best thing you could do is just take your current rig out and have fun in the areas it will go and save your $$ until the big D is over. Been there done that..
    Jerry
    1989 Chevy Suburban V2500, 350tbi, TH400/NP241 trans, 4:10 gears with locking rear diff. All stock for Now.

    Suburban build thread
    http://www.expeditionportal.com/foru...ad.php?t=34535

  4. #14
    1leg

    Ya I was thinking with the added weight of quad/dirtbike and fully loaded... maybe I'm way over estimating. I would think a Bronco would be able to manage it fairly well. As I said Its mostly just for exploring Fsr's etc and to be used as a base camp. Not gonna be hardcore wheeling it. That's what the toys are for

    As for divorce... Ya no or very lil $$$ for trucks and toys for next lil while lol.. oh well. All good I'm way happier Now than I was before


    Shaun

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    33
    Quote Originally Posted by 1leg View Post
    Jayco Baja's have a gross weight rate of around 4500 to 5000. Are you sure it's really that heavy?
    http://www.jayco.com/products/campin...oorplans-specs

    A full size Bronco with a 351 will pull this easily.

    If you are in the middle of a divorces get that taken care of and done before you start any modifications or truck swap. Trust me, Best thing you could do is just take your current rig out and have fun in the areas it will go and save your $$ until the big D is over. Been there done that..
    There is a tandem version that specs out at 7500lbs, I assume this to be the version he has. http://www.roamingtimes.com/rvreport...g-trailer.aspx Pretty heavy for a Bronco.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Vancouver, WA
    Posts
    170
    I have a 2003 Ranger FX4 Level II (manual trans and manual transfer case) with 4.0 engine. Towing and stopping are not its strong points. Especially stopping. (to be somewhat expected with discs and drums that fit under the factory 15" rims that mine has). Short wheelbase rigs (like a Bronco) aren't so fun either when you're towing a lot of weight. I used to tow a pop up camp trailer (4500lbs loaded) along with four people in my 2007 FJ Cruiser and it wasn't the most fun thing I've done when the roads got twisty, windy, rutted, or I needed to stop in any quick fashion. Big long trucks rule for towing.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    882
    Quote Originally Posted by 1 Bored Clerk View Post
    I have a 2003 Ranger FX4 Level II (manual trans and manual transfer case) with 4.0 engine. Towing and stopping are not its strong points. Especially stopping. (to be somewhat expected with discs and drums that fit under the factory 15" rims that mine has). Short wheelbase rigs (like a Bronco) aren't so fun either when you're towing a lot of weight. I used to tow a pop up camp trailer (4500lbs loaded) along with four people in my 2007 FJ Cruiser and it wasn't the most fun thing I've done when the roads got twisty, windy, rutted, or I needed to stop in any quick fashion. Big long trucks rule for towing.
    [HIJACK]

    You can easily put disk brakes on the rear. Check out my build thread.

    [/HIJACK]
    Scott


    NRA Life Member
    EMT - I

    1993 Ranger XLT V8, Modified
    2006 Ranger FX4 Level II, Modified

    Words from Albert Einstein: "I fear the day when the technology overlaps with our humanity. The world will only have a generation of idiots."

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Escondido, ca
    Posts
    745
    Quote Originally Posted by RedF View Post
    There is a tandem version that specs out at 7500lbs, I assume this to be the version he has. http://www.roamingtimes.com/rvreport...g-trailer.aspx Pretty heavy for a Bronco.
    Never seen that one before. thanks for the info.
    Jerry
    1989 Chevy Suburban V2500, 350tbi, TH400/NP241 trans, 4:10 gears with locking rear diff. All stock for Now.

    Suburban build thread
    http://www.expeditionportal.com/foru...ad.php?t=34535

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Behind the Orange Curtain, CA
    Posts
    944
    I suggest keeping the truck for towing, as the options you listed simply won't be able to match the towing ability of the 250. The Bronco is a decent choice, I have a friend with 2, one of which has crossed 250k miles recently, but I would not suggest them for towing. The wheelbase is what kills them, and the 351 is a decent, but not especially powerful towing motor.

    Also, if you're looking at the Bronco as a wheeler, have you considered that they're roughly the same width as your truck? I'm not sure how this pertains in your area, as I've only spent a week in BC with a little time on a couple logging trails to get to my hike on the WCT (another story for another time), but at least down here, width can be a big factor in trail performance. Most of our trails are designed for jeeps so Broncos and other Full-sizers usually don't make it out without the trail leaving its mark.

    As others have said, I suggest just keeping the 250 and using it for exploration in tandem with your toys. Then once the D is over, you can look into something for the smaller trails. It sounds like you're a Ford man, so maybe take a look at the Bronco II? It's basically an enclosed ranger, super cheap, decent mpg, and could be made pretty capable with the right mods. Or you can explore the thousands of other options, either domestic (jeeps, blazers, etc.) or import (pathfinders, Monteros, Troopers). This site will definitely give you some ideas, and guide you in the right direction.
    2002 Nissan Pathfinder 4x4 (R50)
    Leveled OME MD Lift, 245/75r16 Toyo AT-IIs, Rigid Duallys, Full 4x4parts skidplating, Bilsteins, Magnaflow exhaust, odds and ends.

    Gluten Free Expeditions since 2011

    "Some men climb mountains because they're there. Some men drive off-road because it's nowhere." - Tom Collins

    Allof75

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    So. California
    Posts
    658
    Quote Originally Posted by Allof75 View Post
    Then once the D is over, you can look into something for the smaller trails. It sounds like you're a Ford man, so maybe take a look at the Bronco II? It's basically an enclosed ranger, super cheap, decent mpg, and could be made pretty capable with the right mods.
    I'll 2nd that
    1990 Ford Bronco II, dual t-case, locked up on 35s

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