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Thread: Trailer drag wheels, yeah or nay? - Part Deux with pics

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    Cartoon City, Nirvana, USA
    Posts
    70

    Default Trailer drag wheels, yeah or nay? - Part Deux with pics

    Under trailer modification #2 I looked at departure angle. I may even add some up front for dragging the trailer over things but I'm unsure on that one yet. So here is trailer mod #2.

    I got some wheels for dragging my trailer over rocks. The frame is strong enough to just drag it over but I figured if I had wheels the frame would last longer, plus I can push the trailer backwards over rocks.

    So I tacked these puppies on to test it out for appearance. If you laugh at my welding I'll laugh along with you. One of these days I have to learn how to do this.

    So what say you? Keep them or leave them?



    This makes my departure angle almost straight up and down once the trailer is resting on the wheels. This also helps clear the tailgate, lights and hinges.







    Here is a couple of shots from under neath. I gyrated on the placement of the wheels on the frame and decided to flush them on the inside so I would gain the maximum amount of departure angle.





    It may have been nicer to use some larger pneumatic wheels but I think these will do and 6" rubber wheels would have been choice #2.

    Note: the installation was done by eyeball and holding them in place and tacking them down. Before I make these permanent I can easily take them off on straighten them out if it's really necessary.

    So what do you think?
    Michael W
    2007 Jeep JK Unlimited Rubicon.
    Trailer under construction.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Denver
    Posts
    412
    I like the idea, but personally I would be worried about coming over something and having it hang on the front side of the wheels because of the new hangup they create. Maybe you could enclose the front side of them like a ramp to allow them to drag up and over.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Cartoon City, Nirvana, USA
    Posts
    70
    Hmm, a little hunk of angle iron? Maybe?
    Michael W
    2007 Jeep JK Unlimited Rubicon.
    Trailer under construction.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    San Marcos, CA
    Posts
    1,280
    I would like to see an action shot. Michael this is very interesting. I have seen were your JK has been, now I would like to see your trailer in tow. Come on what else do you have to do this weekend. At least you will know if they work or not.
    Justin
    2006 Adventure Trailers - Chaser #15
    2012 Surly Moonlander
    2012 Nimbus Oregon
    2013 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Bellevue, WA
    Posts
    806
    Not a bad idea. One other thing you could do would be to get a hard pastic roller the full width of the frame. The only thing I could see wrong with those rollers is that they could get dirt, grim, and maybe rust in there and won't roll but drag with the trailer. I'm building my trailer right now so this is a great idea, let us know what works

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Cedar City, UT
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    358
    Personally, I'd ditch them in favor of some steel plate or angle iron, kinda a rock slider for a trailer. Just my $.02
    Curt Hall
    Treadlightly Master Trainer
    Leave No Trace Trainer
    ExpeditionUtah.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Guest of the northern barbarians Aberdeen
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    2,515
    No way jose.....

    even with the wheels on they will still hangup just due to them being proud from the frame rail 2"

    Then you'd tug on it and either rip the thing off, or twist the rear member

    and you've already ground off more paint than you'd loose in a year of off roading.

    If your really that worried.....

    I'd just add some 1/4" PTFE sliders......and when they wear out, buy a new one.

    Now if you mounted them inside the rear bumper and only had 3/8" of the wheels protruding...then it would improve over as is....the only thing to hang up on would be the wheels themselves.

    Fitted like that works fine on a flat road and a long assed RV.....


    Oh and one thing that you need to add while you've got your welder out is some angle iron and edge seal to seal your tailgate.

    Once you've taken your trailer offroad on dirt trails you'll understand, as even if you tarped over the top...you have what looks like 1/2" gaps which dust just loves, unpacking gear with a dust covering just sucks
    Last edited by UK4X4; 11-29-2007 at 04:08 PM.

  8. #8
    I'm assuming that the tube on each side is for a trailer jack or no? Why not simply mount the rollers under those tubes?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    The Nanny State
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    5,748
    FWIW PTFE would be a poor choice for a rub strip. It'll work great, but it won't last very long & impacts will tend to reshape it (it cold flows under pressure). Similarly most Polyethylene variants would be a bad choice, for the same reason.

    Acetal/Delrin/Celcon (pretty much all the same polymer) or Turcite (a very similar polymer) would be better choices for this. Can find it up on mcmaster.com Look for a impact acceptable version.

    Another option, though not as easily found in the States, is something called "Jobrock" (sp?). Lola Race Cars uses it for rub strips under their race cars. Stuff wears great in that application.

    Another option would be any of the High Strength Low Alloy steels that deal with impact OK (not all do). Core-10, Ten-X, T-1, AR, stuff like that. Pick an alloy and simply heavy tack-weld on a strip of it.
    Last edited by ntsqd; 11-29-2007 at 10:36 PM.
    I used to swerve around my hallucinations, now I drive right through them.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Guest of the northern barbarians Aberdeen
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    Now there's an answer from someone in the know..........

    Do you know anything about G10 material too ? as I'm considering it as a trailer panel material instead of aluminum due to its weight and strength....

    and also cost.

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