“Sierra Madre, Copper Canyon 2018”

bruceboogaard

The Land Lord
With the morning we will have a easy drive. We are reluctant to leave the hot springs, but we have many additional locations to visit on our adventure.

We have some of the group that are hiking the falls trail and others just relaxing.
Today we are spending the day on pavement to reach our next area to explore.

Arriving in town we head to the store to restock our supplies. We get our shopping done and head to the gas station before leaving town. Some of us are more gassed then the others, but as gassed as we were we hit the road again.

The question is, did Frenchie miss the turn again in town to get to the highway again? Well the answer is no since we were going into town to get lunch. We found a nice place to eat that was a step above the street venders, with the still great food. I even got us out of town without to many scenic routes.

The road in the valleys are straight for the most part as we cruse around the farming and ranches. That is the truth until it is not any more. The mountains bring twist and turns for a couple of more hours as we head west deep into the Sierra Madre mountains.

We reach the waterfall at Basaseachi, The water is only going about 750'-800' before it hits the wall below. It is truly spectacular though a even more spectacular when it goes the full 950'+ to the pool when it is running stronger. The falls are very dry this time of the year. We plan the adventure this way as crossing some of the rivers without bridges the route can be impossible with the rains and no dams to control the water level. (I had a trip where the river was up 15" deep and the detour was just over 400 miles around.)

We get a nice view of the falls and then head back to the campsite for the night. The stories this even are more true then the last nights stories, or were they?

We send the sheep away as we are tired and did not have time or inclination to count them.

Good Night,

Da Frenchman
Here’s the whole crew at Basaseachi and a shot of the falls.


Here’s a photo of the falls:




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

bruceboogaard

The Land Lord
With the morning we will have a easy drive. We are reluctant to leave the hot springs, but we have many additional locations to visit on our adventure.

We have some of the group that are hiking the falls trail and others just relaxing.
Today we are spending the day on pavement to reach our next area to explore.

Arriving in town we head to the store to restock our supplies. We get our shopping done and head to the gas station before leaving town. Some of us are more gassed then the others, but as gassed as we were we hit the road again.

The question is, did Frenchie miss the turn again in town to get to the highway again? Well the answer is no since we were going into town to get lunch. We found a nice place to eat that was a step above the street venders, with the still great food. I even got us out of town without to many scenic routes.

The road in the valleys are straight for the most part as we cruse around the farming and ranches. That is the truth until it is not any more. The mountains bring twist and turns for a couple of more hours as we head west deep into the Sierra Madre mountains.

We reach the waterfall at Basaseachi, The water is only going about 750'-800' before it hits the wall below. It is truly spectacular though a even more spectacular when it goes the full 950'+ to the pool when it is running stronger. The falls are very dry this time of the year. We plan the adventure this way as crossing some of the rivers without bridges the route can be impossible with the rains and no dams to control the water level. (I had a trip where the river was up 15" deep and the detour was just over 400 miles around.)

We get a nice view of the falls and then head back to the campsite for the night. The stories this even are more true then the last nights stories, or were they?

We send the sheep away as we are tired and did not have time or inclination to count them.

Good Night,

Da Frenchman
Here’s the whole crew at Basaseachi and a shot of the falls.


Here’s a photo of the falls:




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


It was at the parking lot at the Falls we noticed a pool of liquid under Larry’s van.


But he should tell that story.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

FrenchieXJ

Expedition Leader
With some hikes and last waterfall pictures complected, we prepare our vehicles for another leg of the adventure. We have the only must be at locations coming up and we need to get to our next location for the Chepe train. We load up the gear as we turn our thoughts and vehicles to Creel.

As we make the drive we head out of the falls the road which has had so many changes over the years. The dirt 2 track has been widened to 2 vehicles wide. They then put some pavement over the top of the graded road. The pavement is just about ½" thick and full of pot holes 8" deep. They have road signs that have distances on them and names of towns. This again was a big change over the last 35 years from the earlier days.

Well back to this years adventure. We will be climbing to our highest driving location during the whole adventure. We pass some “Got my attention, logging trucks” with small communities and logging mills. On this drive we pass some fields being plowed with live stock pulling the plows.

We make it up the switchbacks to the view locations. The views end on the horizon 75 miles away. The canyons are every where, the world ends at the last mountain range. We are high above all but the peak of the mountainside we are hanging on. We circle around to the other side of the peak and see the vast mountains rolling into the wide canyons and valleys. The road takes us winding in and out of tight canyons to reach the vast tree covered plateau. We drop slowly for many miles of rather straight road into town. In town we make the turn back into the hills and canyons as we get deeper into the vast entrance to the deep canyons known as the “Barrancas del Cobre” or “Copper Canyon”.

We reach Creel and we do the tour of the town with the important buildings and stores pointed out (restaurants, grocery, fuel and our camp). We get into camp and get settled for what will be our home base for a number of days. It is from here where we will board the train into some of the many canyons of the famed Copper Canyon.

We decide that a restaurant that CW had been to on a prior adventure with me would be the best place to eat in town. After a short walk around town with shopping and some site seeing done we all get some of our chores done.

I rent a cabin to use the shower for those camping, as some of the others also do. We seam to adopt a couple of new members to the crew. This small 4 legged mother with a totally cute puppy that looks nothing like the mother. Well in proven adventure after adventure the cute, gets to me and out comes the puppy food. Now as part of the gang they need names, Killer and Mom of Killer. Killer is about 6 weeks old (best guess) and dose not back down from any of the other dogs (he will bite and chew on any foot or ear he can reach). Killer is just learning to eat solid food and splits between Mom of Killer and the pile of dog food.

Bring that we are sitting in one place for a couple of nights the cell phones come out as we let the world know we are still alive.

The evening is relaxed as we will not be driving tomorrow. We do have some side chores to get done as get ready to take the train into El Fuerte, Sinaloa.

Good night,

Da Frenchman
 
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bruceboogaard

The Land Lord
Well, the next day the train was late by about 1 hour. We might of had too much coffee as we all got a little "ancy" on the train platform waiting for El Chepe. Frenchie and Marie broke out in dance to the Mariachi Guitarist that came by. I kept asking "How much longer?" so Frenchie finally told me that "I'm not sure, but if you put your ear to the track, you will be able to hear if the train is approaching." So I did! It was so amusing to the local Creelites, that they started putting money in my hat. Yeah. . . geezers busking in Creel!!!!
IMG_0146.JPG

Here's the full crew on the train platform:

IMG_0141.JPG
 

FrenchieXJ

Expedition Leader
Danger! Danger! Will Robinson!

We rise with the sun and the sounds of roosters and dogs. We will not cover the dog situation hapening on the front porch of the cabin I am staying at..

We get our coffee to help open our eyes. The morning is full of last minute packing for our stay far far away in “Never Neverland”. It is “Neverland” because we are told by our U.S. government that this is a place we should never never go to.
At this time load and play this song before you go any further!

We have made the decision to take head on the warning and “kick butt” of what ever lies ahead. We line up behind the leader for this section of the adventure. We are not concerned in the least as the strong, afraid of nothing leader steps up to the front and we step up behind his skin of iron and brute force. The leader has 100,000 pounds of force and weight enough to get us where we are going.

We have some time before we have to meet the train. We have arrangements made for a ride to the train station for our group. We get our vehicles all set for our departure. We get our fridges put into the cabins with the AC power to keep them ice cold for our return. The snacks are packed and we saying good bye to our newest members of our gang, Killer and Killer’s Mom. We let them know that we will be returning and to please watch the vehicles for us.

The time has come to load into the van for the ride to the train station. We make it and check that we have our tickets. We are on the platform waiting for the train to arrive. We have a long time friend of mine show up. He has been gracing the town of Creel for his whole life. We met about 25 years ago when he and a friend came to Margaretta’s where we were staying. He had his guitar and started playing for us and singing many of his songs for us.

From then on all of my adventures we would meet and present our group with some true Mexican music. At times I would join in without much coaching to play with the group. We called ourselves the “Cool Cats” those in attendance would refer to me as the cat who got his tail stepped on. We have been heard by travelers from around the world as the poor travelers who just were within ear shout of my voice.

Any way back at the platform and the train. With the music playing to a lively tune Marie and I look at each other and start dancing to the ever gathering larger crowd. Did we know what we were doing? Maybe not so much, but we were having fun.

As in the prior post, did we convince a subject to lay across the rails, putting their ear to the rail.? Note; we did not tie him to the tracks to do him in. Well sort of, but all in the interest of science of course. We wanted to find out if the train was coming and when. This works when the person putting their ear to the rail (Facing the direction the train is coming from) jumps up with a panic look on their face. This lets us know the train is very close.

Now do not think that this was not given back to us during the adventure. I believe that we all gave each other a little (or a lot) crap on the adventure. Everyone seams to get involved, generally as self defense.

The train arrived on schedule, “late” right on time. We got on and took our assigned seats. In a moment my friend and conductor from last year was the head conductor. We shared some pleasant words and he was back to work. I asked about another conductor friend and how the family was doing. He assured me that I would be back when I mentioned this was my fair well adventure.

The train rolls on down the track and we talk as a group for a while. I set in a seat for a short time then it is to my favorite riding location between the cars. This gives me a chance to switch between the side with the best view. I spend almost all of my time between the cars until we get to the lake crossing as we leave the mountains and canyons behind. I have ridden the train many times and never get tired of the views and the engineering and work to build the railroad through this rugged terrain.

The route goes from sea level to 8,000 feet, 37 major bridges (trestle’s), has over 87 tunnels, dose a 180 degree turn inside of a mountain, goes into a tunnel under a waterfall and dose a complete circle crossing over itself. Just some of the highlights of the route. This is just one of the reasions that Copper Canyon is on many peoples “Bucket List”.

Back at the ranch (train) we have wonderful vistas out of the windows, with canyons forest of pines trees. We climb higher to the highest point on the rails before we start out decent into the many canyons. We cross through many zones with oaks, madrone, manzanita, thorny forest and scrub lands.

We reach the costal plains at the southern end of the Sonora desert. Our arrival at the train station was we needed to grab our bags and get on the bus to the hotel. Arriving at the hotel we are checked in and start with a nice hibiscus drink. We reserve a table four our group for dinner. The food was again very good as we talked and joked with each other about our day and experiences. I slipper away to get to the ice cream store before it closed (last year I was 5 minutes late as they had closed just before getting there). I made it and got a very good and cold ice cream cone. Returning back to the hotel I met up with the group for the town tour.

Town is extremely nice and very Spanish. We decide to see the fort which the town was built around. This was cool but it was closed or was it? The guard offered to let us in if we would stay off of the roof. We agreed and went into the fort for the after hours tour. We head to the town square for the evening of site seeing and riding the train. This was a different train then the one we road during the day. This train took us all around town. We never got lost on the train ad we stayed on the tracks. I knew this as there were always tracks behind me. With some music we chugged around the main streets and back streets. We reach the square again and walk to see another fancy hotel, before returning back to our rooms.

Good night everyone,
Da Frenchman
 

Ace Brown

Adventurer, Overland Certified OC0019
Danger! Danger! Will Robinson!

We rise with the sun and the sounds of roosters and dogs. We will not cover the dog situation hapening on the front porch of the cabin I am staying at..

We get our coffee to help open our eyes. The morning is full of last minute packing for our stay far far away in “Never Neverland”. It is “Neverland” because we are told by our U.S. government that this is a place we should never never go to.
At this time load and play this song before you go any further!

We have made the decision to take head on the warning and “kick butt” of what ever lies ahead. We line up behind the leader for this section of the adventure. We are not concerned in the least as the strong, afraid of nothing leader steps up to the front and we step up behind his skin of iron and brute force. The leader has 100,000 pounds of force and weight enough to get us where we are going.

We have some time before we have to meet the train. We have arrangements made for a ride to the train station for our group. We get our vehicles all set for our departure. We get our fridges put into the cabins with the AC power to keep them ice cold for our return. The snacks are packed and we saying good bye to our newest members of our gang, Killer and Killer’s Mom. We let them know that we will be returning and to please watch the vehicles for us.

The time has come to load into the van for the ride to the train station. We make it and check that we have our tickets. We are on the platform waiting for the train to arrive. We have a long time friend of mine show up. He has been gracing the town of Creel for his whole life. We met about 25 years ago when he and a friend came to Margaretta’s where we were staying. He had his guitar and started playing for us and singing many of his songs for us.

From then on all of my adventures we would meet and present our group with some true Mexican music. At times I would join in without much coaching to play with the group. We called ourselves the “Cool Cats” those in attendance would refer to me as the cat who got his tail stepped on. We have been heard by travelers from around the world as the poor travelers who just were within ear shout of my voice.

Any way back at the platform and the train. With the music playing to a lively tune Marie and I look at each other and start dancing to the ever gathering larger crowd. Did we know what we were doing? Maybe not so much, but we were having fun.

As in the prior post, did we convince a subject to lay across the rails, putting their ear to the rail.? Note; we did not tie him to the tracks to do him in. Well sort of, but all in the interest of science of course. We wanted to find out if the train was coming and when. This works when the person putting their ear to the rail (Facing the direction the train is coming from) jumps up with a panic look on their face. This lets us know the train is very close.

Now do not think that this was not given back to us during the adventure. I believe that we all gave each other a little (or a lot) crap on the adventure. Everyone seams to get involved, generally as self defense.

The train arrived on schedule, “late” right on time. We got on and took our assigned seats. In a moment my friend and conductor from last year was the head conductor. We shared some pleasant words and he was back to work. I asked about another conductor friend and how the family was doing. He assured me that I would be back when I mentioned this was my fair well adventure.

The train rolls on down the track and we talk as a group for a while. I set in a seat for a short time then it is to my favorite riding location between the cars. This gives me a chance to switch between the side with the best view. I spend almost all of my time between the cars until we get to the lake crossing as we leave the mountains and canyons behind. I have ridden the train many times and never get tired of the views and the engineering and work to build the railroad through this rugged terrain.

The route goes from sea level to 8,000 feet, 37 major bridges (trestle’s), has over 87 tunnels, dose a 180 degree turn inside of a mountain, goes into a tunnel under a waterfall and dose a complete circle crossing over itself. Just some of the highlights of the route. This is just one of the reasions that Copper Canyon is on many peoples “Bucket List”.

Back at the ranch (train) we have wonderful vistas out of the windows, with canyons forest of pines trees. We climb higher to the highest point on the rails before we start out decent into the many canyons. We cross through many zones with oaks, madrone, manzanita, thorny forest and scrub lands.

We reach the costal plains at the southern end of the Sonora desert. Our arrival at the train station was we needed to grab our bags and get on the bus to the hotel. Arriving at the hotel we are checked in and start with a nice hibiscus drink. We reserve a table four our group for dinner. The food was again very good as we talked and joked with each other about our day and experiences. I slipper away to get to the ice cream store before it closed (last year I was 5 minutes late as they had closed just before getting there). I made it and got a very good and cold ice cream cone. Returning back to the hotel I met up with the group for the town tour.

Town is extremely nice and very Spanish. We decide to see the fort which the town was built around. This was cool but it was closed or was it? The guard offered to let us in if we would stay off of the roof. We agreed and went into the fort for the after hours tour. We head to the town square for the evening of site seeing and riding the train. This was a different train then the one we road during the day. This train took us all around town. We never got lost on the train ad we stayed on the tracks. I knew this as there were always tracks behind me. With some music we chugged around the main streets and back streets. We reach the square again and walk to see another fancy hotel, before returning back to our rooms.

Good night everyone,
Da Frenchman
Well, Frenchie one of your most prolific posts, certainly the most long winded, but not being there I’m sure I missed some important points. For example the Lonely Trumpeter was great but I missed the point. But never mind, I guess maybe it’s a stretch to assume your posts should always make sense. But hey,sense or not, I love your posts.
 

FrenchieXJ

Expedition Leader
Hi Ace,

We all had to be quiet about going into Sinaloa, because the government said we should not go their. "IL Silenzio" means "Silence" in Italian. Ace you know me well enough to know how close to impossible that is!

Dis be,
Da Frenchman
 
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FrenchieXJ

Expedition Leader
Rolling along!

We get up early for the need to get to the train station much earlier then yesterday. With a hardy breakfast to get us going. I will start by making this a shorter report today. If you read the post from yesterday backwards you will get the picture.

.smoor ruo kcab gninruter erofeb ,letoh ycanaf rehtona ees ot klaw dna niaga erauqs eht hcaer eW OK, No not that way!!! That is enough we get the picture. They put the locomotive at the other end and kept the other loco’s in the middle.

The ride was very exciting seeing the places from the other direction. Again I spent some time between the cars. After about 25 trestles (bridges) and 60 tunnels When we reached El Divisadero we got off for the fun of having our meal being prepared on the old 55 gallon drums. With just a 20 minute stop we need to eat fast and get on board for the remainder of rail adventure. El Divisadero is the location where the train is on the edge of the Mesa nearest the Canyon Urique. Canyon Urique is the deepest canyon in the Barrancas del Cobre and North America at 6,134'. It is deeper then the Grand Canyon in the U.S. and the Barrancas del Cobre is over 2.5 times larger then the Grand Canyon.

Well back with the Loco’s we board the El Chepe again for the more trestles, tunnels complete 360 degree loop, and the highest point (8,000') on the Barrancas del Cobre route from sea level through and over the Sierra Madre Occidental. The 406 miles from Chihuahua to Los Mochis the route crossed the Continental Divide three times. There are nearly 11 miles of tunnels and 2.25 miles of bridges. The highest bridge is 335' above Rio Chinipas while the longest is 1,638' long and 150' high above Rio Fuerte.

Arriving back at our vehicles we gather up our laundry and get ourselves ready for the next leg of our adventure. Shopping for food, fuel, supplies as well as visiting some museums a enjoying the unique town.

I start looking around for Killer and Killers Mom. After a hour they show up with a young girl. They have been playing in their cabin. Killer and mom get some more food and all is well. With bellies full the onky thing left to do is play with who ever will play with them. Life is good!

Good night everyone and keep rolling along El Chepe,

Da Frenchman
 
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Ace Brown

Adventurer, Overland Certified OC0019
Rolling along!

We get up early for the need to train get to the train station much earlier then yesterday. With a hardy breakfast to get us going. I will start by making this a shorter report today. If you read the post from yesterday backwards you will get the picture.

.smoor ruo kcab gninruter erofeb ,letoh ycanaf rehtona ees ot klaw dna niaga erauqs eht hcaer eW OK, No not that way!!! That is enough we get the picture. They put the local motive at the other end and kept the other loco’s in the middle.

The ride was very exciting seeing the places from the other direction. Again I spent some time between the cars. After about 25 trestles (bridges) and 60 tunnels When we reached El Divisadero we got off for the fun of having our meal being prepared on the old 55 gallon drums. With just a 20 minute stop we need to eat fast and get on board for the remainder of rail adventure. El Divisadero is the location where the train is on the edge of the Mesa nearest the Canyon Urique. Canyon Urique is the deepest canyon in the Barrancas del Cobre and North America at 6,134'. It is deeper then the Grand Canyon in the U.S. and the Barrancas del Cobre is over 2.5 times larger then the Grand Canyon.

Well back with the Loco’s we board the El Chepe again for the more trestles, tunnels complete 360 degree loop, and the highest point (8,000') on the Barrancas del Cobre route from sea level through and over the Sierra Madre Occidental. The 406 miles from Chihuahua to Los Mochis the route crossed the Continental Divide three times. There are nearly 11 miles of tunnels and 2.25 miles of bridges. The highest bridge is 335' above Rio Chinipas while the longest is 1,638' long and 150' high above Rio Fuerte.

Arriving back at our vehicles we gather up our laundry and get ourselves ready for the next leg of our adventure. Shopping for food, fuel, supplies as well as visiting some museums a enjoying the unique town.

I start looking around for Killer and Killers Mom. After a hour they show up with a young girl. They have been playing in their cabin. Killer and mom get some more food and all is well. With bellies full the onky thing left to do is play with who ever will play with them. Life is good!

Good night everyone and keep rolling along El Chepe,

Da Frenchman
The oil drum cookeries from three years ago.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

FrenchieXJ

Expedition Leader
Did I do that?

With the morning and a drive into the canyon with the first of our exciting drives into the sheer face cliff roads we head out. We decide that with the low flow of the water to skip our stop at the falls and push down the road.

While we are driving along, I point out some of the sites of previous camp sites over the years. We stop at a view point to see a cliff house that the Tarahumara still use to live in part time of the year.

We get a practice of some of the switch backs we will have coming. We drop into the upper end of the Rio Urique with a steep canyon walls and a high bridge. Rio Urique like many of the rivers flows north before making the first sharp left turn flowing to the deepest section of the canyons of the Barrancas del Cobre. Shortly after it makes it’s second left turn (south) to the town of Urique and eventually into the Rio Fuerte.

We eventually we reach the Batopilas Canyon and our first taste of the new wide safer road deep into the canyon. We stop at the upper end for everyone to get a look into the canyon. I point out the remains of the old single lane dirt road leading into the canyon. It still amazes me that was the route I took for so many years. We would have to look at each switchback for any oncoming traffic so we could find a wide switchback to get past each other.

We get past some of the many old mining locations on our way into the town of Batopilas. We take the new road along the river between the cobble stones and the buildings. The town was built in the 1600's and the streets were built for horse’s, mule’s and donkey’s and small carts. We are a bit larger and with a group we hose up the flow of traffic. Many a time in the past, we have had to turn on a side route, empty lot or back-up when we see a oncoming vehicle. We have had the police guide us the wrong way on a one way street when a 8' or 10' stake bed truck is parked loading and unloading. The canyon is so narrow that there are few other road choices. The road only made it to town in 1970, before that it was all by donkey, mule or foot.

We continue to our next goal. The community down river Satevo mission, church or cathedral. It has been called the “Lost Cathedral” for many years. (We pass the patrol of the drug lords between the two communities. I talk to them and we are on our way to Satevo.) The wood portion church was consumed in a fire and all records were lost. The size and style are of more then a mission or a church. The question is the amount of people was to small for a cathedral, so what is the history?

We get to the “Lost Cathedral” and my friend who I first saw when she was about 5 years old comes out to see us. She sees me and I get the warmest hug you co ever imagine. She is a special person as she suffers with seizures. She was just coming off of a bad couple of weeks, but she had to get the key to us to visit the “Lost Cathedral”. I am so bad with numbers I do not remember how old she has gotten to be. I ask her and she is now 27 years old and grown up since I first met her. She has started a new medicine for her seizures and hopes that it will work better then the last type she was taken. Unfortunately they do not have insurance and the meds. are expensive. I always give her some money to help with her medicine. Others in our group have given her money to help her along as well. Back in 2015 Wayne gave her a very large donation. She was so grateful she went to tears.

Back to the adventure we got to check out the buildings and grounds. When we have finished site seeing we are asked if we could give her dad a ride into town. We have the shorter steep route or the longer winding road to the river for the night. We take the longer route giving her dad a ride and go back to town before continuing. It is over the next mountain and we are on our way to “Rodeo” just as the sun is getting closer to setting. We continue through the valley, crossing numerous gullies. I follow the tire tracks through the cobblestones and into the water across the river. There is a nice sandbar I like to use for camping where we have a nice swimming hole. We set up camp and some of us head to the water. The temperature is a bit warm in the canyons where the elevation is around 1,500'.

Our evening meeting for the next days plans are to take a pole (yes, we did take a tadpole from the river), to break the tie.

We visit for a while and watch the moon rise. Then slowly we all head to our beds. It was a longer day and we need our beauty sleep (OK I need my beauty sleep).

Good night and do not let the frogs bite,

Da Frenchman
 
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FrenchieXJ

Expedition Leader
Correct. On this trip we stayed at the Rio Fuerte. The plan/schedule we had meant that we were to spend time in other locations we would need to move along. Actually Batopilas has a lot of great history and nice architecture. Over the years we had some incidents that has made me avoid the staying there. I am not apposed to it but I have to take into consideration the feelings of the others in the group. I am not afraid to travel in Mexico. I just let my feelings tell me when to move along, just like parts of the U.S..
 
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FrenchieXJ

Expedition Leader
The evening was just a bit froggy as the morning.

We wake with the morning sun. Today was to be a short day and with a drive of a couple of hour to our next campsite. The departure time was set to give us a relaxed start and a chance to catch our breath.

We follow along the river up over the hills getting gorgeous views of the river. We pass the bridge that was then it wasn’t. The bridge washed out shortly after it was built many years ago. This put us with a dilemma. The Urique river crossing we have used for a number of years was closed by tractor work which kept us from climbing up the steep grade back to the bridge road on the other side of the river. I was surprise to see work was actually being done on the bridge.

We took the old route across the river down stream and past what was one of the nicest campsites (until it got washed out) in a flash flood. The time has been good to the camp site and the sand has returned to the cliff under the trees with a flat nice campsite. We continue towards the rancho where they put in a cattle guard and removed the gate making the route easier for the gate closer..

The route along the river was in good shape for most of the way. As we climbed up over the ridge it was about the same as always (bumpy, rocky and rutted) as we head over the hills.

All is going well and then we make a decision to skip the campsite and move along. We make it through the Green Rocks mine and with some vehicles low on fuel so need to add fuel and take a lunch break., as this is the longest section between fuel stops. We decide to skip the town of Urique and head to Cerocahui for the night staying, at the Yogi Bear hotel. We get in and set up for the night with some getting rooms and others staying in their vehicles. We have the meals prepared for us in true Mexican family style and they did not know we were coming (heck we did not know we were coming in a day early either).

I went out a couple of times to check to see if my picnic basket was still in my vehicle. On the second trip it was gone! I looked around and did not find it, but looked up at Yogi and he looked very happy and content. I can not prove it in court but I believe I know where it went.

If anyone wants to add to the days story you can do as you wish.

Well with that we settle in for the night for a good night rest.

Da Frenchman
 
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FrenchieXJ

Expedition Leader
Today we can hang around or zip along.

We start with a nice family style breakfast. We have made our plans to do a part of my original route that We did on the first adventure into Copper Canyon about 35 years ago. We take and fuel up as we leave town and take the new road back to EL Divisadero. We pay to get into the adventure park and decide what we want to do, zip lines, cable car, rock climbing or just site seeing. Most of us took the cable car as others did rock climbing, zip line adventures.

We went out on a ledge for lunch! We ate at the restaurant hanging on the edge of the canyon lip. The food was good and at a decent price as well.

When we left we took the canyon route back to the hotel. This was on the north, south, east, west, above and below the railroad tracks. This route is much slower then the new paved road or the ridge line road (I used for many years). The communities and slower pace was much better then going fast and getting fixated on just driving the road. The unique rock formations the location of the mud hole where we helped to pull out a stuck local on our first trip. The school kids (and teachers) who came out for candy. This was fun going back to this time and place many from many years ago. The log bridges were have been replaced with concrete and much wider. We return to the hotel and relax before dinner.

We have a group of ladies who were all nursing students in school together meeting for a reunion that also come in behind us. We had a outside courtyard campfire (note; this was a controlled campfire) with singing and some wild dancing going on. Think about it this way, young kids do not care how the look when they dance, Teenagers are very conscious as to how they look dancing, adults are very sophisticated, Old Fart’s just let it all hang out!

The ladies were sure fun to hang around with. The fire was nice and it went out before morning. With my picnic basket empty I was sure that Yogi would not be back.

We made our plans for tomorrow and the departure time was set.

Good night,
Da Frenchman
 
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Ace Brown

Adventurer, Overland Certified OC0019
Today we can hang around or zip along.

We start with a nice family style breakfast. We have made our plans to do a part of my original route that We did on the first adventure into Copper Canyon about 35 years ago. We take and fuel up as we leave town and take the new road back to EL Divisadero. We pay to get into the adventure park and decide what we want to do, zip lines, cable car, rock climbing or just site seeing. Most of us took the cable car as others did rock climbing, zip line adventures.

We went out on a ledge for lunch! We ate at the reaturant hanging on the edge of the canyon lip. The food was good and at a decent price as well.

When we left we took the canyon route back to the hotel. This was on the north, south, east, west, above and below the railroad tracks. This route is much slower then the new paved road or the ridge line road (I used for many years). The communities and slower pace was much better then going fast and getting fixated on just driving the road. The unique rock formations the location of the mud hole where we helped to pull out a stuck local on our first trip. The school kids (and teachers) who came out for candy. This was fun going back to this time and place many from many years ago. The log bridges were have been replaced with concrete and much wider. We return to the hotel and relax before dinner.

We have a group of ladies who were all students in school together meeting for a reunion that also come in behind us. We had a outside courtyard campfire (note; this was a controlled campfire) with singing and some wild dancing going on. Think about it this way, young kids do not care how the look when they dance, Teenagers are very conscious as to how they look dancing, adults are very sophisticated, Old Fart’s just let it all hang out!

The ladies were sure fun to hang around with. The fire was nice and it went out before morning. With my picnic basket empty I was sure that Yogi would not be back.

We made our plans for tomorrow and the departure time was set.

Good night,
Da Frenchman
I know you can’t post photos but why not the rest of your gang? The zip lines, the rough ride back and the dancing ladies all need photos. Someone......


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