2013 Toyota 4Runner, Equipt Edition Build

Equipt

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OME puts the lift at 3", though with the heavy load rating it seems a bit higher than that at the moment. Especially in the back. Adding some equipment to it and a little settling in should bring it down soon. The tires were a 2" height increase, so 1" at the hub.

No plans for UCAs at the moment. I would prefer to keep it all Toyota spec unless I see that is not a possibility. Though it's only been a couple days, I haven't seen or felt any alignment concerns. Time will tell.

Cheers,
 

chmura

Adventurer
OME puts the lift at 3", though with the heavy load rating it seems a bit higher than that at the moment. Especially in the back. Adding some equipment to it and a little settling in should bring it down soon. The tires were a 2" height increase, so 1" at the hub.

No plans for UCAs at the moment. I would prefer to keep it all Toyota spec unless I see that is not a possibility. Though it's only been a couple days, I haven't seen or felt any alignment concerns. Time will tell.

Cheers,
Do you get any rubbing with those 285s? I'm pretty sure you do since lots of people that run 285s do a body mount chop and push the fender liner forward.
 

Equipt

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A little bit, yes. At full right turn to the stops I rub a bit on DS front and PS rear liners. At full left I rub DS rear and PS front. It is on the plastic liners and quite minimal. I am looking at my options to mitigate that right now.

Cheers,
 

zidaro

Explorer
Do you get any rubbing with those 285s? I'm pretty sure you do since lots of people that run 285s do a body mount chop and push the fender liner forward.
I have 275/70R18 (33x11) tires on my 5th gen with an ICON lift at about 2.5". No rubbing. on rear liners/body mount. Front bumper has been changed out so no knowledge there.
 

Equipt

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That just might be enough difference to do it. The 275 specs at 32.16" tall and 10.83" wide, and the 285 specs at 32.71" tall and 11.22" wide. It is a bit taller and a bit wider, and as I said rubbing is minimal. Annoying all the same but minimal. Tire inflation can vary these specs too.

Cheers,
 

chmura

Adventurer
That just might be enough difference to do it. The 275 specs at 32.16" tall and 10.83" wide, and the 285 specs at 32.71" tall and 11.22" wide. It is a bit taller and a bit wider, and as I said rubbing is minimal. Annoying all the same but minimal. Tire inflation can vary these specs too.

Cheers,
Have you fully flexed the suspension yet? At full flex you would get much more significant rubbing. Nothing annoys me more than tires rubbing things that are not suppose to. Mainly why I went skinny and tall on my setup plus the mpg savings.

I highly recommend you do the front body mount chop. Pretty easy thing to do.

Here is an example of a person doing the chop for their FJ cruiser (tacoma, 4runner, fj have basically the same style mount). It is recommended you weld in a metal plate after the chop to sustain the structural integrity of the mount.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x7bxNngBjz4
 
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Equipt

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I haven't flexed it out to see if there is significant rubbing when compressed yet. We'll see. Thanks for sharing the video link. They did a great job of detailing what is necessary for the FJ. I'll let you know what I find out.

Cheers,
 

KevinJ

New member
Thanks so much for sharing your build with us Paul!! I really, really appreciate the write ups explaining the philosophy and rational behind your build. Looking good!!!
 

Equipt

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Thanks for the insight and link. That helps a bunch. I have been looking at T4R for a while now and there really is some great ideas there. Some of the guys on that forum really have done great work.

Cheers,
 

Equipt

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Leather Interior

Leather Interior

One of the conflicts I had when choosing a model of 4Runner I wanted to go with was the choice between capability and comfort. Capability wise, the Trail Edition is the way to go in my opinion. There are a lot of systems integrated to get you over just about whatever you put in its way. But in Toyota's infinite wisdom they dressed the interior with a weather resistant fabric, without the option of leather at all. None. The SR5 and Limited have that option, but not the Trail. I have mentioned it before, I like my creature comforts when traveling days on end to a destination. And my boss has a criteria list as well. Leather and seat heaters are a must. I looked at the options and from what I could figure, it was going to be a whole lot less expensive to add leather and heat to the Trail than to add the off road capabilities to the Limited or SR5. So that is the path we took.

It didn't take a lot of searching to figure out that Katzkin was the company to work with. OEM leather replacements for Ford, Chrysler, Jeep, and others available through the dealerships no less. Their reviews are stellar, and I have looked at their product at SEMA a couple times. I spoke to a couple friends and they all said "Katzkin". So Katzkin it was. I looked at their website (www.katzkin.com) and went through their vehicle application process about a dozen times. There are a myriad of options available. Single or multi-color options, trim packages, embroidery, seat heaters, perforation, etc. They have suggested color options for most vehicles as well. I decided on a black leather solid color set with a Ice Grey Detail stitching, perforation in the center area, smooth finish, and a set of seat heater kits for the front. Katzkin does not offer their product directly, so I went through a company called Superior Auto Restyling (www.ShopSAR.com). I ordered the set on their site, and an installation kit which had all sorts of goodies in it. A representative from SAR called me and went over the order clarifying a couple things and suggesting that I didn't need the whole install kit unless I was doing the door panels too. I hadn't planned on it, so we revised the installation kit down to just a pair of hog ring pliers, package of hog rings, and a leather conditioner. He saved me $50 right there. The entire kit came to around $1150 shipped. $300 of that was the two seat heaters, so if that isn't your bag you could save some there too.

I received the custom leather interior set within a week, just as promised. Everything was there, except instructions. They don't offer instructions as the majority of their customer base is OEM or aftermarket upholstery shops that they have pre-screened. Both of which should know what they are doing. Not some guy in Arizona digging into a brand new truck with not upholstery experience what so ever. Enter.... Me! I watched a couple of the install videos you can see on You Tube of auto shows installing the covers and I didn't see anything I couldn't manage. Again, one of my goals with this truck is to learn as much about it as I can. This is part of that learning process.

I started on the back seat covers, so just in case it was obvious I was over my head I could load up the whole bundle of goods and drive the truck to the local upholstery shop with my checkbook in hand. Once over the nervousness of tearing into a perfectly fine and brand new interior, the process wasn't that bad. I found the key is to not be in any hurry at all. Look it all over and undo stuff once, remembering each step as you have to reverse the process putting it all back together. I removed the entire back row of seats and moved them to a carpeted work space so I could roll them over without worry of damaging the seats. Understanding the various clips and fasteners involved was the trick. The first rear seat took twice as long as the second one. Each had their unique frame clips and around a dozen hog rings that needed to be clipped and removed. The rear set went pretty well, so I moved to the fronts.

4R Front Seats on Driveway.jpg4R Drivers Seat undone.JPG

I would consider the rear seats a college level 150 course. The fronts were an upper level course. You use all you learned in the first course and then apply a new set of techniques. They tore down pretty much the same, but installing the seat heaters was the kicker. The instruction set was all pictures. It took a while to understand all the nuances that each picture had. Variances for creases in the upholstery, cutting the heaters to size, carving out foam for the heater elements, cable channels, etc. Again, first one took twice as long as the second. I counted 7 points of blood letting on my hands and arms when it was all done, from pulling and tugging and wedging and pushing and stuffing the covers on and off of the steel frames. Not as much swearing as I expected though. The whole process of front and rear seat replacement took me approximately 15 hours. A pro shop could have had it done in a day. It isn't difficult, but it does require a level of patience and attention to detail to accomplish.

4R Front Seats Leather Installed.jpg4R Rear Leather Installed 2.jpg

I am really happy about how the seats turned out. The leather is high quality and it fits the OEM seats frames like a glove. A couple areas will need a little time to adjust and smooth out, but that is expected. I still need to wire the seat heaters in. They come with a wiring harness requiring switched 12V to run. My plan is to adapt the harness to run off Toyota OEM seat heater switches that have existing holes in the center console. That is for another day. Right now I am enjoying the leather in my Trail.

Cheers,
 

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xjaugie

Adventurer
The seats look great. I gotta say it takes a lot of gumption to tear apart the interior of a new truck. Not so sure I would have the nerve. Nice job.
 
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