2020 Defender Spy Shots....

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naks

Active member
Nah, in all likelihood, it will be the e-diff as fitted in the D4/D5/RR/RRS, which you can't manually control, and which locks progressively as it detects loss of traction.

Also, I don't think LR will allow you to manually control/select the features, it will all be automated according to the Terrain Response setting.
 

DieselRanger

Well-known member
Nah, in all likelihood, it will be the e-diff as fitted in the D4/D5/RR/RRS, which you can't manually control, and which locks progressively as it detects loss of traction.

Also, I don't think LR will allow you to manually control/select the features, it will all be automated according to the Terrain Response setting.
I can manually control mine with Terrain Response 2. I can lock the center diff with a button. Didn't get the locking rear diff option as I would have had to go up a level and sacrifice payload with the folding 3rd row and lose the full sized spare.
 

DieselRanger

Well-known member
I don't disagree that the new Defender will have better command of the terrain than the old one-frankly, I think it'd be hard for it not to be better than the old one with open differentials and no articulation, my point is that no matter how great the traction control is in the new Defender, it's still not as a good as lockers because you enter every situation needing to lose traction and the momentum that comes with it before your traction control kicks in. Maybe LR has changed that with the new Defender. Until the technology of traction control can get to a point where it can read the terrain and sense that a loss of traction is coming and engage prior to loosing traction, it will never beat lockers. However, I do give LR credit for trying to drive technology that direction and I'll be celebrate it when it happens- as I understand it, traction control just isn't there yet. I think it'd be amazing if the Defender is capable of reading terrain in front of you, recognizing that you are about to lose traction and engaging power in all wheels prior to the loss; until then I think lockers will always beat traction control.
The D5 has both lockers and TC - no reason to expect the Defender won't as well.
 

naks

Active member
I can manually control mine with Terrain Response 2. I can lock the center diff with a button. Didn't get the locking rear diff option as I would have had to go up a level and sacrifice payload with the folding 3rd row and lose the full sized spare.
Oh, I didn't know this - interesting that LR allowed more manual control with TR2

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DieselRanger

Well-known member
Hydrogen is a energy storage medium, same as batteries but without the limitations of range and environment. Non-dispatchable solar and wind generated electricity with electrolyser's are used to convert water to hydrogen. Fuel cells then convert that hydrogen back to electricity and water. Byproducts? Water.

Infrastructure is currently an issue but that is being developed as fuel cell commercial truck development is moving forward. DHL and FedEx are both in early deployments stages. Nikola is building out 700 stations for their OTR trucks that have a range of 800 miles.
Electrolysis can be used to create hydrogen and oxygen, but the bulk of industrial hydrogen today is produced as a byproduct of natural gas extraction. Additionally, fresh water is already becoming a precious resource, and it's not clear what the plan is, if any, to store or use the excess oxygen produced through electrolysis. "Breathing" is unfortunately only a very small part of the answer. There's also no plan on how to re-capture the water re-created in combusting the hydrogen.

And finally, since Nitrogen makes up over 80% of our atmosphere, unless you supply that electrolyzed oxygen in a closed loop for the hydrogen to combust with, a conventional air-fed hydrogen engine also produces high amounts of oxides of nitrogen due to the high combustion temperatures. NOx, you'll recall, is what got Volkswagen in trouble, and it's a pollutant explicitly controlled by EU6 and EPA Tier 2 regulations.
 

mpinco

Expedition Leader
Electrolysis can be used to create hydrogen and oxygen, but the bulk of industrial hydrogen today is produced as a byproduct of natural gas extraction. ......
Agreed on current hydrogen production. Still cleaner than burning gas/diesel but too expensive. The move is to leverage non-dispatchable solar and wind that currently is unused. It's called Green Hydrogen. Hydrogen cost point then drops.

H2V and GE Commit to Massive Production of Hydrogen by Electrolysis
By FuelCellsWorksDecember 7, 2018

".........The H2V INDUSTRY project will provide green hydrogen, produced by electrolysis of water and renewable energy sources, guaranteeing a zero carbon footprint........

........Currently, 95 percent of hydrogen is produced from fossil fuel sources resulting in pollution, whereas green hydrogen produced from water and renewable power sources guarantees a zero-carbon footprint. H2V INDUSTRY has chosen the electrolysis of water as the innovative method to produce green hydrogen. The electrolysis of water involves using electrical energy to separate water into hydrogen (H2) and oxygen (O2), thereby converting electrical energy into chemical energy. This green hydrogen can be stored for later use on the network, produced where there is a high concentration of renewables power sources or transported to the consumption sources. It can also be directly injected into industrial processes for decarbonization. .........."
 

REDROVER

Explorer
Why doesn’t Land Rover use Ford Powerstroke diesel or Duramax diesel in the new defender and most of there new vehicles?
Anyways they gonna he powered by one of the tow trucks using those engine in USA.

A vehicle that is being tested is not being moved around by a tow truck, they drive around to TEST.

They can’t fool anyone.
 

mpinco

Expedition Leader
China's Father of Electric Cars Says Hydrogen Is the Future
Bloomberg News
June 12, 2019, 3:00 PM MDT Updated on June 13, 2019, 4:09 AM MDT

"His vision to make China an electric-vehicle powerhouse revolutionized the global auto industry, cementing a move away from the combustion engine. Now, Wan Gang says get ready for the next game-changing moment.

The world’s biggest car market is set to embrace hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles the way it did EVs, Wan, who’s been called the father of China’s electric-car movement, said in a rare interview in Beijing on June 9............."
 

DieselRanger

Well-known member
Why doesn’t Land Rover use Ford Powerstroke diesel or Duramax diesel in the new defender and most of there new vehicles?
Anyways they gonna he powered by one of the tow trucks using those engine in USA.

A vehicle that is being tested is not being moved around by a tow truck, they drive around to TEST.

They can’t fool anyone.
Actually, Ford's "Powerstroke" diesel is exactly the TdV6 diesel used in Land Rovers, but with a reinforced crank and maybe one other change to give it a tow rating of over 10,000 lbs. That engine is a joint venture between Pugeot and Ford and has been used in various incarnations in Europe for over a decade.

Ford owns the Powerstroke branding so they can slap it on whatever they want.

And never forget, the goal of testing is to find the limits and exceed them to learn something about the test subject. The Defender is still in development, so it's reasonable - even preferable - to break it then, so you can engineer out the failure mode beyond reasonable constraints.
 
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REDROVER

Explorer
Lol powerstroke used on Ford F series trucks has near 900lb torque, it’s absolutely not the same powerstroke used on Land Rover.
it’s only used on ford heavy duty trucks and commercial vehicles.
 

DieselRanger

Well-known member
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DieselRanger

Well-known member
The new diesel on the F150 is the same engine used on current Discoveries and Range Rovers ( 3 litre V6 Powerstroke). The new Defender is using a different engine. A straight 6.
The Ingenium straight 6 is gas/petrol. As far as I can tell there have been no inline 6 diesels demo'd or tested in the Defender, but an inline 6 turbodiesel Ingenium has been rumored for some time.
 
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