2020 Defender Spy Shots....

Red90

Adventurer
They stated in one of the previous announcements it would have an inline six in both petrol and diesel. The diesel would have a turbo plus an electric supercharger.
 

DieselRanger

Active member
They stated in one of the previous announcements it would have an inline six in both petrol and diesel. The diesel would have a turbo plus an electric supercharger.
That would be great, just haven't seen any evidence of it yet. 300hp / 500lb-ft would be perfect for the Discovery, should move the D110 quite nicely as well.
 

JackW

Explorer
They stated in one of the previous announcements it would have an inline six in both petrol and diesel. The diesel would have a turbo plus an electric supercharger.
I think the electric supercharger will be on the Range Rover - from what I read about a year ago there will probably be three HP ratings on the six cylinder engines - probably corresponding to the three models (Range Rover, Discovery and Defender).
I was asking one of the corporate Land Rover guys a while back when the Ingenium engine was first introduced in 4 cylinder form if we would see a five cylinder in the Defender and his response was "why not a six?" My response was that works for me - but he wasn't going to tell me any more.
I was given the strong impression that the six cylinder Ingenium will be available in the Defender in both gasoline and diesel versions. It will probably be around 250 HP with around 450 Ft-Lbs of torque (and maybe a little more). An article I found about 1-1/2 years ago speculated that the base 4 cylinder engine will be around 163 PS / 380 NM with versions of 180 PS / 430 NM and 240 PS / 500 NM. Somewhere I saw numbers for the 6 cylinder diesel from 375 to almost 500 HP.

 

mpinco

Expedition Leader
As long as those power numbers are without electric motor drive assist I would consider them. Recall the previous method of spec'ing the latest powertrain:

The P400 PHEV is advertised as "The efficient new Range Rover and Range Rover Sport P400e PHEV models provide sustainable performance by combining a 296hp 2.0-liter four-cylinder Ingenium gasoline engine with a 114hp (85kW) electric motor and an advanced 13.1kWh lithium-ion battery giving a total available power output of 398hp. "

That's not a continuous 398 hp and the associated torque.
 

DieselRanger

Active member
As long as those power numbers are without electric motor drive assist I would consider them. Recall the previous method of spec'ing the latest powertrain:

The P400 PHEV is advertised as "The efficient new Range Rover and Range Rover Sport P400e PHEV models provide sustainable performance by combining a 296hp 2.0-liter four-cylinder Ingenium gasoline engine with a 114hp (85kW) electric motor and an advanced 13.1kWh lithium-ion battery giving a total available power output of 398hp. "

That's not a continuous 398 hp and the associated torque.
The Range Rover Sport HST has a different setup. It's got the Ingenium Inline-6 gas engine with a 48-volt electrical system, electric supercharger, and an electric generator-motor connected to the drivetrain via a belt. Technically it's more of a mild hybrid / KERS and I guess it mostly kicks in during acceleration and then recovers some energy on braking.

Personally, I don't understand why nobody has engineered a locomotive-like setup where a diesel powerplant operates at peak efficiency to turn an electric traction engine. Diesel range with electric torque and responsiveness, and like a locomotive you can spec the emissions controls to virtually eliminate all emissions since the diesel would run in a fairly narrow RPM range regardless of vehicle speed and load.
 
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mpinco

Expedition Leader
The Range Rover Sport HST has a different setup. It's got the Ingenium Inline-6 gas engine with a 48-volt electrical system, electric supercharger, and an electric generator-motor connected to the drivetrain via a belt. Technically it's more of a mild hybrid / KERS and I guess it mostly kicks in during acceleration and then recovers some energy on braking.

Personally, I don't understand why nobody has engineered a locomotive-like setup where a diesel powerplant operates at peak efficiency to turn an electric traction engine. Diesel range with electric torque and responsiveness, and like a locomotive you can spec the emissions controls to virtually eliminate all emissions since the diesel would run in a fairly narrow RPM range regardless of vehicle speed and load.
Agreed on the locomotive system design. That said, locomotives and associated traction motors are large and have a completely different design point. While over the road truck EV's are emerging that is also a different design point. I wonder if passenger vehicle electric motors (small) have a duty cycle limitation in that they can provide high torque for relatively short duration and must be throttled back for continuous operation and high reliability. In reality we are early in the evolution of EV's.
 
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Buliwyf

Viking with a Hammer
The Range Rover Sport HST has a different setup. It's got the Ingenium Inline-6 gas engine with a 48-volt electrical system, electric supercharger, and an electric generator-motor connected to the drivetrain via a belt. Technically it's more of a mild hybrid / KERS and I guess it mostly kicks in during acceleration and then recovers some energy on braking.

Personally, I don't understand why nobody has engineered a locomotive-like setup where a diesel powerplant operates at peak efficiency to turn an electric traction engine. Diesel range with electric torque and responsiveness, and like a locomotive you can spec the emissions controls to virtually eliminate all emissions since the diesel would run in a fairly narrow RPM range regardless of vehicle speed and load.
Converting rotation force to electricity, then back into rotational force, you'd lose at least 20% fuel efficiency. Sure you'd be in a perfect powerband, but not enough to make up the conversion losses. It won't happen until the ICE is replaced with a fusion reactor.

Diesel electric DC trains were originally created to get rid of gear boxes. Semi's need 18 speeds to stay in an efficient powerband. Imagine what a train would need. Later trains switched to AC generators to eliminate wheel spin, as the motors can never speed up, unless the engine allows.

KERS and ERS show much more promise.
 
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blackangie

Active member
They stated in one of the previous announcements it would have an inline six in both petrol and diesel. The diesel would have a turbo plus an electric supercharger.
Cool, got a link? Makes sense to do both

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blackangie

Active member
New York spotting and another UK

First expedition rack seen on SWB from memory

I'm guessing height would allow fold back ragtop roof.

Looks like LR will be going all out on the accessory front



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Paddler Ed

Adventurer
Spoke with my parents back in the UK, and by the sounds of it there are going to be quite a few more sightings as they've been told to get them out on the road testing them.

They've already seen one (West of Birmingham) on the road, so they're out and about.
 

blackangie

Active member
Curious if there any rumours of a 130 style defender (pick up truck)? Would definitely give the new Gladiator a run and make for some interesting bed topper/camper options.
My hunch is multiple variants come along with BEV and SPORT/SVX/SVR after they build up cash from 90/110s

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