$46,000 Dollar Overland Trailer?

Hilldweller

SE Expedition Society
Didn’t want to highjack the other thread, but who pays $46,000 dollars for a tent trailer? Are there really people out there who are willing to pay that much? Would a bank finance such a purchase?
We camped a couple of weeks ago with a couple that had one.
Remarkable trailer, actually. Like an Autobot sorta; things popped and folded out all over the place.
They're members of the forum, very nice, fun to camp with.

I don't throw stones. Some of my purchases tend toward the precipice of excess at times too.

You can see the trailer here and there in my slideshow of our trip.

 

ttengineer

Adventurer
It is a pretty complete awesome unit. I'd sooner pay $46K for it than buy anything selling for $23K. You get what you pay for.
I think this statement is mostly true in the majority of industries.

However, we have not yet found the status quo in the “overland” scene and I do not feel that it holds true here.

Due to the increasing “cool factor” I think a lot of products are insanely over priced currently.

Trailers are notoriously over priced.

LED light bars are another example.



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ebrabaek

Adventurer
I think it really depends on what you want.
The earthroamers can get to 3/4 mill.
I have 10k in my off road trailer that will do just about anything the 40k will..... I am super stoked with my 10k unit and are going on the 4th year....and I am sure that patriot owners are every bit as happy. As are the earthromers as well.
 

Roaddude

Long time off-grid vanlife adventurist
No offense to Earthroamers, but I always thought those who own them as individuals with considerable disposable income, whereas the trailer crowd was looking for an economical alternative to a high priced adventure rig that they could pull with their daily driver. I just wonder what the market is for a $46,000 tent trailer. Don’t mean to be critical, just curious.
They're real works of art, and extremely well-thought out and rugged as all hell. Though way out of my price range.

I bought my American-made XVenture XV-2 (military trailer mfg w/long heritage) from Exploration Outfitters in OK, who now sells the Patriot Campers in the US. My XV-2 was the last one he had before going exclusive with the Patriots. I got a hell of a deal. Got a nice walk around, too, of the Patriot Campers they first had a couple years ago when I picked up my XV-2. Really amazing pieces of work.

Exploration Outfitters have been doing really well with them. Patriot Campers have won Camper Trailer of the Year in Australia several years in a row. That's no mean feat in a country known for their extreme-duty off-road trailers. Their marketing, too, is second to none. Check out their Our Heritage page for an idea how far they've come in six or seven years.

There is definitely a market for these at that price range, though as I wrote, way out of my budget, and I admit to having a hard time understanding spending that amount of money on something used a few weeks a year. I see more and more of them on the road now as I roam North America.

As the "overland" world and the meaning of the word itself becomes stretched beyond recognition, it becomes more and more appealing to a wider range of folks. It stands to reason that more folks with bigger pocketbooks find ways to get involved.


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billiebob

My Uncle drove a government issued Jeep in Europe
I have 10k in my off road trailer that will do just about anything the 40k will
This is what a hot over priced market gets, first several guys build their own which is great and
unfortunately a few incompetent fabricators jump on the band wagon of instant profit building crap which is not great.
 

luthj

Engineer In Residence
In aerospace we deal with low volume high reliability products/components/parts every day. In some cases there are only a few thousand of a part made (total, ever). Its not unusual for high quality cast/machined assemblies (nothing exotic), to cost $25k. This is something that weighs 25lbs, and is the size of a backpack.

Once you move away from square sided, commodity part based, wood filled designs, costs go up. Add in manual labor for low production volumes, and its easy to reach $40k.

Is it a good value? That's up to the buyer/market to decide. I will say that having your trailer break an axle, or the door fall off mid trip sucks when you only get a couple trips a year. If the trailer lasts 30 years, vs maybe 15 for the cheaper models, does that make it more valuable?
 

bglenden

Member
Some people have more money than time, and others vice versa. Fortunately in our society you can trade one for the other as you prefer. Based on the number of camper makers who have gone bust I suspect the real-world margin on those trailers is not as high as people think, but I look forward to people disagreeing with me and proving me wrong by starting a company and introducing competing products into the marketplace (I'd like something like that for less money too).
 

TGK

Member
Some people have more money than time, and others vice versa. Fortunately in our society you can trade one for the other as you prefer. Based on the number of camper makers who have gone bust I suspect the real-world margin on those trailers is not as high as people think, but I look forward to people disagreeing with me and proving me wrong by starting a company and introducing competing products into the marketplace (I'd like something like that for less money too).
I agree. I doubt the builders of many of these smaller "overloading" campers are soon to join the 1%. Quality does cost money and there's nothing wrong with making a decent living for oneself and family. If it's a niche market one is selling into, not realistic to build an assembly line. I'm often willing to pay more for "quality, although sometimes that willingness runs smack into my budget. Then it's becomes a juggling of priorities.
 

calicamper

Expedition Leader
I agree. I doubt the builders of many of these smaller "overloading" campers are soon to join the 1%. Quality does cost money and there's nothing wrong with making a decent living for oneself and family. If it's a niche market one is selling into, not realistic to build an assembly line. I'm often willing to pay more for "quality, although sometimes that willingness runs smack into my budget. Then it's becomes a juggling of priorities.
Time used vs cost. $’s divided by hours. If RV buyers and boat owners, ATV owners did the math. There would be a whole lot less owners and lots of rentals. LOL Likely allot more financially stable individuals too.
 

akhummer

New member
In aerospace we deal with low volume high reliability products/components/parts every day. In some cases there are only a few thousand of a part made (total, ever). Its not unusual for high quality cast/machined assemblies (nothing exotic), to cost $25k.
Seems like most of these trailers use off the shelve components. Sheet metal, drawer slides, lighting, HVAC, power systems, fabric, axles, hubs, wheels, etc. But...no doubt a bunch of thought went into the design. I wonder how long it takes to produce one of these.
 
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