Advice Needed:: Tacoma owner considering a ZR2

#31
I had a difficult time deciding between these two trucks. The Colorado is really refined with great curb appeal. I am a dieselphile because of the technology and torque. The 2.8 Colorado is comfortable, efficient, and impressive if it tows what they say it does. It is a little slow off the line but sounds good and rides great. The interior was the downfall for me. You can bend the back seat over with your bare hand and I could not stomach the thought of putting my hand on this everyday:
colorado shift.jpg
1995 Trans Am called and wants its gear selector back.

It was shallow and I'm sure its a great truck but ultimately got a TRD OR with manual trans. Its a dog below 3300 rpm but if you rev it, it will deliver. The fuel mileage also stinks. However, the interface of the tech inside is perfected, it is fun, quiet, and nimble, and it has manual transmission. This is my first Toyota and there is some brand bias going on here, but classics are classics for a reason and the developing world depends on Toyota trucks. The new Ranger will probably get it right.
 
#32
Yep. 4Runner SR5 wheels are dirt cheap on eBay.

For the record...I really like Toyotas, but the stories that they are the only reliable trucks is stupid. Over at 355nation there are tons of guys with well over 200K on their Colorados.
(y)

They aren't the only reliable trucks out there, that is for sure! My father-in-law is a Chevy man, he runs his up to 275-300K...puts something like 30-40K on them a year.

Most of the new vehicles will go up to 200K without much fuss.

My Tacoma didn't start giving me issues until the 200K mark...it now has 368K on it, and I have a long laundry list of repairs to get it there. Within the last 4 years, it has new CV's/seals, shock rebuild, rear shocks and spring pack bushings, ball joints, tie rods, steering rack, clutch, fuel pump, starter rebuild, valve cover gasket, cam shaft seal, injector o-rings, water pump, oil cooler seal, on its 3rd timing belt, cat and O2 sensors, radiator, brake booster, 3rd member rebuild, drive shaft rebuild, driveshaft carrier bearing, rear axle bearings and seals.

As you can see, my Toyota is no longer reliable. It has never left me stranded, but parts wear out no matter the brand.

Just did its' 2nd rack last week...and now the front diff is puking fluid...think the 4WD sensor might of got smacked and cracked the plug, but haven't had time to tear into it yet...that is the plan today. I no longer trust my truck, it is old and has a bunch of miles on it, it will break down more in the future...and I'll just keep on fixing it until it gets wrecked, or rusts out. Cause as much as I look at new trucks, gawd damn they cost a lot, $30-40K for something that isn't going to all that different than what I already have other than being new...much rather keep the money in the bank.

Anything can be made to last if you're willing to put the effort and money into it. Majority of people don't keep their vehicles much pass 150K...so they deem them reliable. Pretty rare that people see how long they can keep them going...as with this thread, the OP sees something new and shiny, and it ready to ditch his perfectly good paid off truck even though it will put him into debt...better off making payments into an investment...than tossing it at something you'll loose money at.
 
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#35
"But what are these "GM issues" you are talking about. I know that new platforms tend to have more problems versus older platforms. But I do think there is some brand bias being exhibited here. You both dislike GM's reliability "issues." "
Brand bias??? Nope. I am not a Toyota fanboy, but I do own a 2G Tundra. I also own a GMC Z71. Just sold a GM SUV, and still own another one, which I will probably sell next year. The list of stuff that has failed on the the GM products is as long as my arm, including leaking intake manifolds, cracked exhaust manifold, exploded differentials (2 on different vehicles), exploded A/C compressors, blown A/C resistors, multiple toasted A/C computer modules, burned switches, interior trim falling off, headliner delaminating, cracked plastic radiator tanks, horribly ineffective brakes that necessitated hydro-boost upgrades on vehicles that should have come from the factory with them, peeling clearcoat, and... The Toyota is not perfect, but is way better than the GMs. I also have a Dodge Power Wagon, and it is the best of the bunch from a reliability and function standpoint.
 
#36
Just take a look at a 10 year old (if you can find a running one) Chevy Colorado.

A gas Toyota is considered broke in at 200K
No, a gasoline Toyota w/ 200k is considered in need of maintenance and a potentially new engine. It's a great platform, if maintained and run properly, but all these claims that these engines will run for 500k miles with nothing but basic maintenance are embellishments. Some of Toyota's engines might make it that far without a major overhaul....most won't.


KBB.com
2010 Colorado very good condition 6k-8k
2010 Tacoma very good condition 10.5k-13.5k

Nobody cares......it's a Colorado. :giggle:
You're comparing the old generations though. I'd be interested to see how the new generations of each vehicle compare, especially considering the diesel option for the Colorado. Also, Tacoma's resale value is verging on insanity. It's a good truck, but some of the prices that used trucks go for just make no financial sense.


It's funny to me how much value everyone is putting into a diesel in a mini truck. There is little to no advantage of diesel over gas in a small, non-towing truck. And, willing to pay a premium price point for it.

The Colorado diesel is a slug. You have to spend even more $$$$ to tune it and tap dance around the computer gremlins.
Have you driven the 2.8l duramax? It's a very good engine with sufficient pep. It certainly won't win any drag races, but then again neither will the average gasoline pickup. That "slug" of an engine, in a 4wd Colorado, can get 30 mpg highway. It can also tow up to 7.7k lbs. Which midsized gasoline pickup offers comparable performance?

I don't need or want a truck that can pull fast 0-60 times and quickly get up to 80 mph for highway cruises. Regardless of which engine type we're talking about, that's not what these trucks were meant for. I'm totally content to trade a few seconds in my truck's 0-60 time in order to get better efficiency and towing characteristics.
 
#38
Ya know...don't think anyone has mentioned. If the OP would look at the lower trim models of the Chevy diesel, rather than the ZR2 he might break even. (or loose not as much)

See a bunch out there in the lower $30K range.
 
#39
No, a gasoline Toyota w/ 200k is considered in need of maintenance and a potentially new engine. It's a great platform, if maintained and run properly, but all these claims that these engines will run for 500k miles with nothing but basic maintenance are embellishments. Some of Toyota's engines might make it that far without a major overhaul....most won't.




You're comparing the old generations though. I'd be interested to see how the new generations of each vehicle compare, especially considering the diesel option for the Colorado. Also, Tacoma's resale value is verging on insanity. It's a good truck, but some of the prices that used trucks go for just make no financial sense.
Haha you are in denial - There is a reason why Toyota is consider one of the best overlanding platform in the WORLD and holder of many world records. Have you check out the resale value of an old 80 series Toyota lately.

https://expeditionportal.com/top-10-used-overland-vehicles/
https://roadtrippers.com/stories/longest-road-trip-ever
 
#40
Haha you are in denial - There is a reason why Toyota is consider one of the best overlanding platform in the WORLD and holder of many world records.
This coming from the person who has "landcruiser" in his screen name, which of course proves that there is absolutely no bias in his views and statements.


Have you check out the resale value of an old 80 series Toyota lately.
I have actually. You can find a good number of them with high mileage (150k-250k) going for $8k-$9k, which is only a few steps away from scrap yard values.

With the proper maintenance and repairs, the underlying platform is good for many more years of service.

But at that mileage, the inline 6 gasoline (which wasn't exactly problem-free to begin with) is nearing the end of its useful lifespan. Hence why you can find them for such cheap prices. I think the LC-80 with a high-mileage engine would be a prime candidate for an engine swap (GM smallblock, 4.7l Toyota V8, 2.8l Cummins crate engine) for exactly that reason.
 

Bubblegoose1

PNW Off-Road & Expedition
#41
No, a gasoline Toyota w/ 200k is considered in need of maintenance and a potentially new engine. It's a great platform, if maintained and run properly, but all these claims that these engines will run for 500k miles with nothing but basic maintenance are embellishments. Some of Toyota's engines might make it that far without a major overhaul....most won't.




You're comparing the old generations though. I'd be interested to see how the new generations of each vehicle compare, especially considering the diesel option for the Colorado. Also, Tacoma's resale value is verging on insanity. It's a good truck, but some of the prices that used trucks go for just make no financial sense.




Have you driven the 2.8l duramax? It's a very good engine with sufficient pep. It certainly won't win any drag races, but then again neither will the average gasoline pickup. That "slug" of an engine, in a 4wd Colorado, can get 30 mpg highway. It can also tow up to 7.7k lbs. Which midsized gasoline pickup offers comparable performance?

I don't need or want a truck that can pull fast 0-60 times and quickly get up to 80 mph for highway cruises. Regardless of which engine type we're talking about, that's not what these trucks were meant for. I'm totally content to trade a few seconds in my truck's 0-60 time in order to get better efficiency and towing characteristics.
As stated in a much earlier post. I have driven the diesel. It is a slug and sounds like a desperate tractor. Haven't drive one since, and not missing it at all. My 3 daily drivers of these fleet trucks have complained about poor power, but they are stuck with them until they get cycled out as soon as I possibly can. And these are standard 4x4 trucks, without larger tires and added overlanding equipment installed.

You're not convincing me they are worthy one bit. If the only up side to these is some additional MPG (the 3 we run only average 25 MPG on long distance commutes) and towing up to 7.7K pounds, which no overlander will do, then these are a great overpriced buy for someone. I'd put my money elsewhere.
 
#42
This coming from the person who has "landcruiser" in his screen name, which of course proves that there is absolutely no bias in his views and statements.




I have actually. You can find a good number of them with high mileage (150k-250k) going for $8k-$9k, which is only a few steps away from scrap yard values.

With the proper maintenance and repairs, the underlying platform is good for many more years of service.

But at that mileage, the inline 6 gasoline (which wasn't exactly problem-free to begin with) is nearing the end of its useful lifespan. Hence why you can find them for such cheap prices. I think the LC-80 with a high-mileage engine would be a prime candidate for an engine swap (GM smallblock, 4.7l Toyota V8, 2.8l Cummins crate engine) for exactly that reason.
Correct I have bias actually strong(y) but I have experience to back it up, you? :unsure: Read my sig;)

I wont cloud the thread anymore but @McFly2003 will be better served from a cost and quality point to keep the Tacoma and hand it down to his kids in its later years.
 
#45
I had a difficult time deciding between these two trucks. The Colorado is really refined with great curb appeal. I am a dieselphile because of the technology and torque. The 2.8 Colorado is comfortable, efficient, and impressive if it tows what they say it does. It is a little slow off the line but sounds good and rides great. The interior was the downfall for me. You can bend the back seat over with your bare hand and I could not stomach the thought of putting my hand on this everyday:
View attachment 443148
1995 Trans Am called and wants its gear selector back.

It was shallow and I'm sure its a great truck but ultimately got a TRD OR with manual trans. Its a dog below 3300 rpm but if you rev it, it will deliver. The fuel mileage also stinks. However, the interface of the tech inside is perfected, it is fun, quiet, and nimble, and it has manual transmission. This is my first Toyota and there is some brand bias going on here, but classics are classics for a reason and the developing world depends on Toyota trucks. The new Ranger will probably get it right.
That seriously is the interior pic of a 2018 or 2019 gm vehicle? Wow that’s bad if it is.