Air compressor

#2
I suspect the reason you are not getting any replies on this thread is that you asked about an air compressor but posted a link to a CO2 tank. Totally different animal. Looking at the truck in your sig, I'm guessing you might be running 35s so need a lot of air. Can you be more specific about tire size and use patterns?
 

FJOE

Adventurer
#3
Viair. I use the 300P, and it's a great piece of equipment. Get the Viair upgraded hose though, because the one that comes with it (though it never failed) seemed pretty brittle. They have a new 400P, and it apparently has an automatic shutoff. I have had this thing since 2013 in several different countries and it has never failed. Get a spare intake filter and some spare fuses and keep them in the bag too.
 
#5
Personally, being that I have an inverter big enough to run a small 120v compressor, I just carry one of the $100-ish pancake compressors on trips. It's fast for filling up tires, is usually enough to re-seat a bead if needed and can handle light use with an impact if necessary.
 
#6
I have been using a 12v puma portable compressor for the last few years. Originally bought it for my rock crawler with 39" tires. But since it is portable ive used it for my jk with 35" tires and now is in my truck tool box since i use it more for traveling and is my future overland vehicle

Sent from my SM-G935V using Tapatalk
 

Herbie

Rendezvous Conspirator
#7
Pick your budget. The MV-50 and variants is the "bang for the buck" leader.

I run a Viar 400 for a bit more oomph, and I've been happy, but my tires are relatively small. If I was running huge tires, I'd insist on something with a continuous duty cycle rating and a much bigger CFM rating.
 
#8
I am using a ViAir 450 P and it worked perfectly on a recent off road/trail trip to Utah. Could inflate all four tires (285/70/17) from 30 psi to 55 psi in less than 20 minutes.
 
#9
I have a viair 200 psi OBA on my truck, love it for the engine brake, hair horn and airing up tires. I had an issue of it not holding pressure and running continuously. I did extensive troubleshooting and thought the compressor was toast so I ordered another one and replaced the alleged bad one. Same problem! I finally found a split air line that I could not get too or spray with soapy water so now I have a spare 200psi rated compressor. It has a 100% duty cycle at 100 psi so I made a portable out if it with a 125psi pressure switch, 200psi safety valve and a connection fitting. It turns on and off automatically as needed to keep the air line is pressurized. Instead of a typical cig. lighter connection or alligator clips I used power pole connections to mate with what I already have on my truck, no need to raise the hood.

 

jgaz

Adventurer
#10
I have a viair 200 psi OBA on my truck, love it for the engine brake, hair horn and airing up tires. I had an issue of it not holding pressure and running continuously. I did extensive troubleshooting and thought the compressor was toast so I ordered another one and replaced the alleged bad one. Same problem! I finally found a split air line that I could not get too or spray with soapy water so now I have a spare 200psi rated compressor. It has a 100% duty cycle at 100 psi so I made a portable out if it with a 125psi pressure switch, 200psi safety valve and a connection fitting. It turns on and off automatically as needed to keep the air line is pressurized. Instead of a typical cig. lighter connection or alligator clips I used power pole connections to mate with what I already have on my truck, no need to raise the hood.

Nice job on the conversion. Simple and solid
 
#11
My wife bought me one of these for my recent birthday: https://www.specialopstools.com/air-armor-m240-portable-12-volt-tactical-air-compressor-kit/ ($129.99 & photos from their website). It was on my birthday wish-list.

Since I just got it, I've only used it once so far to air-up after a little off-roading, and it worked great (not as fast as my CO2 tank, but I'm wanting to replace my CO2 tank with something I can move from one vehicle to another). I was done filling back-up way before some of the others were done. It uses clips to the battery, and the cord and hose (which clips onto the valve stem so you don't have to stand there holding it) were plenty long. I like the fact it is all contained in an ammo can, and easily moved from one vehicle to another (it is heavy though). So if we take my wife's Subaru on a trip, I can just toss it in the back. Or my 4x4 truck. Or my Jeep. Or my other Jeep (you get the idea).

Their spec sheet says "100% duty cycle for 15 minutes" - not sure exactly what that means other than after 15 minutes of continuous use I should give it a break. Plenty of time to air up my Jeep/truck tires from the mid/upper teens to 32 psi (285/75/16" tires). It also comes with a box of extras (which I haven't even looked at yet but picture from their website). I carry a Safety Seal tire plug kit, but there's room in the ammo can to add your choice of tire repair stuff.

I ran a 10 pound CO2 tank for years (now it sits in my flat fender - my "other Jeep" where it started out). It is quiet, very fast, and my hose was long enough to reach all four tires without having to pull the tank out of the tank's mount. CO2 works great... until you runs out of CO2. The cylinder is bulky, takes up space (I own three mounting brackets), and is heavy. And when empty, you've got to find a place to refill it. All doable, but a pain when you run out when you start filling up your 4th tire (happened to me) and you have to ask for help. And since my CO2 tank is pretty (sounds weird yes), I'm not into just swapping out CO2 tanks, so some places where I lived they sent their tanks out to be filled, so there was a little bit of a turn-around time (and the concern I might not get my pretty tank back). And if it has been a while since they were pressure tested, that's another expense.

Sadly, I don't get out enough to justify an expensive air compressor set-up. I think this Air Armor one will do me just fine. It might not be the fastest one out there, but I don't think I'll be the last one done airing-up either. Now if I was going to South America, I'd get a much more expensive set-up.

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#12
A more recent Expedition Portal article on air compressors from 2018
https://expeditionportal.com/the-overland-journal-air-compressor-test/

I personally own the Viair 400P and so far it's worked great. No complaints here. Could it be faster? Sure but for the price it was hard to beat. I do plan to go with on-board air at some point with the ARB single. One thing I might do is finish the Viair with anderson plugs and have a hook up to my battery instead of using alligator clamps.
 
#13
I didn't read the entire thread but just wanted to say that buy the biggest air comp you can afford. If you have to save up for a month or two, do it. I've never, ever heard someone say "gosh, this air comp is just too darn fast". I always hear "well ****, this POS name brand air comp just slowed down after the second tire. Sorry dude, I don't think it'll fill up your tires after it gets done filling mine". :)

If it doesn't cost north of $300, it probably isn't worth the time. When you have a nice air comp, with some serious thick gauge wires and giant clamps, you're more apt to air down and then air back up. Otherwise, you beat the **** out of your occupants, rig and shake up the beer in the process. I see this over and over again in this hobby of ours.

My 80 has a york which is simply awesome. The 4Runner has the OB2 Air Zenith http://shop.air-zenith.com/aircompressor.aspx permanently mounted in the engine bay. You need a large motor to run an air comp 100% duty cycle. This large motor will require lots of juice and a separate cooling fan. The OB2 is rebuildable and is used by the car slamming dudes. You know, the cars that jump up/down at the intersection! Think about their air requirements and the amount of on board storage they have to have for their hobby!
 
#14
Been using a MV50 for over a decade. Small, as fast as other ones its size unless you really pay $$$. I am in a Wrangler so space is at a premium. Most of the time airing up people are BSing and nobody is working that fast anyway. If you have space get a A/C powered one and an inverter. The inverter has to be big enough put it can serve many purposes. If you really need power get a belt driven one that runs off your engine.

I usually air down to about 10-15 psi, depending on the terrain, and back up to about 27 psi. I have used my MV50 with 33x12.5 up to 35x12.5. I am never the last one and other I wheel with have nicer compressors. Mine is mounted and wired permanently. If time is a concern mounting and wiring it permanently will save you more time then buy a more expensive faster compressor you have to unpack and hook up.
 
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#15
I've thought about mounting an MV50 where the ABS stuff would be mounted in the engine compartment of my TJ. There's an unused tray under the steering column that would be a perfect spot for it. I'd love to see pictures if anyone has done so and hear of their experience.

I read somewhere (probably on the internet, so it must be true) that mounting them under the hood caused them to overheat.
 
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