Ambulance Camper/ Expedition Rig Conversion FAQ

sub-terminal

New member
Air valve

Does anyone know what this air valve was used for? There are 2, one on each side of the rear of the box. From what I can tell they go to a small compressor in the rear outside compartment which goes back into the main panel and connects to another small compressor. Not sure what would be used at the back that needed to have these. Would be great if I could use the compressor to put air the tires but it probably isn't strong enough.
 

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patoz

Expedition Leader
Does your rig have air bags on the rear axle as part of the suspension? If so, then they are more than likely to inflate the bags. A lot of the newer Ambulances now also have a pneumatic lowering system that allows the back of the unit to 'squat' to make it easier to load and unload the stretcher.

Just follow the air hoses and see where they go. There should also be some switches on the control panel in the cab that turn the compressors on and off, and should be labeled accordingly.
 

k9lestat

Expedition Leader
If it has the lowering feature for loading and unloading there will another switch usually a rocker type along the back doors. The ones I have seen are on the right side.

Sent from my QMV7A using Tapatalk
 

patoz

Expedition Leader
If it has the lowering feature for loading and unloading there will another switch usually a rocker type along the back doors. The ones I have seen are on the right side.

Sent from my QMV7A using Tapatalk

Good point!
 

sub-terminal

New member
Does your rig have air bags on the rear axle as part of the suspension? If so, then they are more than likely to inflate the bags. A lot of the newer Ambulances now also have a pneumatic lowering system that allows the back of the unit to 'squat' to make it easier to load and unload the stretcher.

Just follow the air hoses and see where they go. There should also be some switches on the control panel in the cab that turn the compressors on and off, and should be labeled accordingly.
Thanks for the info, I appreciate it. You were correct, it goes to the airbags. I thought I followed the correct wires at first but upon closer inspection I see that I didn't!
 

Augdog1964

New member
Just bought a 1995 E-350 7.3 Powerstroke Quigley 4x4 conversion with 65k miles!

Now the work begins...

Questions for the hive:

1) What is the best means for converting the rear wheel duals to singles... I know I have to keep the load rating up... so Toyos are needed.... I also saw this site:

http://www.ricksontruckwheels.com/drw-to-srw.php

What say ye sages of the Ambox.

2) The Quigley 4x4 conversion will need more height... what is the best kit and means to do so? Like to avoid new driveshaft(s) but it definitely needs more height.

Thanks all!
 

flightcancled

Explorer
I am weakest in this area, but Ken's thread has some good info on this. With the limited travel in those rigs he is able to run 37 inch H1 Hummer tires with no major modifications. Now its important to not that he is running a narrower box (Mini-Mod), so the tires would wind up further in on a standard box.

Where are the photos!?
 

patoz

Expedition Leader
Now the work begins...

Questions for the hive:


2) The Quigley 4x4 conversion will need more height... what is the best kit and means to do so? Like to avoid new driveshaft(s) but it definitely needs more height.

Thanks all!

You need to talk to Chris Steuber of Ujoint Off Road. He does complete conversions or sells his kits, so you can do it yourself. He's probably going to suggest you get rid of the problematic Quigley conversion, and replace it with the kit he has designed, installs, and sells for DIY people. His kit uses the F250 or F350 straight front axle which is much stronger than the coil spring mess Quigley uses.

Here is his build thread: http://www.expeditionportal.com/forum/threads/55074-UJOR-Build-Thread

And his Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Ujoint-Offroad/170935869592316?ref=br_tf

After you read through the build thread, I think you'll see what I mean.
 

ujoint

Supporting Sponsor
Thanks for the plugs fellas!

There's no easy way to get lift under a Quigley without changing a lot, the scariest rigs I've driven have been modified Q vans. Biggest hurdle is getting the alignment right since Q arms have no adjustment. I've seen adjustable arms but they make other things interfere, etc. Others will disagree with me on this of course but we've fixed a lot of Quigley and know that they work.
 

Waltzing Matilda

Adventurer
Great thread- very helpful/educational

In the opening post you wrote: "What should I look for when picking out an ambulance?
Typically builders look for a post 1992 Ford E350 or E450 with a 7.3L Diesel engine."

Why do you say post-1992? What changes happened vs. earlier?

I'm asking because tomorrow I'll be looking at an '87 Econoline E-350 w/an International Harvester (non-turbo) diesel, 8 cylinder engine. Dual fuel tanks (40 gal capacity), 2-WD.

Selling point (?): Only 45K miles on it, nice ambulance interior, was used for commercial/electrician work most recently (solar installs).

I've only seen photos- it looks very clean so far.
But despite the low miles, are pre-1992 vehicles a bad choice? Why/why not?
And is this size vehicle a decent choice for towing a trailer?

Thanks for a very helpful discussion!

image.jpg
 

6ale

New member
I too am curious about the post '92 recommendation. I currently have my eye on a 1989 Ford XLT ambulance van. The ad says it's an automatic v8 7.3 diesel (with 4x4!) and an odometer reading 163,000 miles.

It looks really cherry, but I'm not very mechanically inclined so wouldn't know what to look for aside from what it mentions in the ad: recently retired and kept in the bay, so no rust.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

-Ale
 
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