Any longtime riders quit for good?

#46
Well it's been decided. Going to get a couple of maintainence things finished up such as changing the oil and putting in a new battery and get an advertisement ready. And I can make an ad for some gear as well. Thanks everyone for the advice, it has been something to think about for sure and some good points both ways.

I think in a couple of years I will start a vintage project more aimed twords off-road use. Maybe a vintage Triumph or a Yamaha DT1. Always liked those!
Believe you made the right decision, if you aren't feeling it, you aren't feeling it. No need to force it.


If you ever do decide to get back into it...kinda like when they take a modern bike and make it look old with some bits (even though it looks terribly uncomfortable to ride :) )

http://www.bikeexif.com/2017-yamaha-wr450f-iron-cobras

2017-yamaha-wr450f-iron-cobras-3.jpg
 
#47
All right, not trying to be a total dips@%t here but I genuinely want to hear feedback from riders on this: What is the appeal of riding a motorbike for overlanding/exploration purposes?

You're exposed to the elements.
Your traction is very limited, to the point of being a hindrance, in many situations.
Your payload is extremely limited.
Crashes seem to be inevitable, rather than an exception to the norm. I'm not saying all of them will be catastrophic, but every rider I've talked to has mentioned having at least a few crashes under his/her belt.

I get the appeal of riding a bike for weekend cruises. But for traveling into new, and potentially remote, areas, I just don't understand the appeal of a motorbike.
 
#48
Man! I'm exactly in that same place! I'm 55, been riding pretty steadily since I was in my teens. There were a 2-3 years when I was younger where I just couldn't afford to have a bike, but other than that I've always ridden.

As others have said, it's different now. People just don't pay attention when they drive and it's freaking me out! I've been talking all winter about selling the bike in the spring. The line I use is "just walk away while I still can". I do have the Jeep and a Honda S2000 to fill the gap, but it will still be hard. My current bike is a R1150GS with over 100k miles on it that I bought new - my first brand new bike. I've had so many great rides on that bike! But I just don't want to end up dead or hospitalized at the hands of some damn texter...
 
#49
All right, not trying to be a total dips@%t here but I genuinely want to hear feedback from riders on this: What is the appeal of riding a motorbike for overlanding/exploration purposes?

You're exposed to the elements.
Your traction is very limited, to the point of being a hindrance, in many situations.
Your payload is extremely limited.
Crashes seem to be inevitable, rather than an exception to the norm. I'm not saying all of them will be catastrophic, but every rider I've talked to has mentioned having at least a few crashes under his/her belt.

I get the appeal of riding a bike for weekend cruises. But for traveling into new, and potentially remote, areas, I just don't understand the appeal of a motorbike.
To be honest with you, no it isn't practical to ride a motorcycle. Part of the deal with it is that you have to make smart choices on what to pack, and be smart on how you travel. It's the same reason why people like backpacking. Just take a couple of things and figure it out if you have extra needs along the way.

On the other hand... Why is driving a 4,000 pound vehicle practical, especially if it is just yourself? Just playing devils advocate of course. If I had someplace to be a couple hours away by myself, it was cheaper and faster to just hop on the bike and get there. And if you have to cross some River in the Amazon, you are going to have much better luck tying a bike to a canoe than a Range Rover to 5,000 canoes.
 

pyrate

Rollin' along
#50
All right, not trying to be a total dips@%t here but I genuinely want to hear feedback from riders on this: What is the appeal of riding a motorbike for overlanding/exploration purposes?

You're exposed to the elements.
Your traction is very limited, to the point of being a hindrance, in many situations.
Your payload is extremely limited.
Crashes seem to be inevitable, rather than an exception to the norm. I'm not saying all of them will be catastrophic, but every rider I've talked to has mentioned having at least a few crashes under his/her belt.

I get the appeal of riding a bike for weekend cruises. But for traveling into new, and potentially remote, areas, I just don't understand the appeal of a motorbike.
I’ve had much greater experiences with people on a motorcycle than vehicles. Yes, you are in the elements and have limitations on what you can bring. It made me rely upon talking to the local people more than sequestering myself in my truck. It also made me slow down and experience more.

I think many locals also understand your vulnerability on a bike. Not that they will drive differently and spare you an accident but if you make it to their town in one piece, they tend to help out with what you need more.


Smoke signals still work...
 
#51
All right, not trying to be a total dips@%t here but I genuinely want to hear feedback from riders on this: What is the appeal of riding a motorbike for overlanding/exploration purposes?

You're exposed to the elements.
Your traction is very limited, to the point of being a hindrance, in many situations.
Your payload is extremely limited.
Crashes seem to be inevitable, rather than an exception to the norm. I'm not saying all of them will be catastrophic, but every rider I've talked to has mentioned having at least a few crashes under his/her belt.

I get the appeal of riding a bike for weekend cruises. But for traveling into new, and potentially remote, areas, I just don't understand the appeal of a motorbike.
In a vehicle you watch the movie, on a bike you are the movie... (or something like that) :D


Don't get the same feeling driving a vehicle than I do riding a bike....my hands will start to shake and heart race just thinking about the next ride. As the things that you mentioned, it is the challenge of it all that is the appeal. It is one of the few things that will beat me down into to a bloody pulp, and I will come back for more with a smile on my face. People hike the Appalachian or Pacific Crest trail with much less payload...kind of the same thing but with wheels and a engine. I am trying to find the time to do Ridaho hopefully this year. Though I am supposed to go over to the West side of Oregon in September to ride with some friends, which happens to be about the best time to do the Ridaho trek. So it might get pushed off until next year. (again) That is probably the biggest challenge of them all...finding the time to actually get out there and do some long trips.

I don't understand why people go on cruises, but millions do annually....millions every year! That is crazy! Simply don't see the appeal.

Life long bucket list goal for me is to ride a bike around the world. Right now I am pretty content exploring Idaho, the surrounding states, and the PNW. But there will be a day I am going to sell everything off and hit the road indefinitely. Hopefully my body isn't too broken by then.
 
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#52
I’ve had much greater experiences with people on a motorcycle than vehicles. Yes, you are in the elements and have limitations on what you can bring. It made me rely upon talking to the local people more than sequestering myself in my truck. It also made me slow down and experience more.

I think many locals also understand your vulnerability on a bike. Not that they will drive differently and spare you an accident but if you make it to their town in one piece, they tend to help out with what you need more.


Smoke signals still work...
This^^. We have ridden two up in all kinds of places and countries, US, Peru, Bolivia, Mexico etc. While on the bike people are much more willing to help. The police in Peru radioed ahead to several stations on our route to make sure we checked in and were okay. Some local ranchers in Mexico had us in for Sunday lunch and gave us a place to sleep, etc etc. This type of hospitality is much less prevalent when we’re in the truck, or so it seems. The other added bonus is access is greatly improved when on a bike.


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#53
The last time we were down in Mexico, we were just sitting along side of the road taking a break eating some lunch. Some rancher out of nowhere pulls up in a beat up old Toyota pickup...jumped out, grabbed a gas jug out of the back of the bed and asked if we needed fuel. We said no we are good...but he kept on insisting we take some fuel...so we took some took some even though we didn't need any...he was thrilled! Grinning ear to ear!

The hospitality of people while you're on a bike is amazing, at least in foreign countries. Roll into town people are waving, giving you the thumbs up...well at least there. Here not so much...
 
#54
The last time we were down in Mexico, we were just sitting along side of the road taking a break eating some lunch. Some rancher out of nowhere pulls up in a beat up old Toyota pickup...jumped out, grabbed a gas jug out of the back of the bed and asked if we needed fuel. We said no we are good...but he kept on insisting we take some fuel...so we took some took some even though we didn't need any...he was thrilled! Grinning ear to ear!

The hospitality of people while you're on a bike is amazing, at least in foreign countries. Roll into town people are waving, giving you the thumbs up...well at least there. Here not so much...
Yep, that says it.
But we all like to do different experiences in different ways.
I am with the guy who wonders about cruise trips, or ballet, or Mexican resorts. Just me.
My wife hates to leave town, so I am by myself most of the time. The challenge is how spare can I go.
Nick Sanders like. Ride, eat, ride, sleep, ride and repeat.
 
#55
Yep, that says it.
But we all like to do different experiences in different ways.
I am with the guy who wonders about cruise trips, or ballet, or Mexican resorts. Just me.
My wife hates to leave town, so I am by myself most of the time. The challenge is how spare can I go.
Nick Sanders like. Ride, eat, ride, sleep, ride and repeat.
Yep!

Yeah...I don't get the whole floating hotels, resorts, whatever.....but awfully damn glad that millions do. Leaves more wide open back country for me. :D

People will say "But isn't that hard!?"

Yes! that is why I do it!;)

My wife is pretty adventurous, she rides dirt bikes, nothing too-too serious. She traveled a bunch when she was younger, and likes to be a homebody now...even though she is going to Thailand this summer for a couple weeks to help film a documentary on Burmese refugees living on the Thai/Myanmar border. She is funny..said after this one she is done traveling for awhile!

 
#56
Yep!

Yeah...I don't get the whole floating hotels, resorts, whatever.....but awfully damn glad that millions do. Leaves more wide open back country for me. :D

People will say "But isn't that hard!?"

Yes! that is why I do it!;)

There has got to be more to it than that. I understand the appeal of challenge and risk, to some degree. But doing a 9 hour bike ride through rain and mud in the middle of the nowhere Ontario doesn't sound fun to me. I like the adventure aspect of traveling, but I also like there to be just a little bit of comfort/safety factor with my vehicle so that I don't feel totally worn out.

I can't judge the skill or competency of those here who do ride religiously, but every video I've seen of some overland/offroad oriented bikers shows at least one wipeout or fall....I just wouldn't want to deal with that when traveling in a remote area.
 
#57
There has got to be more to it than that. I understand the appeal of challenge and risk, to some degree. But doing a 9 hour bike ride through rain and mud in the middle of the nowhere Ontario doesn't sound fun to me. I like the adventure aspect of traveling, but I also like there to be just a little bit of comfort/safety factor with my vehicle so that I don't feel totally worn out.

I can't judge the skill or competency of those here who do ride religiously, but every video I've seen of some overland/offroad oriented bikers shows at least one wipeout or fall....I just wouldn't want to deal with that when traveling in a remote area.
There is no such thing as bad weather, only inappropriate clothing. ;):D

I have done those 9 hour plus rides in the rain in mud in the middle of nowhere...dunno I thrive on miserable conditions...the beer and the tacos never taste so good at the end of the day. Now granted I don't want every single day like that...but every once and a while think it is needed to beaten down into a bloody pulp to see what your made of. Have had plenty of "Death Marches" over the years where you go into survival mode...you will amaze yourself that you can keep on going when your body has given up...it is that whole mind over matter thing. My ex-wife is a Tri-Athelete and ultra marathoner. She has done the Western States 100 and the like...I have nothing on her. I can buckle down and churn out 1600 miles on dirt bike in 7 days...but man, that trail running ultra marathon crap is a whole other level.

Maybe I can sum it up with this. "There is an immense beauty right after the storm, but you have to weather the storm to see it"


Yes, you will wreck, everyone wrecks from beginners to the pros...sometimes when your pushing hard...other times do a stupid "spode flop" in front of everybody just sitting around. It is part of the whole game. I have tripped off my front porch on a nice 72º day wearing flip flops and damn near cracked my head open. I rather be taken out in the middle of nowhere on some ride, than found dead on the third step of my porch.

Now I like my comfort too as I keep on looking at Class C RV's with a big ol' cushy bed and all the fixens...damn near an apartment on wheels. But I also like going out and testing myself too. Have done Iron Butt rides (1000 miles within 24hrs) when I was into street bikes.

My best friend as ridden his bicycle across the country from Seattle to Boston and I think he is nuts...so it is all relative. Though as I am getting older...starting to get the itch to do something like that...or hike the Appalachian Trail. But that is a big time commitment...don't have 3 months where I can take off...heck I can barely link 2 weeks together off. Sucks being self employed at times. My boss can be a dick! ;):D


If you try to schedule the trips around good weather times of the year, most of the time it is pretty easy...and occasionally have a bad weather/mechanical day. My wife is going to be in Thailand for 3 weeks during summer monsoon season, in a small village sleeping on mats... she even bought water proof notepads to write on because conditions are going to be dismal. Yeah no thanks!

Most of the longer trips I have been on, are just basically cruising along for the most part. Find with bikes it is easier than in the truck as you can put them just about anywhere since it is so small. Can get very limiting where you can put a 4 wheeled vehicle. That little foot path to to the beach...sure no problem! Corrugated dirt roads you don't even feel them, pot hole ridden slab...you can weave through them. Sure you give up some comfort, but the off-road (and well on-road) capability goes way up. A vehicle can't even begin to dream where you can put a bike.
 
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#58
Yes, I have quit riding for good. I have sold my Suzuki DR 650. Why, you may ask ? Two words.........Cell Phones.

I lived only 16 miles from where I worked. My current truck (2008 Dodge Power Wagon) gets 8-10 mpg---period. Last truck (2004 Dodge Ram 2500 QC 4x4) got 10 mpg. 2000 Dodge Dakota got 12 mpg. That's why I bought the bike, to save $$$$ & keep the mileage down on my trucks. I live in the country. Backroads all the way to work. Yet, without fail, I almost got killed 3x per week, by people on cell phones. It was unreal. Trucks, tractors, cars, combines, Police cars. I almost got run over by a Sheriff that was doing everything wrong that you could possibly do in a patrol car !!! His right hand was typing on the computer, his cell phone was between his right ear & right shoulder & his radio mic was in his left hand. He rolled through a stop sign & halfway into my lane. I hit the brakes & skidded to a stop but had to lift my right foot off the peg or it would have been crushed. No lights on, No sorry, no nothing. Cell phones are worse than crack & meth---everyone seems to be addicted to them. I think people are more likely to use them on back country roads as most Police are on the main roads, IDK ? But I am done with motorcycles. I am retired now but had 3 friends killed on motorcycles, while I was working.

And yes, it is illegal to use any handheld devise here in NY, while driving but it seems nobody cares.

People are awesome !!!
 
#59
I have been on and off bikes since I was 12, I'm 44 now. For the most part of my life I have had a bike in the garage and for a few years in my mid 20's I didn't own anything but an old Harley Sportster that was my daily driver year round when I lived in Ft. Collins Colorado. I rode in all conditions, including snow. Granted; it was only 3 or 4 miles to work every day, and I took all back roads in these conditions.
I have been primarily a street rider through all that time. I have lived in a rural mountain town in Colorado for the last 20 years. Over the years I came to love the speed, the distance I could travel, and the things I could see on a motorcycle in a day. Most of my riding was solo, but my wife also loved the bike. For our honeymoon, we spent a week sport touring the mountain passes of Colorado.
With that said, I sold my bike 2 years ago. I miss it, but.....
Downsizing was the reason I sold out. I have a small one car garage and moving the bike in and out of the garage when I wanted to work on my vehicles; and leaving it sit outside in a snowstorm for a few days at time, made me prioritize. I was spending more time building my truck and needed the garage space. I was also spending more time using the truck in my free time as I enjoy taking my dog with us on adventures.
A motorized vehicle is definitely the core for my adventures. I now have a built Toyota pickup for most adventures and a '77 Toyota Landcruiser for the slower adventures. Both provide me my fix, although a lot slower fix. The beauty is that they both still provide me with smiles per mile. That to me is the important part.
I still shop for a bike on a weekly basis, but I am happy with the compromises I have in my driveway at this point. I will own another bike in the future, but at this point in my life, I am happy with my compromises as I am a dog lover thoroughly enjoy the sacrifice to be able to have my dog along on my adventures.
 

Stumpalump

Expedition Leader
#60
I'm 55 on Saturday and just sold most of my herd. a Montesa 315r trials bike, KTM 200, XR400 and a KTM Adventure 950. I'm keeping the Rokon because it's bad azz. I got out of it because the dirtbikes means injuries that you cannot recover from at age. The adventure bike was a waste. All of them suck. The BMW is a freaking 500 pound computer controlled battle ship that is worthless off road. The KTM needed endless mandatory mods before it performed and was reliable but the biggest problem was the gearing. You either geared it so it had a usable and safe first and second gear for dirt or you geared it for a freeway drive. The dang thing idled at like 18 mph in first with stock hiway gears. When I was on it and had the right gears for conditions it was literally a highlight of my life. Amazing how fast and smooth that thing would handle fire roads. Big huge plastic POS that ran like a bat out of hell. If sombody made a 600-750 twin with a real first and a hiway top end that was not made like a BMW or KTM happy meal toy then maybe. They are so far off that's not even a maybe for now. I found way better ways to feed my need for speed and adventure than an adventure bike anyway.
 
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