ARB Air Compressor plug melted

dstock

Explorer
I had to remove my ARB compressor in my Jeep JK so the dealer can access the brake booster and when I went to unplug it, I found this:



This side of the connector is fairly melted however the other side is not. I don't see any other issues with the wiring loom and everything works as it should. I need to replace this connector but searches for T-connector aren't finding it. I may just replace both sides with a different connector, any suggestions?
 

dstock

Explorer
Those connectors are a common ‘shape’ but vary widely in dimension and ampacity.
One easy solution is replace both ends with an Anderson connector.
That's the direction I am leaning as the ARB has a 30 amp fuse, and I've got a handful of 45 amp Anderson connectors.
 

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Rando

Explorer
Thats a bummer!

Seeing you already have them, the Andersons are probably fine.

However, it is a bit disappointing that these have become the 'standard' as they are not really the best connector for this or most automotive applications (which is why you would never see an OEM use them). They have no environmental protection, no strain relief for the wires, no latch to keep them engaged and are weakly polarized. Metri pack (280 or 630) connectors would be a better option as they add all these features and a fairly DIY friendly.
 

dstock

Explorer
Thats a bummer!

Seeing you already have them, the Andersons are probably fine.

However, it is a bit disappointing that these have become the 'standard' as they are not really the best connector for this or most automotive applications (which is why you would never see an OEM use them). They have no environmental protection, no strain relief for the wires, no latch to keep them engaged and are weakly polarized. Metri pack (280 or 630) connectors would be a better option as they add all these features and a fairly DIY friendly.
Those Metri pack connectors are very nice. The Andersons don't have any strain relief for the wires and don't latch, so I am tempted to go this route instead. Thanks for the input!
 

dstock

Explorer
Those Metri pack connectors are very nice. The Andersons don't have any strain relief for the wires and don't latch, so I am tempted to go this route instead. Thanks for the input!
Correcting my previous post, Anderson does make a retention clip for their connectors so I will probably go this route, since I have the connectors, crimping tool, insertion/removal tool as well. Strain relief in this particular case is not an issue.

Here is the retention clip:

Anderson Retention Clip
 

Rando

Explorer
The Anderson connectors are fine for this application, and I would use them for this application if I had them on hand.

The issue was more a general comment on how it has disappointing that Anderson's are so widely used in the 12V DIY community as objectively speaking they are really not very good connectors.
 

dstock

Explorer
The Anderson connectors are fine for this application, and I would use them for this application if I had them on hand.

The issue was more a general comment on how it has disappointing that Anderson's are so widely used in the 12V DIY community as objectively speaking they are really not very good connectors.
Got it, thanks. Honestly in this situation I could just use a couple Posi-lock connectors as it's not like this gets unplugged often, in fact, it's the first time since it was installed 5 years ago!
 

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teotwaki

Excelsior!
My ARB compressor's white plastic connector also melted. I believe the prongs became corroded, raising the resistance and increasing the voltage drop as well as generating heat.

I went with the Anderson 45A connector a while back and have had no problems.

 
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