Auxiliary Gasoline Storage

#1
Hey all!

Looking for inspiration on how you guys carry spare gas, whether in cheapo plastic jerrycans, Rotopax, larger capacity replacement tanks, or even not carrying spare gas and the reasons why.

I've been using a cheapo 5gal jerrycan for a while and it has done the job, but I'd like to have the ability to carry more fuel to expand my range. I'm planning on getting either 1 or two of these (http://titanfueltanks.com/products/sidekick-tank) and while I'm not too concerned about using them under a canopy, I'm open to your guys' thoughts on that!
 
#2
I have a couple Scepter MFCs. I keep one in my Jeep when I think I might need extra fuel. I have kept Scepter MFC cans in my Jeep or Hummer (while in the Army) since the 90s and never had an issue.
 
#3
Those Titan storage tanks would work great in a PU bed but many have enclosed vehicles and there is no place to put that type of equipment.
I have been using the Nato jerry cans for about 30 years. They are strong, don't leak and allow a 20 liter (5 gal) capacity. Now I usually only carry two on the vehicle for extended trips, usually I am within range of a station but I do keep an eye on the fuel gage.
Tried the Jeep cans but they leak and the Nato cans don't.
 

rayra

Expedition Leader
#4
That sidewall tank is a neat idea but at a ridiculous price for the volume stored. $450 for what could be done with (3) scepter 'civilian' 20L jugs for $60. And the jugs are portable, can be carried in an emergency, while the fixed tank wouldn't.
 

pluton

Adventurer
#6
I've had the cheapo pre-CARB plastic cans, the cheapo CARB ones with the ghastly spouts, the heavier ones they sell at dirtbike shops, the Scepters and the current euro-Jerrycans. The euro jerrycans are the least leaky of vapor during storage. I carry them on the roof rack, so I can't say if they stink up the car interior during transport.
 
#7
I have had the Nato cans on the roof rack, in the desert and they will expand as the fuel warms and will need to be opened carefully (pointed away from you) as the liquid has expanded, they do not release vapor on their own.
That being said they still don't leak even under pressure. I carry them on their sides up there. If the gasket starts to take on a groove over time just take it out and turn it over to get the flatness back. Purchasing new gaskets every few years is good insurance anyway.
 
#8
I have had the Nato cans on the roof rack, in the desert and they will expand as the fuel warms and will need to be opened carefully (pointed away from you) as the liquid has expanded, they do not release vapor on their own.
Thanks! Can you point me to exactly what cans you are referring to?
 

rayra

Expedition Leader
#10
Do these vent fumes and can they be stored on their side?
No and Yes. They're about 2/3 as thick as a milspec scepter jug, are unvented and have a very sturdy ratcheting cap which traps the funnel internally. Which by the way - like everything CARB - spills gas all over when you lift the nozzle up out of the jug.
 
#11
#12
I use Rotopax. I have a 32 gallon fuel tank and carry three 3 gallon Rotopax on the rear swingout. For more remote, I also have an additional two 2 gallon Rotopax and a mount on the side of my RTT rack. Learned a lesson 30 years ago in Death Valley - if you hit a rock and crack your fuel tank, you'd better have: 1) The ability to repair it at least to the point it will hold fuel; and 2) Enough on board fuel to get back to civilization.
IMG_1430.jpg
 
#13
Details?

I have a lot of space under the drivers side of the cab and under the bed where I could put something. But I haven't found any tanks made for this purpose. The marine fuel tanks come in lots of sizes, but I don't know how to plumb them into my existing tank, or if it's possible. https://www.wholesalemarine.com/moeller-18-gallon-below-deck-permanent-marine-fuel-tank.html
My install thread HERE will give you some ideas on plumbing and electrical.

Marine tanks would be a good route with all the size options. Dont over think it and keep it simple IMO. I have come close to paying for the tank with the gas savings not being forced to pay the high prices when traveling. The bonus never worry about running out of gas again.
 
#14
My install thread HERE will give you some ideas on plumbing and electrical.

Marine tanks would be a good route with all the size options. Dont over think it and keep it simple IMO. I have come close to paying for the tank with the gas savings not being forced to pay the high prices when traveling. The bonus never worry about running out of gas again.
I have the space underneath and seriously considering this option to move the weight lower and further forward.
 
#15
My install thread HERE will give you some ideas on plumbing and electrical.
Thanks for the writeup, but with my zero knowledge of fuel systems, I don't understand what you did. It looks like you have an electric pump that dumps fuel from the aux tank to the main via a switch. The filler is a fancy contraption and I don't know why it was needed. Convenience for filling both at once?
 
Top