Best DIY bedliner?

Funrover

Expedition Leader
I am curious what has worked well for others. I have tried Herculiner, not sure it's that impressive. Buddy used durabak, seems to do well. Always love to see/hear what others on here have used and how it worked out. Thanks
 

SGNellett

Adventurer
I have used Durabak on my trailer and the floors of my TJ. I was a bit rushed doing the floors and they didn't turn out well, or hold up as well as I'd have liked. The trailer, on the other hand, still looks great. I used multiple colors and textures and have been pretty happy with all of it that I applied properly.
 

malibubts

Adventurer
I just did the roll on Raptor and am pretty happy with it. I don't have any pictures yet and obviously no long term report, but I do like the texture and it seems pretty tough. From looking around before I did my coating project the muti-part mixture kits seemed to have the best reviews.

Are you going to roll or air gun? I just covered a plywood dog platform, but if I was doing anything more serious I would have shot it with an air gun. The roll on kit wasn't bad, but the results look a little better and it honestly looks easier than rolling. I also pushed the included roller a little to hard and didn't notice some pieces falling off and getting stuck to the coating until it was hardened.
 

Funrover

Expedition Leader
It will be roll on for me. I am going to do the interior flooring and what not on my rover and then build a sleep platform over that
 

steelhd

Observer
I am curious what has worked well for others. I have tried Herculiner, not sure it's that impressive. Buddy used durabak, seems to do well. Always love to see/hear what others on here have used and how it worked out. Thanks
Durabak and Herculiner are the exact same product. Many years ago when I was doing a boat the Durabak was mostly sold to the industrial/commercial market and Herculiner was sold mostly to the consumer market. Main difference at the time was Durabak was available in gallons and came in more colors. And black wasn't UV stable without a topcoat (maybe still the case?) so I spent a few more dollars and used grey. Worked great and is still holding up.
 
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stevet47

Member
I have not used it myself, but I have done a ton of research and Monstaliner is what I will be going with next time I need bedliner.
 

Hnoroian

Observer
All major brands work well. The key to do them well is prep, prep some more, prep again and do multiple light coats. I'd go the extra quart or two on heavy use areas.
 

steelhd

Observer
All major brands work well. The key to do them well is prep, prep some more, prep again and do multiple light coats. I'd go the extra quart or two on heavy use areas.
This. ^ No matter what the coating is, 80% of a good job is proper prep and the other 20% is application. 100% to the manufacturers instructions. The problem with most consumer products is the instructors are poor to nonexistant. If I can't find a real technical data sheet, and the manufacturer can't/won't provide one on request, I use something else.
 

Martinjmpr

Wiffleball Batter
Feed the Monsta.
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Sent from my SM-T230NU using Tapatalk
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Will have to look into http://www.monstaliner.com/ more!!
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4 years ago my wife and I rebuilt our homemade wooden teardrop trailer (there's a writeup on it here on ExPo but I'm too lazy to dig it up - use the keyword "bubbles" and you should be able to find it. ;) )
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Our biggest issue was that the thin plywood on the roof was breaking down in the vicious Colorado sun and we were really worried that it would fail. We considered covering it with aluminum but the cost would have been prohibitive. Sealing with CPES would have been an option but that was way beyond my skill set.
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What we ultimately decided on was Monstaliner. I called the company and told them what I was trying to do and they recommended that we put a coat of their "chassis saver" aluminized coating on first to seal and harden the surface, and then put the Monstaliner over that. We actually used two different colors because we wanted to replicate the "teardrop" shape that the builder had put on top of the trailer, and the result was spectacular.
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Once thing to consider about Monstaliner is that we rolled it on with the rollers that are included in the kit and the surface was pretty smooth to the touch - not the spiky, friction-y surface that you get with some bed liners. Some people like the friction on a bed liner as it will help hold things in place, but we didn't want it on the outside of our trailer.
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We kept that trailer for 2 more years and multiple camping trips, everywhere from the Front Range of the Rockies up to Glacier National Park, out to Yosemite and the Grand Canyon, through Death Valley and out to Texas and Oklahoma and the Monstaliner proved to be as tough as nails - no chips, no cracks and the finish looked as good on the day we sold the trailer as it did when we put it on two years before.
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So even though it was a different sort of application than the one you're talking about, I think I can safely recommend Monstaliner. It's not cheap, but you get what you pay for.
 

Zeiderman

Adventurer
The owner is on JF probably ever day with thousands of pages. One thing I would suggest is buy multiple roller covers, and use 1 per application. The finish is tough as nails and you can make it as smooth or rough as you want, spray or roll your choice. Be sure to follow prep to a "T", that will be your only down fall, but same as paint or otherwise, prep is key.

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Buliwyf

Viking with a Hammer
Monstaliner.

But only if applied in the SUMMER! You have to scuff your paint, and then degrease. Not much to it.
 
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