Brake issues

pugslyyy

Robinson Fuso
#47
Bit of a follow up on this. As I said in the previous post, I rang around a bunch of brake places in Perth to ask about it, inc getting different compound shoes, and was told by all that there's no such thing.
Leading me to think that a custom disc conv was going to be the way out.
My mechanic friend spoke to his brake supplier, and was apparently told that they sell a shoe compound for the jap trucks with crap brakes, that is allegedly a fair bit more 'bitey'..
So I have a set of these to try out, hoping to get them fitted this
wkend.
Fingers crossed.
Did you ever get these fitted? Any improvement?
 
#48
Unfortunately they're still sitting in my car,awaiting a good time to do them. For the last couple months every single weekend has been pouring rain here, and I don't have an undercover area to work on it.. ugh. Should be clearing from now so hopefully soon.
 
#51
has any one had issues with the nps isuzu doing the same?
I have the 2010 NPS with 19.5 wheels, 285/70 tyres and camper body. I've locked the rear tyres when a little Chinese lady stopped unexpectedly in a little Chinese car and I rearranged her boot bit a little. I've locked the rears on a wet Austrian road and gave my passenger (and me) a good fright as the back end started to come round to the front but never locked all 4 on sealed road - I think they would.

The braking effect is definetely less in reverse but I haven't stalled it yet on a good steep hill to see if we have the same issue but I suspect yes. The Isuzu did have larger front drums then the FG84 at the time IIRC and my wheels/tyres aren't as large so some benefit there.
 
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#52
Ok, finally got round to doing all the brakes on mine, and replacing the shoes with the alleged upgraded ones. Which I might add, if you've not done them before, is quite a job. The drums both front and rear are behind the hubs so everything outward of the hub has to come off... inc the freewheel hubs at the front. And don't forget to first remove the circlip on the end of the axle shaft inside the freewheel hub like I did.. haha yea.....

I did do a couple timed stops beforehand, so I would have a decent before and after. Ended up doing it from 70-72 (whatever 60 on the dash is, I'll try gps it soon) to 0. Average of 3 stops is 7.2s. Yes I'm aware how atrocious that is. Also interesting was that after a couple stops then arriving back at home, the front drums are way too hot to touch, probably 100+ deg, while the rears are just slightly warm- maybe 20-30deg.

After doing just the fronts the stop time came down to 5.9. My mechanic buddy says they'll probably take a few good stops to 'bed in' to the drums, but we'll see.

After doing the rears the time came down to 5.3, but the pedal was going basically to the floor on first pump, I have a feeling that I didn't adjust the rear shoes out enough and possibly it's now taking 2 pumps to push them all the way out. Seems unlikely that it would all of a sudden need bleeding when it was fine 4 days ago, but then stranger things have happened. Hopefully I'll get to that today. Again, front drums hot hot, rears barely warm.
I'll try get rid of the proportioning valve and see how it goes then. Maybe a manual bias valve might be the go.
 
#53
Brakes

Ok, finally got round to doing all the brakes on mine, and replacing the shoes with the alleged upgraded ones. Which I might add, if you've not done them before, is quite a job. The drums both front and rear are behind the hubs so everything outward of the hub has to come off... inc the freewheel hubs at the front. And don't forget to first remove the circlip on the end of the axle shaft inside the freewheel hub like I did.. haha yea.....

I did do a couple timed stops beforehand, so I would have a decent before and after. Ended up doing it from 70-72 (whatever 60 on the dash is, I'll try gps it soon) to 0. Average of 3 stops is 7.2s. Yes I'm aware how atrocious that is. Also interesting was that after a couple stops then arriving back at home, the front drums are way too hot to touch, probably 100+ deg, while the rears are just slightly warm- maybe 20-30deg.

After doing just the fronts the stop time came down to 5.9. My mechanic buddy says they'll probably take a few good stops to 'bed in' to the drums, but we'll see.

After doing the rears the time came down to 5.3, but the pedal was going basically to the floor on first pump, I have a feeling that I didn't adjust the rear shoes out enough and possibly it's now taking 2 pumps to push them all the way out. Seems unlikely that it would all of a sudden need bleeding when it was fine 4 days ago, but then stranger things have happened. Hopefully I'll get to that today. Again, front drums hot hot, rears barely warm.
I'll try get rid of the proportioning valve and see how it goes then. Maybe a manual bias valve might be the go.
A bit late now, but it is best not to work the brakes too hard for a few hundred kilometers so they can break in. Otherwise you end up glazing the shoes and they will never work right. I would be very interested in a product description of the new shoes as I am in need of some.

Thanks!

Allan
 
#54
so the 2wd comes with disc but the 4wd comes with drum... has anyone looked into swapping the 2wd disc's over? or is not worth the effort? seems like an axle swap (with discs) would almost be a requirement if it's common place for them to not hold the vehicle on a hill, especially from rolling backwards.

sorry, I don't have a canter, and probably won't for a few years, but I'm in the research phase of building myself a truly go anywhere self contained multi country vehicle.
 
#55
Back to the top with some new information that was handed to me by a worker at a business that I inquired about changing linings :- which they don't recommend. It seems that because they don't know the hardness of the original linings they won't supply anything different than standard. And these were experts in the linings game that supply to rally crews and for race cars.
He said the work solved the brake problem that we are all having as he was the one that did the actual work.

Anyway I removed identifiable info from the receipt but this was done for one of OUR developers in Canters in Australia and is not advertised as available. Probably as second tier of manufacture. It was on a new 2015 Canter.

img049b.jpg

The breakdown of this is they modify the proportioning valve (he didn't know what as he didn't do the mod), rebore the rear cylinders from 1 1/8" to 1 3/16" and then fit residual line pressure valves.

Also after speaking to a gent that drives a 2WD Canter which has at least discs on the front and also has driven a 4WD to him the brakes are no better.

Dan.
 
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#56
Dan, I don't have the details on the shoes I used as I'm a retard and threw out all the packaging...
I got them through a mechanic friend, I'll ask him to find out what they are. I actually need some for the handbrake as that seems to be stuffed ever since I overheated it rolling backwards down a hill..
The grippier linings are definitely a worthwhile upgrade, mine would have to be near 80% better than it was before.
Now that you mention the proportioning valve, I forgot to say earlier, the other thing I did which on its own probably had the biggest single impact on reverse braking was disconnect the actuating rod off the diff, and tie the end up as hard ans high as possible, simulating a loaded truck. Made a big difference, brakes actually have some grab in reverse now..
I am still looking into going discs though.
 
#57
was disconnect the actuating rod off the diff, and tie the end up as hard ans high as possible, simulating a loaded truck. Made a big difference, brakes actually have some grab in reverse now..
That's great to know... My ball joint broke of and I just ties up the arm to keep it out of the way!
 
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