cabin passage??

petervandiemen

New member
how do you call a (flexible) passage from cab to the living area (in english), i'm planning to make one in my daf yal 4440 but i'm not shore what materials/ techniques to use or maybe they are avaible in standard sizes.
any advices or links??
thx in advance!
Peter
 

mhiscox

Expedition Leader
I can pass on an alternate method from an earlier post of mine:

My Unimog camper, Camper Mog (built in the Netherlands in 1995), is done differently from many. Lots of campers use a flexible bellows between cab and cabin, but sometimes it's hard to keep the bellows in place and, besides, with the big passthrough on Camper Mog (about 5 feet tall by 2+ feet wide), the bellows would be really big and expensive. Instead, the rear of the cab and the front of the cabin each have a flange around the passthrough that extends about six inches, but the flange on the cab is a little smaller in height and width than the one on the cabin (or it could be vice-versa; can't remember for sure and it's not here to check).

The smaller flange fits inside the bigger flange with enough clearance that the two can twist independently, but the gap is small enough that water can't leak in. (And there's a bit of weatherstripping involved, too.) This seems a clever approach and it's proven a trouble-free way to do it
 

Victorian

Approved Vendor : Total Composites
I can pass on an alternate method from an earlier post of mine:

My Unimog camper, Camper Mog (built in the Netherlands in 1995), is done differently from many. Lots of campers use a flexible bellows between cab and cabin, but sometimes it's hard to keep the bellows in place and, besides, with the big passthrough on Camper Mog (about 5 feet tall by 2+ feet wide), the bellows would be really big and expensive. Instead, the rear of the cab and the front of the cabin each have a flange around the passthrough that extends about six inches, but the flange on the cab is a little smaller in height and width than the one on the cabin (or it could be vice-versa; can't remember for sure and it's not here to check).

The smaller flange fits inside the bigger flange with enough clearance that the two can twist independently, but the gap is small enough that water can't leak in. (And there's a bit of weatherstripping involved, too.) This seems a clever approach and it's proven a trouble-free way to do it


Do you have a pic of that?
 

mhiscox

Expedition Leader
Do you have a pic of that?
Ummm, no. And Camper Mog is not here to take one. The best I can do now is this picture that gives you a little idea of the gap between cabin and cab, so you can estimate the depth of the flanges. Sorry.

 

petervandiemen

New member
Still not quit finding what i'm looking for, i like to have some serious quality and insulation, i don't wanna invent what's already even better invented, anymore advices, pls pls,

thx, Peter,

"this excludes my judgement about the Unimog Mike (can't judge what i can't see) i'm from the Netherlands where's the Mog??"
 
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