Desert Trip VI: Another Mojave Rd, Death Valley and some Utah Canyonlands

Larry

Bigassgas Explorer
#1
This is not the typical Mohave Rd and Death Valley trip report. This one is different, as it involves an old truck, rubber duck and two Dodge Rams. No high dollar Jeeps, Land Rovers, Land Cruisers, roof top tents or Backcountry adventuring for photography skill advertising and product promotion. Just a few friends getting together to escape the daily grind.

Day 1: Saturday, March 23nd – Getting there
Goal: Pueblo, CO to Kingman, AZ - 827 Miles

Originally we planned to roll out of Pueblo around 5:30 AM to meet my friend, ColoradoBill, on the Southside of town. With his cancellation we decided to leave a bit later. We also knew there was a winter storm brewing but Pueblo County on South to the New Mexico border was supposed to be spared until later in the day on that Saturday. Uh! WRONG! As it turned out it started snowing at my house around 5 AM. It wasn’t a major snow, just enough to make the roads slicker than hell plus the wind made it an almost complete whiteout at times. From home to the New Mexico side of Raton Pass we were only able to roll at 35 to 40 MPH most of the time. Once headed down the New Mexico side of Raton Pass the roads were dry, the sun was out, warmth filled the cab with sunshine blasting through the windows, birds were chirping, etc. Life was good so we thought.

Well that good travel weather only lasted for about 40 miles until we hit Springer, NM. For the next 325 miles From Springer all the way to Gallup, NM was like driving in hurricane force winds. The few Semi’s that were actually on the road were driving way below speed limit with their hazards on, many semi’s and high profile vehicles were pulled off on the side of the road. There was so much dust and dirt in the air visibility was just as bad as the whiteout snow storm we had just left in Colorado. Incidentally we heard they closed I-25 South near Trinidad after we passed through. Lucky for us!

From Gallup to Flagstaff the wind subsided enough to bring the speed up into the 80-87 MPH range until just outside of Flagstaff where I-40 turns into a total piece of crap. I-40 from there onto CA is junk! If there is any reason at all AZ Gov. Jan Brewer should learn to get along with the feds, it would be for the sake of getting their Interstates fixed.

We were losing daylight fast so I wanted to hit up a car wash in Flagstaff to clean off the road deicer crap we got in CO before we got into Kingman plus I thought the road deicer was wreaking havoc on the dual tank switch valve. Ah, man….I played hell finding a coin car wash in Flag. I finally found the world’s worst car wash next to a Sonic someplace in Flag. This poor excuse of a car wash didn’t even have a bill exchanger so I had to go to Sonic to get change. Of course, the kids at Sonic said their manager won’t allow them to give change because people come over there from the car wash all the time for change. I told him we were coming over for dinner once I was done, and basically begged for quarters like some crack whore. He gave in and hesitantly exchanged a few dollars for me. Then the car wash itself sucked. I could pee harder than the water pressure then the scrub brush broke as I was using it. What a joke! At least I got the deicer poop off. For those that may live in Flag probably now which exact car wash this is. After that time waster we made it into Kingman around 9ish and crashed at the Hampton Inn.

Trip Summary


100 miles of this caca was no way to start a vacation


First coffee return break near Trinidad, CO


Making good time between Gallup, NM and Flagstaff, AZ. The old pig actually flies down the interstate quite nicely.



Somewhere between Flagstaff and Kingman on I-40
 

Larry

Bigassgas Explorer
#2
Beginning of the Mojave Rd

Day 2: Sunday, March 24th – Mojave Rd
Goal: Enjoy the Mojave Rd for 2 nights and 3 days


I forgot to mention in the last post that as we approached Kingman I received a text from member Mighty Dodge Ram driving up from Camarillo, CA to meet us the next day in Bullhead City. His text said he wasn’t feeling well and wouldn’t be able to make for the Mojave Rd portion of the trip but hoped to meet us in Baker, CA on the way to Death Valley a few days later. With that, only 2 of the original 6 vehicles that confirmed to make this weeklong journey only made it.

After checking out of the hotel in Kingman we rolled into Bullhead City where we met up with my high school buddy, Ty from San Diego, and his brother in a 2005 Cummins powered Dodge Ram in the Wal-Mart parking lot. Ty’s brother actually few into San Diego a few days earlier from New York City to play in the desert with us for the week. The Mojave and Death Valley are going to be quite the change for dude that has lived in New York City for the past 12 years! No Starbucks out here buddy! While we were grabbing last minute things at Wal-Mart I rewired the fuel gauge circuit from the switch valve to the connector near the starter. The old circuit had a sketchy looking spice that I suspected road deicer got into causing resistance issues resulting in the gauge problems.

In the end that turned out to be a waste of time to make this repair as I later discovered the 6.5L diesel lift pump that I was using as a fuel transfer pump was allowing fuel to move from the Aux RH tank to the Main LH tank all by itself. At the end of the day, I never had a fuel gauge problem at all….just fuel levels moving on their own. Now that I am home, I plan to ditch the center mount transfer pump all together and add a TBI tank, sending unit and pump on the RH side to use as a transfer pump. People are probably wondering why I use a transfer pump in the first place, but with the 8.1L the return line is too large (3/8) for the fuel tank switch valve (5/16) where the valve restricts the fuel as it returns though the valve causing the head pressure to run around 100 psi. Pollock doesn't make a switch valve for 3/8 return lines. Little LS engines with the small return line do not have that issue. The big block L18 is a different animal with a huge return line.

So now with us topped off with supplies and fuel we were at the Mojave Rd trailhead right at the Colorado River on the Ft. Mojave Indian reservation. This is where the original Mojave trail the Indians used hundreds of years ago to haul goods back and forth from the Colorado River to the Pacific Ocean. That is a long haul just to trade some corn for sea shells!

Bon voyage! The Colorado River marks the beginning of the Mojave Rd


This trips adventure mascot was looking pretty happy to finally be on the trail


About an hour to hour and a half the trail finally crosses from NV to CA. No California welcoming center out here. AZ, NV and CA are all very close together in this part of the desert.


I felt like a Mexican coyote smuggling the yellow rubber ducky into California through the back door.


Some neat old buildings scattered about.


Fort Piute 24 miles into the Mojave Rd


Neat Barrel Cactus along the way


See that road wayyy out there on the horizon. That is the road we’ve been following and will follow for the next couple days.


Fort Piute


The ruins of Fort Piute. The park service has done some rebuilding so it is not 100% original. The lady in the orange is my mother-in-law and copilot. Odd to bring a MIL but FIL and my wife are not into the outdoors stuff but she is. She is a good camp chef and spotter too. She never complained once all week. Quite the trooper!


Check out all of these barrel cactus. They were all concentrated in this one area.


Camp site 1 on the Mojave Rd. This night I felt a cold or something coming on as I could not get warm. More on that debacle later. At this point we are about 25 miles into the Mojave Rd with around 115 miles yet to go.




What kind of friend would place a rubber snake in a buddy’s tent? I WOULD! :sombrero:




Little Elvis was impressed with the campsite





This spot in the Mojave doesn’t look much different from where I live in Colorado


The Fort Piute ruins in the pictures above are just on the other side of that hill
 
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Larry

Bigassgas Explorer
#3
Day 3: Monday, March 25th – Mojave Rd
Goad: Try not to die

Monday morning after packing up camp we took a side jaunt up to a nearby corral next to a little canyon. Pretty cool.




A bit down the trail we ran across our first Joshua Tree where we all took many pictures of it like a bunch of tourists that had never seen a Joshua Tree before. About an hour after this we were so deep in Joshua Trees scraping our trucks we were ready to start cutting them down.


Little Elvis joined in on our initial Joshua Tree excitement


This sucker was huge!




GoPro view of the frame twister

Frame twister

Just cruising the Mojave

Then we came upon an old school bus and Ford station wagon laying out in the desert all shot to bits.






Little Elvis said that was a Ford engine with nothing worth taking with us for spare parts


Motivational proverb written on the fender of the School Bus.


Just past the bus was a tool can hanging from a tree. Toll fee is .01 per person. All we had was a Nickel so the next 3 peeps get in free.


MIL read in the Mojave Rd guide this was the only spot where this particular cactus grows in the Mojave Desert.


Descending big hill


Next up was a really cool multilevel spring. Well hidden too. We would have driven right past it if it hadn't been in the road guide.


Little Elvis was ecstatic to get out to swim a while


I can't remember the significance of this place as my health was quickly tanking.




After the above picture was taken I called my buddy on the squawk box and “Hey man, we need to find a place to camp soon…I think I am going to die”. Here it was about 78 degrees and was wearing two long sleeve t-shirts with a sweat shirt and a hoody over that while sitting on the sunny side of the truck and still freezing my butt off. My eyes burned like crazy and every bone and joint in my body ached. My joints hurt so bad I could barely step on the clutch anymore. After what seemed like forever to find a place to camp I had the top up, gas and water turned on and in my sack within 5 minutes. My MIL was getting very concerned about me and asking if she needed to use the 911 button on SPOT. I kept telling her to just let me sweat out whatever was bothering me and I would be fine. Within 2 hours I totally drenched all the clothes I was wearing as well as the sleeping bag. MIL snatched the A/C thermometer from the dash of the truck and poked it in my mouth. Not sure how accurate a Blue-Point Air Conditioning duct thermometer is on humans but it said I had over 100 degree temp. None the less, I slept like a baby for a few hours and woke up just as the sun was setting and felt a whole lot better even to the point I was able to eat some soup MIL made and downed some coffee. After dinner I crawled under my sack and went back to sleep. The next morning I woke up and felt 90% better. As it turned out MIL and my buddies were up studying the map to see where we could get off the Mojave Rd to find an ER to haul me too. Thankfully it did not come to that.

I know what most are thinking, I was dehydrated. Nada…This isn't my first rodeo to the desert and learned long ago the importance if staying hydrated. My urine was clear and plentiful which is not indicative of dehydration. Not sure what the issue was but I really haven't felt 100% since that day, which was over a week ago. In fact, I went to the Doctor yesterday (4-2-13) and got some antibiotics. The Dr. says I am coming off of a sinus and ear infection.

See, it pays to bring the wife's momma on these trips. She helped nurse me back to health. She even washed my drenched clothes by hand in the sink so they didn't stink up our house.

More later…..
 
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Larry

Bigassgas Explorer
#4
Day 4: Tuesday, March 26th – Mojave Rd
Goad: Complete Mojave Rd and peddle up to Death Valley

Woke up Tuesday morning feeling a whole lot better. Wouldn't want to run a marathon but I was good enough to continue on.

First stop was the mailbox




Interesting collection of frogs a few paces away from the mailbox. One frog even whistles at you as a shadow casts over him. We didn't have any frogs to donate…only a rubber duck and snake and they didn't want to stay with the frogs.




Approaching Soda Lake. The GoPro gives the false illusion one is traveling much faster than they really are.

Soda Lake


More Soda Lake





Exiting Soda Lake towards Razor Rd

As we were approaching the end of the Mojave Rd I was in communication with Expo member Mighty Dodge Ram where he was in the area and would met us at the Zzyzx exit which was only 1 exit North of where were coming out. Once we reached the gas station at Razor Rd and I-15 we aired up then started peddling North to Baker while Richard jumped behind us as we passed the Zzyzx exit.

The next stop was Baker, CA to restock on fuel, water and supplies. Finding water for the camper's water tank turned into a hassle driving from gas station to gas station until finding one with RV accommodations. $5 later and I had all the water I could ever want but unfortunately, I didn't have a hose long enough to get the water from the well-guarded water spicket into the camper so we had to improvise by stuffing a small piece of the water transfer pump hose into the washing machine water hose I keep in the camper. Mom was helpful in holding everything together then squiring me with the hose after it was full.



From Baker we pushed on for another 115 miles to Furnace Creek Visitor center in Death Valley while Little Elvis provided the route guidance


We rolled into Furnace Creek Visitor just in time to watch the Ranger lock the door in our face as approach the door. Ah, well….no DV tee-shirt for me this day. We ran around the corner to the general store to top off with fuel once more before headed out into the dirt so see what this Death Valley thing is all about. After a group review of the map we decided to head up the road to Echo Canyon to camp for the night.

We ended up finding a pretty decent camp spot in Echo Canyon with a great sunset view of DV.




We all took turns passing through the shower stall on my truck to rid ourselves of the days dust, ate a great meal and crashed.

Tomorrow is a new day…. More later
 
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#5
No high dollar Jeeps, Land Rovers, Land Cruisers, roof top tents or Backcountry adventuring for photography skill advertising and product promotion. Just a few friends getting together to escape the daily grind.
Amen.

Great report.

Todd Z.
 
#6
Fun Report

This is not the typical Mohave Rd and Death Valley trip report. This one is different, as it involves an old truck, rubber duck and two Dodge Rams. No high dollar Jeeps, Land Rovers, Land Cruisers, roof top tents or Backcountry adventuring for photography skill advertising and product promotion. Just a few friends getting together to escape the daily grind.

Double Amen to the above quote. Although I'm not sure that Larry's 78 can qualify as an old, worn out, beat up, oil burning, piece of rolling nostalgia.

Sorry that I missed the trip. Mo and I did the Mojave road by ourselves and it wasn't the greatest trip. The week before it snowed and the week we were there it was in the high 90's. The history was the part that made it all worthwhile.

Can't say that about Death Valley. I just fell in love with it and want to go back a bunch of times. Can't wait to hear your views.
Mikey
 
#8
Nice write up. Way to cheat death!!

Man, I'd pay money to see a pic of you in the sleeping bag with the Blue Point thermomter hanging off your lip. LOL!!
 

Larry

Bigassgas Explorer
#9
Day 5: Wednesday, March 27th – Death Valley
Goad: Check out Scotty’s Castle and find the Race Track Rd

So Wednesday morning we figured we’d follow Echo Canyon up a ways to see what it was all about. Richard in the Mighty Dodge Ram still wasn’t feeling well either and decided to hang back and catch up with us on our way back down the canyon.

Interesting rock wall right around the corner from where we camped the night before. I believe this was called Window Rock





GoPro ascending up Echo Canyon. Not much to see up there actually.

On the way back down Echo Canyon we picked up Richard and proceeded back into Furnace Creek to get our Park Pass (my MIL has a lifetime pass but the vending machines won’t recognize it). From there we made the 53 mile ride to Scotty’s Castle. The oddest thing happened to my truck as we got closer to Scotty’s Castle, the rear axle started overheating and loading the engine like the brakes was applied. With us being so close to Scotty’s Castle I just kept going. One we got there I poked my head underneath the truck to find a decent quantity of lube had purged out of the vent and smoking on the exhaust. We messed around the castle for about an hour or so then came back and the truck rolled fine until we were headed to Beatty, NV a few days later where it overheated again. From there Beatty it never acted up along the 1,300 mile journey back home. Weird.

-165 Ft. below sea level. I couldn’t get pulled over in time to get a picture of the -200 ft a few miles back


Scotty’s Castle




No shortage of tourists here


After leaving the castle we backtracked a few miles to the Race Track road. We missed our opportunity to air down before got on the actual Race Track Rd so we ended up airing down right in the middle of the road. Who knew the road would have such high berms where we wouldn’t be able to pull off to air down for like 1000 miles? I am sure we pissed off the few vehicles that passed while we aired down.


After airing down we followed the Race Track road for an annoying 25 miles to Tea Kettle Junction. Any car can make the drive to the Race Track. It is just an annoyingly bumpy road with lots of washboards but rich with scenery.





An hour or so further down the road we come across the famous Race Track where the rocks magically move when the dry lake bed is wet.

Pretty amazing view when the Race Track first starts coming into sight




MIL way out there












Racing Rocks




To be continued…..
 

Larry

Bigassgas Explorer
#10
Day 5 Continued……

At the end of the Race Track road begins the Lippincott 4x4 trail that runs down to Saline Valley. This trail turned out to be quite long where we ended up camping for the night about half way down. Lippincott isn't much of a technical trail but it is quite steep and narrow with plenty of opportunities for one's sphincter to pinch many of holes in the truck seat.

Mighty Dodge Ram on his way down early into the Lippincott trail


These are long GoPro videos to watch but if you have the time and patience you'll get a good idea of the steep grade and narrowness. Wear your head phones for the best audio. The truck stops a few times while I spot for Mighty Dodge Ram behind me.

Beginning the Lippincott descend

Second of the descend. Very long video (21 minutes). For the full affect wear earphones. To smell exhaust fumes add a second pair of earphones up your nose :sombrero:

Third of the descend. We stopped at the end of this video to camp for the night. Pucker factor pretty tight at 1:15

Our campsite about halfway down Lippincott. Everybody quickly made dinner, enjoyed a few beverages then on to bed for the night.


That is it for day 5 :coffeedrink:

More soon….
 
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#11
What Larry fails to mention is that I called for the spots after watching his left rear wheel run halfway over washouts at the crux on several tight corners...and he was running the shortest wheelbase of the three! I'm not bashful and he was gracious about it! While it's true that Lippincott is not particularly technical you are pretty much committed once you begin. With the exception of the turnout we camped in, I'm not sure where you would turn around. About halfway through I wondered why I would be taking my "once again" daily driver on this trail in the middle of Death/Saline Valley. As it turned out, no regrets...none.

Larry's doing a great job of reporting and I'll sit back and read along until I figure out how to post some of my pics. What a great group of fellow travelers to spend a couple of days with. I'm thankful for the invite. :sombrero:
 
#12
Larry, what a really cool and fun trip! It inspired me to either go on the next one (if invited of course) or take one soon enough with my little family in tow. I actually lived in Beatty, NV (who can say that) when I was young into my teenage years. I have seen most of DV from the back of my dad's touring bike when I was too young to drive. Seeing those photos and the mention of Furnace Creek brought back some really good memories. I hope I might be able to meet up with you guys on the next trip! Excellent write up! Looking forward to more...LMAO at Little Elvis by the way!!
 

BoarderDave

SoCal Beachaholic
#13
Man this is great! I love to see your trips like this. So well documented. Plus always full of beautiful rigs. hah. :D

Great to see so much use out of that amazing K10 you have. Very nice! Thanks for sharing the trip with us.
 

Larry

Bigassgas Explorer
#14
What Larry fails to mention is that I called for the spots after watching his left rear wheel run halfway over washouts at the crux on several tight corners...and he was running the shortest wheelbase of the three! I'm not bashful and he was gracious about it! While it's true that Lippincott is not particularly technical you are pretty much committed once you begin. With the exception of the turnout we camped in, I'm not sure where you would turn around. About halfway through I wondered why I would be taking my "once again" daily driver on this trail in the middle of Death/Saline Valley. As it turned out, no regrets...none.

Larry's doing a great job of reporting and I'll sit back and read along until I figure out how to post some of my pics. What a great group of fellow travelers to spend a couple of days with. I'm thankful for the invite. :sombrero:
Yeah, I was noticing Ty's rear tire riding the edge of the tight washed out corners. The Mighty Dodge Ram and it's pilot did well on Lippincott! So glad you could make it, we really had a great time and enjoyed your company.

Larry, what a really cool and fun trip! It inspired me to either go on the next one (if invited of course) or take one soon enough with my little family in tow. I actually lived in Beatty, NV (who can say that) when I was young into my teenage years. I have seen most of DV from the back of my dad's touring bike when I was too young to drive. Seeing those photos and the mention of Furnace Creek brought back some really good memories. I hope I might be able to meet up with you guys on the next trip! Excellent write up! Looking forward to more...LMAO at Little Elvis by the way!!
You're right, I've never known anybody from Beatty! We'll have to talk next time we head to that area.

Man this is great! I love to see your trips like this. So well documented. Plus always full of beautiful rigs. hah. :D

Great to see so much use out of that amazing K10 you have. Very nice! Thanks for sharing the trip with us.
Glad you like. It was an awesome trip!



Day 6: Thursday, March 28th – Death Valley
Goal: Continue having fun!

So Thursday morning got off to an exciting start. As I crawled out of the camper and stepped off the tailgate to relieve myself I see a lightening streak of a lizard shooting from under my foot with a path of blood trailing him. At first I thought it was a snake then I looked at my shoe and there was his poor severed squirming tail stuck to it. Poor little guy.

We never really got the camper perfectly level the night before and I think MIL must have slept with her head towards the low side because I am not sure what she was thinking Thursday morning when she passed me my morning coffee. One big gulp and I about burnt my complete face off! This must have been the hottest coffee in the entire Death Valley! My tongue is still fried! She normally made luke warm coffee.

Poor Mr. LeeZard…He just sat there glaring at me the entire time we packed up the camper while muttering something about me breaking his tail off.


GoPro leaving camp Thursday morning. The clutch release bearing makes a lot of noise when it is cold. Interesting pucker spot at 4:15. Another at 13:08. Of course I had to stop in the middle and get some pictures.

View from the driver's door


MIL snapped a picture of the right front tire at the hill side. This picture ss actually far away from the hill. Many times we were right up to it in order to keep the left side of the truck on the trail.


Picture she took at the 13:08 spot where she jumped out. This spot wasn't that bad and not nearly has tight as the others we had already crossed.


View of Saline Valley below. Ty's Dodge rounding one of the switch backs


The Mighty Dodge Ram behind. He is now at the spot where I just took the picture above.


Little Elvis was complaining that the roads were so rough and puckery the day before we never took time to take a picture of him but he wanted proof for his Facebook page that he had been on Lippincott. So, here tis folks…..


Well it was bound to happen. We no sooner did we get Little Elvis back in the cab when he and Jake the Snake started fighting. We had no choice but to separate them and Jake had to ride the rest of the way home in the Trasheroo. A snake and a duck in the same truck can only get along for so long you know.


So here we are….at the intersection of Lippincott and Saline Valley Rd.






As we tootled up towards Grapevine Canyon looking back at Saline Valley


As we were winding our way up through Grapevine Canyon we stumbled across what would become our two new best friends for the next 5 hours. My buddy was a bit in front of me and jumped out of his truck as he rounded a canyon corner waving me to stop. I figured there might be some vehicles coming down. Then he waved me up (our Cobra's were dead so we had to rely on hand signals). I get up there and see this poor guy trying to prop up a dual sport motorcycle. As it turned out the bike just lost all electrical power and died as he was coming down the canyon and almost laid down on him. Behind the motorcycle was a sweet 1st gen 4Runner loaded with many fuel cans. We learned there was a dual sport motorcycle rally thing taking place the upcoming weekend and they were out setting up fuel stations in the desert to support the racers. The bike that broke down as actually a bike being prepped for a round the world tour and was being used in Death Valley for this race as a validation run. Good thing they gave it a good test drive before heading off to Africa!

We helped the guys look over the bike for obvious blown fuses, chaffed wires, etc. Being a car guy, looking at one of these bikes is like looking up the tailend of a space ship. He asked if we were headed to Panamint and we replied that was indeed our plans. He asked if we could stop in the camp ground and let the other riders know he was broken down. Just then my buddy Ty spoke up and said, “heck, we'll do better than that. Let's just throw your bike in the back of my truck and we'll carry it back to camp for you”. The guys eyeballs about popped out of his head in amazement that someone would do that for him. The two guys were supper cool and fun to hang out with for the next 4-5 hour trail ride into Panamint.

“I dunno what happened, it just died!”



This GoPro begins at the dry creek bed we scooped up the motorcycle




A beautiful random valley seen from the top of Grapevine Canyon. This is not the Race Track, but it sorta looks like it.


So we finally get off the trail and onto Hwy 190 to head on into Panamint. Here Mighty Dodge Ram and I stopped to air up. Ty's never let much air out the tires on his Dodge so he and the 4Runner kept on trucking towards Panamint.


Scenery on the way to Panamint


We arrived at the campground in Panamint and help offload the bike and said our goodbyes to our new friends. The bike rider (he actually owned the sweet 4Runner too) handed my buddy a whad of cash, which of course my buddy handed it back. Well, this went back and forth a few times and Pablo said he insisted we take the money and go across the street to the little restaurant and have lunch on him then stock the beer coolers with whatever is left. Okay, we'll do it since he put it that way. Since that day we have been email pals with Pablo and hope to meet up with him at the Overland Expo in May.

Check out the price of fuel in Panamint! Thankfully, our trucks didn't need fuel but we topped off with a few gallons just because we didn't know where we were headed next or when the next fueling opportunity would be.


Day 6 to be continued….
 
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Larry

Bigassgas Explorer
#15
Day 6 continued…

By the time we offloaded the bike and ate lunch it was pretty late in the day to go find the Charles Manson place or hit up Titus Canyon as we had hoped. With that, we just headed out of Panamint about 8 miles to hit a trail that ran us out into a large open valley.





We took a little hike up the big hill behind us. View of our camp from the top


Looking back at the road we came in. This spot is only 10ish miles from Hwy 190


My MIL being crazy with a hoola hoop. Why do we have a hoola hoop you say? Well, this was her invention she came up with since last year’s desert trip…..the hoola hoop is used to help support the 4 strings that suspend the shower stall. Without something to hold the 4 corners apart the square shower turns in to a diamond and make it hard to shower. If there was no wind…ever, that wouldn’t be an issue but it is always breezy/windy in the desert.


That is it for day 6….:coffeedrink:

More soon....
 
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