DIY Composite Flatbed Camper Build

OK thanks. I think those extrusions mostly tidy up the edges and are not structural. The other build series videos just use glue. I think I will test the Henkel product, nothing like finding out for yourself! (There is an impressive shot of the guy hanging from overhead cabinets that are just glued to the walls
watch from 3.45). Cheers.
 
Don't mean to hijack but the Henkels terostat is a great product, super easy to work with an cleans up easy. It is sold under Loctite Terson NA 939 name in the US, black or white. Total composites has another manufacturers version, at least I think they are similar technology.
 
First real shake down: Just took a 7 day trip to Saint Louis and Elsah Illinois. Put close to 2k miles in. While no off-roading, it sure seemed like it with the poor road conditions surrounding St Louis.
Through all the bumps and jolts the camper did not budge. It's amazing what a few lag bolts and Sika flex will do:)

The first night was hot and humid, AC was a must. With no hook ups, the AC ran for approx. 8 to 9 hours before the bms turned off the batteries. I figured this would happen and would need to recharge the next day. Little did I know that lithium will not simply recharge once the discharge limit has been reached. After a few phone calls and the help of a friend of a friend, I learned that the bms disconnects to protect the lithium from full discharge. In order to get it to reconnect and start accepting charge, a jump charge is needed. Thankfully I always carry a portable air compressor with built in jumper cables. So I connected to the inverter at the positive and negative terminals, flipped the switch and we were back in business.

While we didn't technically camp, we did live out of the camper the entire time. The Magnum inverter/charger was used once to bring the batteries up to charge. Other than this the REDARC did a great job with Solar and vehicle charging.
 
I've been rethinking the compost toilet option after reading a recent thread about a family of four and how they only dumped twice in 6 weeks.
I steered away from this option due to size, however after learning about the C-Head, I may be reconsidering.
Anybody have experience with this model or thoughts in general?
 
I've read a lot of good things about the C-Head.

Only issue that stuck out to me was getting the dreaded "gnats" or whatever little flies they are. Seems like once they get in the vehicle from the crapper, no matter what you do to the crapper they are damned hard to get rid of them. Don't recall what they were, though...
 
I've read a lot of good things about the C-Head.

Only issue that stuck out to me was getting the dreaded "gnats" or whatever little flies they are. Seems like once they get in the vehicle from the crapper, no matter what you do to the crapper they are damned hard to get rid of them. Don't recall what they were, though...
Thanks for the reply, good to know.
 
Pulled the trigger on the C-Head http://c-head.com/. Wife thought I should build my own and use the money for other things than a toilet.
Probably could have but glad I didn't. I must say how impressed I was with the quality, fit and finish of this product. The website does not do it justice.
Having done the black tank, then the cassette, and now a compost toilet, I hope this will be what everyone who owns a composting toilet says it
will be,....wonderful :) The main reason for this purchase is size and ease of use. Install was easy. Here are some pics of the unit beside the Curve Cassette and in the camper.
 

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Recently returned from a trip to Missouri and learned a few things.
First though, third time was the charm for the drain. The two pvc 90's lined up and fit together for a smooth flow.
Also an easy way to line up the truck and camper for loading; while camper is on the stand, back truck as close as possible and align before lifting.
This makes it easier for a direct back up with out turning the wheels.
 

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Compost toilet; takes some adjustment but overall it is definitely "more pleasant?" and easier to empty than the curve cassette.
I did learn that its important to put the right amount of median in the bucket or it will smell smell smell. Also cedar does a better job
than pine. One important thing to note for newbies and the C-head. Cover the crank hole with TP until you get the positioning down,
just saying:)
I did end up installing the exhaust vent. Went through the back wall of the bathroom and vented out through existing propane compartment vent.
 

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While on our trip we never needed any shore power. I'm very impressed and happy with the performance of these drop in Lithium batteries.
I finally read up on the Magnum battery monitor and it tells me everything from state of charge to amps coming in and being used. The lowest SOC observed
was around 65%. This was running induction cooktop, microwave and hair blow dryer. After an hour or so of driving and solar, the batteries were back to 100%
by the end of the day. Another feature to note about the magnum inverter/charger is that it has a custom charge setting. It will charge to maximum voltage setting then
sit idle until a minimum voltage is detected. This seems to be perfect for the Lith's.
I had read somewhere that you should never deplete lithium batteries. However, as mentioned before, the bms in the drop ins protected against this when I ran the AC at night
for approx. 8 hrs.
Found this video interesting;
 
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