Downsides to ambulances

Bikersmurf

Expedition Leader
I'd start looking now so you'll be ready to jump when the right deal comes up. I got lucky when I started looking, and found a deal too good to pass up. If you start looking when you're ready to jump it may cost you way more.
 

flightcancled

Explorer
If you're really going to built "something someday" it is never too early to start collecting parts. It will save you money and you can chip away at stuff that will tie you up later..
 

350outrage

Adventurer
Security. Loosing an expensive motorcycle off an open trailer is easy. These things are not keyed, not registered/plated, and-most troubling-not insured.

I prefer to think of it as sleeping in the garage vs parking the bike in your bedroom. Although I won't lie, I've done both. :sombrero:
This is also why traditional class B's don't work for my intended use; they are way too nice inside.

Took a shot through CL last night. Something changed while I wasn't looking and there are a lot more T1N sprinters available in my market than last time I looked. Also warm to that E350 cutaway 10' box truck option. Especially with the single rear wheels. Dualies are more road tax, more tolls. One of you cats did this. I dig it.

Can you put one of these on a Sprinter:


Total weight on the hitch receiver would be in the 450-500 lbs ballpark.
I d/k if a Sprinter would do it , but my E-350 would do it with its eyes closed!
 

mhiscox

Expedition Leader
One thing that hasn't gotten mentioned as an advantage of internal or hitch-mounted transport versus the trailer is that California--and, I assume, other states--have dramatically lower speed limits for vehicles when towing, On a California interstates, the speed limit is 70 mph, but only 55 when towing anything. I've found that 15 mph slower speed limit to be a reason to avoid towing things that can be transported another way.

(BTW--I asked on a forum a few years ago if the 55 mph limit was really enforced for small motorcycle-carrying and utility trailers and was told that it was, though not consistently. If anyone knows the situation these days to be otherwise, please let us know.)
 

nhbubba

New member
My experience towing a small trailer behind my car is that no one even blinks if you do 70-ish in a 65 MPH Interstate zone.
It's a fine point though.
 

pwrfool

New member
We do GNCC racing with a hitch mounted hauler like the one pictured. It is locked to the truck with a locking hitch pin, and then we have a "ladder lock" from a local home improvement store that goes through the frame of the bike and around the hauler. If you are using a truck to get to the races maybe a set u like this could replace the tent for cheap http://youtu.be/Z1yJWhRWBzA . For us taking the trailer would be nice, but we usually arrive late and finding a place to park a single vehicle is much easier.
 

boardrider247

Weekend warrior anarchist
One thing that hasn't gotten mentioned as an advantage of internal or hitch-mounted transport versus the trailer is that California--and, I assume, other states--have dramatically lower speed limits for vehicles when towing, On a California interstates, the speed limit is 70 mph, but only 55 when towing anything. I've found that 15 mph slower speed limit to be a reason to avoid towing things that can be transported another way.

(BTW--I asked on a forum a few years ago if the 55 mph limit was really enforced for small motorcycle-carrying and utility trailers and was told that it was, though not consistently. If anyone knows the situation these days to be otherwise, please let us know.)
I towed this setup through California for three weeks about five years ago.


IMG_7302 by boardrider247, on Flickr

Honestly I tried to follow the 55mph rule for about ten minutes before having a whole group of bro dozers fly past me at 80mph towing boats, jet skis ect. Made up my mind I would rather face a ticket then be run down by a lifted F350 and ignored the 55 limit for the rest of the trip. It proved to be a none issue for me ymmv.
 

nhbubba

New member
If you are using a truck to get to the races maybe a set u like this could replace the tent for cheap http://youtu.be/Z1yJWhRWBzA . For us taking the trailer would be nice, but we usually arrive late and finding a place to park a single vehicle is much easier.
My dilemma with a truck vs a van of some sort is:

A) Used trucks tend to be very expensive in my area. For some reason nobody buys regular old pickup trucks anymore. The used market seems flooded with exactly two trucks; the beat to hell work truck that has 200k miles of "not my truck, who cares" on it and the $40k luxury SUV that originally MSRP'ed for $60k cleverly disguised as a pickup truck.
B) Bottom line is that a comparable van is about the same price and offers better utility for my (single guy) needs. Even the roomiest pickup cap is tight quarters compared to the smallest van. And then there is the security aspect.
C) Just about anything your pickup can do, a van can do too. Only upside I see to a pickup is better 4WD availability. I don't need (or want to pay for) 4WD. .. Oh, and a lot of chicks don't dig vans.
D) I'd rather have a van. Been there, done that with the pickup truck thing.

No. I'll go van or box truck. As of now there are three major contenders:

1) 3/4 ton (250/2500 series) domestic standard height van with a gas V8. I like the Chevy Express 2500 best at the moment. - Basic low-buck build out similar to your video, entirely modular.
2) Go for the gold with a high roof Sprinter. T1N, 140" wheelbase please. Maybe a Nissan NV2500 high roof instead, maybe. - Medium build out, mostly modular. Miss race season because I'm broke after paying for the van.
3) Ambulance. Ford F or E-series. Late 90's/early 00's. 7.3L turbo diesel. - Huge project, gut and build out to my wildest dream. Miss most of the next race season because "the van's not done yet!" Pray I can stay ahead of the frame rust.

Still haven't made a decision amongst those players. Biggest thing holding me back is I don't want to pay two road taxes, two insurance premiums, and upkeep on two vehicles. And I don't want to commute in a 3/4 or 1-ton commercial vehicle. Life is tough sometimes.
 
Top