eatSleepWoof's 2016 Tacoma DCLB

The biggest issue now will be deciding which tools to keep in the garage, and which in the workshop. I'm thinking anything woodworking-related goes in the shop, and metal-related (more likely to be directly applicable to the truck) will be in the garage. I'm going to need a LOT of workbenches.
I did that when I moved into our current house 7 years ago, which was the first house in 35 years that had anything like a shop (actually a basement). What I have finally realized (I’m a slow learner) is that I was always running from shop to garage to get tools or materials. This summer I started moving more into the garage (big one was table saw, plus lumber in an overhead rack I built). Things I rarely need, whether automotive or woodworking, are migrating to the basement. It’s working well for now, though maybe I’ll change it again a few years. Note I had no dust collection in the basement, just a shop vac, and got lazy about cleaning up so everything got covered in sawdust. No worries I just roll the table saw into the driveway. That’s working so far ... but winter hasn’t started yet.
 
I did that when I moved into our current house 7 years ago, which was the first house in 35 years that had anything like a shop (actually a basement). What I have finally realized (I’m a slow learner) is that I was always running from shop to garage to get tools or materials. This summer I started moving more into the garage (big one was table saw, plus lumber in an overhead rack I built). Things I rarely need, whether automotive or woodworking, are migrating to the basement. It’s working well for now, though maybe I’ll change it again a few years. Note I had no dust collection in the basement, just a shop vac, and got lazy about cleaning up so everything got covered in sawdust. No worries I just roll the table saw into the driveway. That’s working so far ... but winter hasn’t started yet.
That's what I'm afraid of, too. Having to run back & fourth all the time. But hey, won't be any worse than taking the elevator in a condo, as I've been doing all my life. I'll see how it goes and make adjustments as necessary!
 
Since you mentioned dust collection I'd highly recommend the dust deputy. They are 60 on Amazon then you just need a bucket (preferably metal), lid, hose, and a few fittings. Perfect for a "garage shop" since it only takes up the room of a bucket. I got one when i got sick of cleaning sawdust off everything.

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A few weeks ago I took out the dog platform, lifted most of the carpet in the interior, and added MLV sound deadening material under both front seats. I then replaced the storage cubbies behind the seats (a nightmare of a task given the roughly ~1/4"-3/16" of extra sound deadening material I added there), and re-installed the rear seats. The dog now rides on top of rear seats, on a hammock-style seat cover (one that I had before). The truck is noticeably quieter yet again.

I got rid of my Pelfreybilt gas-tank skid plate - it now lives on Aaen's truck. Have also removed the fridge, slide, hi-lift, and a bunch of other weight that I don't need to be carrying around on a daily basis. It sounds like I have a buyer for my Decked system, so if all goes well, that will be gone in a week's time.

I plan to build a (yet another) drawer on the passenger side of the bed, leaving the driver's side empty. This will save me a lot of weight (over the Decked setup), give me more usable space (vertical walls + taller), and will let me mount the fridge slide a lot quicker and easier.

I am debating whether I want to get a front hitch/receiver bar and mount the winch on a portable tray, or pony up for a hidden winch mount (and possibly the ARB recovery point). Regretting selling the brand new SSO front bumper a few months ago. I like the idea of the winch being portable, but I don't like the idea of having to carry it from rear of the truck to the front, when I actually need to use it. If I need the winch, I'm probably stuck, at an angle or incline, and in snow. Carrying a bulky ~70lbs in those situations won't always be safe. Decisions, decisions...

In the meantime I've been working on cleaning up the garage. This is what I started with:



The walls are all in poor condition with a ton of holes everywhere. The shelving added by the previous owners was done horribly, and is pulling out from the drywall in many spots (not anchored to studs). I want to get rid of all of it and re-do things properly.

First of all, I added two overhead lights at 5000 lumens each. Might add a few more down the line - they can be chained.



Then I picked the least-cluttered corner of one wall, patched the couple dozen screw holes, painted it a different colour, installed new baseboards, and painted the baseboards + two door frames:



I then added french cleats all along that section of the wall. Each cleat is made from 3/4" ply and easily holds my 200lb weight (tested).



I mounted the bicycles:



Then made a shelf for recycling:





And today I mounted the paper towel holder, dog stuff, and fire extinguisher:



... phew! Time to visit the hot tub and take a break.

In the near future I will be installing my ARB twin compressor & hooking it up to the rear locker, as well as installing the new Bussman fuse/relay block under the hood. Then I plan to somehow mount the 20" Baja Designs lightbar that's been sitting in a box for three or four months now.

Oh, and this is what the workshop (downstairs) looks like:



It also needs a proper build out.

So much to do, so little time.
 

jgaz

Adventurer
The French cleat system looks great! The advantage the flexibility gives you can’t be overrated IMO.
How about a close up where the bike hanger contacts the bike frame or wheel.

You are on the right track, one step at a time, ability to change your storage set up, overbuild, all good things.

It looks like the previous owner started in this direction, but my suggestion is to size your top shelf for a common, but specific, size storage tote and make that tote fit close to the ceiling.
 
my suggestion is to size your top shelf for a common, but specific, size storage tote and make that tote fit close to the ceiling.
That's a good idea. I'm not 100% sure I'll have a top-shelf all around, but I like your suggestion of size and location - makes good sense!

Here are some close ups of the bike mounts:



\

This is a dual-cleat design for my (relatively) light bike. Note that the weight & leverage of the bike does slightly pull the cleat away from the wall, but not enough to be a problem. For the other bike I did a triple-cleat design which is rock solid.
 
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I am debating whether I want to get a front hitch/receiver bar and mount the winch on a portable tray, or pony up for a hidden winch mount (and possibly the ARB recovery point). Regretting selling the brand new SSO front bumper a few months ago. I like the idea of the winch being portable, but I don't like the idea of having to carry it from rear of the truck to the front, when I actually need to use it. If I need the winch, I'm probably stuck, at an angle or incline, and in snow. Carrying a bulky ~70lbs in those situations won't always be safe. Decisions, decisions...
The nice thing about having a portable winch and receivers on the front / rear is that you have the option of using the winch on the front or back of the truck as required.
 
The nice thing about having a portable winch and receivers on the front / rear is that you have the option of using the winch on the front or back of the truck as required.
Definitely. It's also the cheaper setup: a Mobtown front receiver is something like $400USD, and has two built-in recovery points. Between a hidden winch mount and a separate recovery point (likely the ARB one), I'd be looking at around $700. The cost of a portable, hitch-mountable winch tray isn't too bad - under $100.

It's the need to carry the winch around in potentially poor/dangerous conditions that has me concerned. I read a thread here that debated these same winch mounting options and one poster recalled slipping and dropping his portable winch on his chest; he was rightly concerned that if that winch had hit his head, he could have been in very serious trouble.
 
Which winch do you have? I have a warn M8000 with synthetic. It's not too bad, I believe 36-37lb with the rope (but not the solenoid or power wires.). My notes are incomplete but I think the total with wires and mounting bolts and the big stock solenoid box is around 47ish. I'm not sure if there are any aluminum multi mount kits out there but if you used short wires and a small solid state solenoid you might be able to get the weight down around 50something. It's still a lot of weight to carry around when slick out but could be manageable.

Are there any aluminum mounting systems out there for the Tacoma yet?
 
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