electric blankets 12V?

barbasol

New member
I found a 3/4 length 12v electric blanket on Amazon. Wife and I use it to get the rtt warmed up and turn it off after a couple hours. Can’t recall the battery draw. We used a goal zero yeti 400 and I recall it bring drained after leaving the blanket on all night. We have a bigger battery now but wouldn’t run it all night either way. Good to take the chills out going to bed and waking up, the dog fills in during the night
 

billiebob

Well-known member
My parents slept under the same electric blanket for 50 years.... I'm just more comfortable under 2 winter hunter flannel lined sleeping bags. Electric blankets are way more efficient than heating the air... plus they work just as well in an uninsulated tent.

I still prefer lots of flannel....
DSC_0114.jpeg
 

67cj5

Man On a Mission
I posted my results about 12v electric blankets in another thread, And I found they used a lot less power than people think, Some Had built in timers some did not, Also how you use them has a big impact on how warm they are with zero increase in power draw,

Over a 2 week period I used them on my Bed and as a wrap measuring the power draw along with the heat produced while still using less than half of the power that an average 240v unit would use, Most of these 12v blankets are a lot better than people think if you workout how to use them so they are most effective,

I was so impressed with the outcome had me buy a proper 240v version for my bed but that does not take anything away from the 12v units,

I bought 2 X 12v units with 45 minute Timers and 2 without Timers and I prefer the Non Timer Versions but On a limited power supply the version with the Timer is the best way to go where the power draw would not worry even the smallest Jackery.
 

krick3tt

Adventurer
I use this, powered from my Jackery. Run it about 1 hour then reset. Power it most of the night and it only draws about 20% of the Jackery.
 

Wallygator

Adventurer


I use this one and sleep on top of it, heat rises. Power cuts off after 45 minutes and I'm usually asleep by then. I also prefer blankets and comforters vs. sleeping bags. Works well.
 

Wallygator

Adventurer
This guy is testing an electric heater to temporarily warm the cab at night and in the am to get dressed, then uses a 12V blanket for sleep....

 

Mtpisgah

Active member
We have used hot water in Nalgene bottles to warm the bags, they work great and are still warm in the morning.

We have used the big dry chemical heater packs to keep our feet warm. I cannot tell a big difference but my wife swears by them.

We have a 12v 3/4 blanket from Amazon that we preheat with and then turn off about and hour in bed. Sometimes we turn it back on around 3am and off when I wake to pee. Back on for 30 minutes before we get out of bed.

The blanket is the best option in my opinion.
 

rruff

Explorer
I tried searching but could not really find anything. We camped in our GFC and it got down in the 20's and it got pretty cold. I don't really want to use a diesel heater and I know a propane heater will cause a lot more moisture than we already get from just breathing. Has anyone found a 12V electric blanket/pad that works? If so better to sleep on top of it or use on top? how much power do they take? My wife and I much prefer sleeping with traditional blankets and down comforter vs sleeping bags. Thanks
I think the best use of a 12v blanket is to warm the bed so it's not a shock when you strip and climb in. Maybe fire it up in the morning before you climb out if you've gotten cold in the night. It shouldn't be hard to get blankets that work well in the 20s.

They use 4-5A, 50-60W typically on high. If you wanted to use it all night, that would be fine also if you have the capacity. A human body at rest dissipates around 100W, so it's less than having someone to snuggle with, or warm up the bed for you... ;)
 

67cj5

Man On a Mission
I think the best use of a 12v blanket is to warm the bed so it's not a shock when you strip and climb in. Maybe fire it up in the morning before you climb out if you've gotten cold in the night. It shouldn't be hard to get blankets that work well in the 20s.

They use 4-5A, 50-60W typically on high. If you wanted to use it all night, that would be fine also if you have the capacity. A human body at rest dissipates around 100W, so it's less than having someone to snuggle with, or warm up the bed for you... ;)
!2v electric Blankets use between 2.4 and 3.6Ah and the ones with the 45 minute timer chew 30.62w and the ones that don't have the built in timer can vary up to 45w,

I bought 4 differant models two months ago and tested them and they are a great option, Double them over and the heat is about as good as the ones people use at home because it put more heating elements in the same area.
 

hilgeg

Member
We picked up one of these for warming up after boating, but started using it below our sleeping bags in the RTT, and now it goes with us every trip.
(Won't let me post the amazon link)
RoadPro BlackCanyon Outfitters RPHB-110DB 12-Volt Polar Fleece Heated Travel Blanket

Easily runs all night hooked to one 100ah deep cycle battery.
 

tall

New member
!2v electric Blankets use between 2.4 and 3.6Ah and the ones with the 45 minute timer chew 30.62w and the ones that don't have the built in timer can vary up to 45w,

I bought 4 differant models two months ago and tested them and they are a great option, Double them over and the heat is about as good as the ones people use at home because it put more heating elements in the same area.
I found your review of the Eluto. Did you publish info on the others you tested? Would love to see the results. Thank you.
 

PlacidWaters

Adventurer
I think an electric blanket would be nice, but it's not that hard to stay warm at 20 degrees F. A zero-degree Fahrenheit down sleeping bag (used quilt style if you don't want to zip it up) and a hat will do it. The trick is to be warm when you go to bed and to preheat the sleeping bag. A large plastic water bottle filled with very hot (boiling) water will give you a good warm start. Use that to warm up the foot area before you go to bed, and a second bottle against your chest if needed. If you had an electric blanket in addition to the sleeping bag, I think you would get too warm at some point. Down has an amazing ability to trap and hold heat. At home I don't heat the upstairs bedrooms. I use a down comforter and if the outside temperature is 20 or above I open the window. Even then I eventually get too warm, even with just a t-shirt and shorts. I'm not a warm sleeper---it's just the magic of down.
 
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