Electric Chain Saw???

jacobconroy

Hillbilly of Leisure
I've been trying to talk myself into buying a chain saw for years...just can't do it. Hauling the saw + gas + oil + tools for something I only need once each year seems like a lot of work.

But, yesterday I saw one of the new electric Stihl saws . Anybody tried one? I think this might be what I need. Small, light, easy to use. Some research suggests that the saw with two charged batteries would get through a reasonable one or two night trips. I don't require a whole lot of fire wood. Might want to cut a tree out of the road here and there.

Or, do I just need to bite the bullet and buy a gas saw? I'd be interested to hear thoughts from those with experience.
 

kb1ejh

Member
Since I had a Black and Decker weed trimmer for a few spots in the yard I went the the Black and Decker chainsaw probably 5 or more years ago, time flies. I already had the batteries and charger so I didn't want to get something different. The Stihl unit looks like a good deal. Since your only looking to cut up a little and not be a lumberjack you'll probably do fine with it. I am happy with the battery one for what I need. Once in a great while I wish I had a gasser but then I am done with the job so I have stuck with what I have. You'll still need bar oil for the chain and tools for chain maintenance but not much. The good side is you don't need the gas/oil mix to carry around. If you have 110V AC you could even recharge the battery while you're out too, easier than running out of gas...
 

jacobconroy

Hillbilly of Leisure
I would think it takes a while to get through an 8 or 10 inch log with a sawzall. Do you cut logs that large with it?
 

Rallyroo

Expedition Leader
Will you haul the gas chainsaw inside your Jeep? In your adventure trailer? Because it'll leave an oily mess everywhere and stink up the interior. With a gas chainsaw you'll also have to adjust the carburetor to work at the elevation you're at whether sea level or high in the mountains.

I'm seeing more folks on using electrical chainsaws for occasional use. YouTuber Ronny Dahl in Australia used a Ryobi electric chainsaw to clear a tree from the trail. I use an axe for the rare time a small tree blocks my path. Too big of a tree and I'm going to find an alternate route.
 

jacobconroy

Hillbilly of Leisure
Will you haul the gas chainsaw inside your Jeep? In your adventure trailer? Because it'll leave an oily mess everywhere and stink up the interior. With a gas chainsaw you'll also have to adjust the carburetor to work at the elevation you're at whether sea level or high in the mountains.

I'm seeing more folks on using electrical chainsaws for occasional use. YouTuber Ronny Dahl in Australia used a Ryobi electric chainsaw to clear a tree from the trail. I use an axe for the rare time a small tree blocks my path. Too big of a tree and I'm going to find an alternate route.
Good questions. I tell myself that I'd haul the saw on the Jeep's rear rack with gas if fuel is needed. But I won't. Too worried about people stealing my swag and too lazy to move things in and out of the Jeep all the time :) So, it will need to be kept in the Jeep somewhere. I rarely take the adventure trailer when I go anywhere (and probably should sell it). Thanks for mentioning the "oily mess" problem. Since I haven't had a saw I wouldn't have know about that. I'm not a mechanic either.

I pack a Snow Peak fireplace in the Jeep and it's very efficient. A 9-inch round lasts about one hour. If I plan to have a camp fire for appr,. 6 hours at night then I don't need to do much sawing. I'm liking the electric saw idea more and more.
 

cdthiker

Meandering Idaho
A few points.

I have found that the Batt powered chain saws are great for cutting small limbs and brush but not much else. I will admit to not having used one recently. However, the problem that I ran into was lack of power and time consumed.

Second. A properly stored and cleaned saw will not leave an oily mess. If you dump gas an oil all over the place upon filling it then sure. It will stink and leave a mess.

You can also put it in a plastic case if this is a worry.

Third. The newer saws you do not need to adjust the carb for altitude. They have a " smart carb" system. In short, the only thing you ever have to adjust is the chain tightness and how fast you want it to idel. a chain saw socket wrench with a flat head build into the end is the only tool you need to carry. I have used my sthil saw from 2,000 feet in elevation up to nearly 9 thousand feet. No problems

fourth. A full tank of gas in the saw tank will most likely be more then enough for what you would need. I can drop a 20 inch round tree limb it and buck most of not all of it with one tank of gas. If you need more toss some in an MSR camp fuel bottle and its good to go and wont leak on you.

Finally, After extensive time in new england, the south west, and rocky mountain region, I have never been in a spot where I have not been able to find all of the fire wood that I need laying dead and on the ground. Not only is it a much lower impact option, but it saves you the trouble of having a chain saw. Just food for thought.

If you have the money to spend, look at one of the small but powerfull top handle sthil tree climbing saws. They are lightweight, verhy compact, will fit under a seat and pack a lot of punch.
 

FJR Colorado

Explorer
I recently purchased the DeWalt 60V chainsaw and I was blown away. It truly is amazing. SO much easier than trying to mix gas and fire up a 2-stroke chainsaw at 10,000 feet.

Incidentally, I bought the unit with just the 1x 9Ah battery. I was concerned since it is rated at 70 cuts. I was able to do a lot more than that. In fact, I wore out before the saw did.

Also, since I have tons of 20V lithium DeWalt batteries, I also picked up the smaller 20V chainsaw. That too is just a freaking warrior. Not as robust as the 60V unit, but much lighter and great for small jobs.

It's a completely different style with the electric. You don't need ear protection, it's not constantly running, you take your time and plan cuts better.

These are absolutely amazing tools for building trails. You really can use your mind and plan much better.
 

towee

Member
I carry an 18v sawzall like jeep n Montero the batteries are useful for a lot of other 18v tools I carry and the sawzall is great for firewood and small log cutting. Versatile, smaller foot print less weight.
 

SportsmanJake

Adventurer
I carry a husqvarna, 1 can of pre-mixed fuel, one bottle of bar oil, a wedge, an extra chain.
It just works. Sure it takes up extra room, but I use it enough that it has earned a spot. If you are going to carry a chain saw, you might as well as carry a real one.

That being said, I've never owned an electric saw. The only way I can see it being viable is if you are already carrying batteries for that tool line. For example, Dewalt's 20v system.
 

AML

Adventurer
I recently purchased the DeWalt 60V chainsaw and I was blown away. It truly is amazing. SO much easier than trying to mix gas and fire up a 2-stroke chainsaw at 10,000 feet.

Incidentally, I bought the unit with just the 1x 9Ah battery. I was concerned since it is rated at 70 cuts. I was able to do a lot more than that. In fact, I wore out before the saw did.

Also, since I have tons of 20V lithium DeWalt batteries, I also picked up the smaller 20V chainsaw. That too is just a freaking warrior. Not as robust as the 60V unit, but much lighter and great for small jobs.

It's a completely different style with the electric. You don't need ear protection, it's not constantly running, you take your time and plan cuts better.

These are absolutely amazing tools for building trails. You really can use your mind and plan much better.
I second this chainsaw. I bought this some time ago and am also impressed with it. It was easier for me to swallow because I had a few of the flexvolt 60v batteries for a bunch of other tools. Check out the videos on youtube. Pretty impressive
 

Coachgeo

Explorer
electric is all that I use..... but not battery. IMHO they sell battery units at cost or loss to sucker you into having to buy expensive battery replacements for years to come.

Granted I'm talking about the house. You got to fuss with extension cords.... but that is heck a lot better than fussing with mixing fuel, engines that don't want to start..... winterizing etc etc. Small generator if you need to get further out and they are suprisngly far easier of a an engine to maintain than one in a chainsaw. For my Overlander I'll stick with electric too but it will have a genny and a invertertor as well.
 

Boatbuilder79

Active member
Eaither a Gas saw or an axe and bow saw.

If you Keep the saw gassed up oiled up and sharp it will not take up any more space than a battery saw and will cut a lot longer.

Carry a spare small bottle of 2 stroke oil in your tool kit. If you need to cut that much you can mix up some more gas. You should have gas in your truck. You can use the same motor oil as your truck for your bar and chain and it will work fine. You carry an extra quart of oil right?

Coleman stoves and lanterns work on gas too.
 

jacobconroy

Hillbilly of Leisure
Interesting thread. While visiting my brother in law tonight I noticed he had a Stihl MS 261 and I have been eyeballing that model for years. It looks like a nifty little saw.

Coachgeo...do gas saws need to be winterized? I had planned to keep my saw in the Jeep year round. Freezing or not.
 
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