Filson Jackets input.

#16
I've owned several Filson jackets and think they look incredible - especially as they age. I don't have any at this point, I've sold them because I think that there are just better products out there...not as durable, but they insulate better. In the rain/wind the oil cloth materials were super - but when the sun came out I overheated quickly in them, and the oil stained the seats on my truck. The Mackinaw Cruiser is a beautiful coat, loved it - but when the wind blew it didn't insulate as well as my Goretex mountain jackets. Filson: Nice product, they look great, are very expensive...but IMO, just not up to par with some of the newer products on the market.
 
#17
I'm a little late to the party to give feed back to Capt Eddie on his purchase, but maybe future thread readers will find this useful...

I have the Tin Cloth Field Jacket and the full sleeve zip-in Mackinaw Wool Jacket. I purchased the field jacket because I wanted a durable coat for working around the property, camping, walking dogs in fields, off-roading, and other similar activities. My field jacket is my general 'go-to' coat and I often just leave it in the truck so I have it when I need it. It has definitely met my requirements.

Waxed Tin Cloth transmits cold, and it is a very heavy fabric. So, the wool zip-in is great for temperatures 30F and below because it adds insulation to the shoulders. For very cold weather (0F and lower) I definitely layer with some type of zip neck first layer and a bunting/fleece pullover under the wool and jacket. I have used a down jacket under the field jacket in place of the wool, but the weight of the tin cloth compresses the down so it doesn't provide full insulation at the shoulders.

I don't think the tin cloth is the best choice for high exertion activities or where weight is important. There are much better solutions for backpacking, back-country skiing, ... But those fabrics don't last long for me when working in dirty conditions (fences, laying under a truck, cutting wood, ...).

So, like many questions on this forum, once you define how the coat will be used it will be easier to decide if waxed tin cloth and wool is the 'best' choice.
 
#19
That heavy wool jacket should be warm enough for the amount of time you'll be out. Nome could be warmer than you're expecting though. Check out the forecast for the next couple days-highs in the 30s. Normal? No, but this winter has seen alot of abnormally warm weather all over AK. Chains for your boots? Doubt they'll be used, but wouldn't hurt to take them along.
 
#21
Report back from Nome Alaska. The Double Mackinaw did great. More then I expected. I was able to wear a fleece base layer with one wool sweater, a wind stopper travel vest and the Mackinaw jacket. The temperature only got down to 0 degree. Only one time when the winds got to 30MPH did I feel the cold air blowing through the sleeves of the jacket. I should have brought a heavier hat the wear. A wool skull cap did not make it. I am a firm believer in Bison wool products. The gloves alone were fine in those tempatures. But since I lost the hat before I left on the trip I guess I will never know how well it would have done. But I able to buy a Muskox wool hat. It is nice but at 0 degrees with wind ,it was still not enough.
 

MT6bt

Rock hound
#23
I think this thread deserves a refresher. I am becoming more and more biased towards filson products. Time and time again, they continue to impress me.
I've used their jack shirt on 5 day backpacking trips across the beartooth mountains, and it performed very well. Light enough to pack, albeit slightly bulky.
The single mackinaw jacket has got to be my favorite jacket I've ever owned. I've used it to trek around the side country, skiing, in town, and worked in it a few times. The fit is perfect -although layers underneath have to be fairly limited. I can't fit my Jac shirt very well because the cuffs are too big.
My Alaskan packer coat comes in a close second as my favorite. Only reason why it isn't my favorite is because the thing is so damned warm that I don't get to wear it much. I did try it out on the last day I went skiing and was very surprised to see that despite the warm conditions, the heavy snowfall, and falling down into powder several times, after brushing the snow off, the second layer absorbed no moisture. It breathed very well, too!


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#24
Not sure if your into modifying your new jacket or if it will make it too warm but what about sewing some buttons in it and adding a liner that you could take out and wash.

I'm thinking like the M65 field jacket and liner type of thing
 

MT6bt

Rock hound
#25
Not sure if your into modifying your new jacket or if it will make it too warm but what about sewing some buttons in it and adding a liner that you could take out and wash.

I'm thinking like the M65 field jacket and liner type of thing
Well, with a Jac shirt and a wool vest underneath this jacket, I was comfortable in west Yellowstone this year when temperatures were hovering around 0 with a 10mph wind. I'm not sure if a liner would be necessary. just a layer or two underneath it is almost too much at those temps!

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