Ford E350

dar395

Adventurer
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These are some photo's 1st showing use of the close cell insulation, 2nd Don't know what the he-- it is just added for your enjoyment & than the balance showing some of the mounting points for the cabinets in the last one you will see added support given using the Ikea mounting system again just a larger size.
 
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dar395

Adventurer
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Over the years as we've flip houses I had saved many items from Ikea and this van has been a benefactor from these parts, as I've started adding up my cost vs budget I cannot believe how little this van is going to cost! Along with simple reclaimed wood for bracing and a nice 5/4 board and some oak I removed from a basement I think my savings from resourcing and reclaiming has saved about $600 bucks!

Until I went to see about the purchase of a 1x6" oak board and some SS #8 screws for around $41 I did not understand how much my box was worth!
 

dar395

Adventurer
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In these photos you will see the sun blockers or drapes, the three part system that we used is Duck Cloth for the inside, Insul-thin for the center, and then Auto grade carpet for the window side. Not only do these block a lot of heat/sun but they also control outside noise and prying eye.

Just a simple snap for mounting.
 

dar395

Adventurer
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Used of mosaic tile in a very small size, here in 1/2" cubes with latex grout travel very well and hold up even over rough roads, this adds a little "home" fell and color for very little $$'s. These photo's are of the process, the polished tile will show at the completion.
 

dar395

Adventurer
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Again mounting brackets were made for all appliances, the Micro wave has a total of six mounting points. This is only a 700watt unit with the thoughts leaning towards the power system needs.

The 700watt micro wave was a little harder to fins, most seem to be 1000watts or larger, this one came from Wally World at a cost of just $27!

This unit is mounted to the platform and than mounted to the side units with the Ikea mounts for easy install/removal. Everything is mounted this way for easy maintenance or replacement.

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dar395

Adventurer
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Showing the use of the close-cell insulation on the 120v refrigerator, the heat exchange coils are mounted on the sides, these are left untouched and the "Holes" in the mount panels will provide needed cooling path. The door has been upgraded by using spray foam insulation for widows and doors by drilling holes inside and filling, The final trip is in place around the door to hide mounts and open space and insulation.

We're pushing for 5 days without need to charge batteries.
 

dar395

Adventurer
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Trying to keep the electric as clean as I can I have chosen to run two circuits (120v) from the distribution/fuse box to a single plug receptacle mounting in the side support wall panel by simply braking the connector bar between the two post screws as shown in the two photos above.

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Then by a simple purchase of a multi-plug unit that becomes a part of your cover plate you end up with three standard outlets three on each 120v circuits, the photo's show the correct con-fig of the multi-unit with the two plug/prongs for the split.

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The last photo shows nice, clean, simple and low cost!
 

dar395

Adventurer
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The other single plug unit is coming off my power invertor providing 120v from the house batteries, a simple may to lessen the cords running all over, items such as coffee maker, toaster can be used on this counter were as and other 120v item that plugs into the six unit can also be moved simply by moving the plug!
 

dar395

Adventurer
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Here the house batteries are being prepared to be installed, somethings never seem to progress correctly in these builds. As I was trying to get the battery in the frame box I found the post was to high for the box cover that can be seen in the background. I found on the internet that you are able to cut the post off without damage to the battery! and I did as the photo shows. :bigbossHL:

One of the moments when you do the deed and it hits ya, Christ sakes just turn the battery around!:yikes:

It all worked out with no loss outside of time.

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Just some photos showing the prep for install, covering the post and wire ends to make sure no sparks flew, the mounting was done by using the floor jack, On the boxes you are able to see the safety wires that are mounted to the frame also, these seem to enable the removal of a box/battery and would also be a safe guard in case of broken box mount bolts. I used gage #2 for the unison of the batteries an #1 from the batteries to the convertor for power transfer.

Frame mounted inwards just behind the side door step using factory mount holes for both the safety cables and boxes.
 

dar395

Adventurer
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In places where someone could come in contact with a screw point I've used small plastic anchors as guards thru-out the build.
 

luthj

Engineer In Residence
Some battery constructions are damaged by cutting the post in that manner. The threaded stud can be connected to the battery proper in the upper part of the post. (You can see two separate rings in the post cross section). If this is the case the battery will not work properly under load. I would suggest testing them with a decent sized load before getting too far along...
 

dar395

Adventurer
Some battery constructions are damaged by cutting the post in that manner. The threaded stud can be connected to the battery proper in the upper part of the post. (You can see two separate rings in the post cross section). If this is the case the battery will not work properly under load. I would suggest testing them with a decent sized load before getting too far along...
I tested it and all seems to work correctly, just one of the lessons of the build.
 

EWizard

New member
is the refrigerator going to run off of an inverter, or are you only going to be using it when staying at a place with hookups?
 

dar395

Adventurer
is the refrigerator going to run off of an inverter, or are you only going to be using it when staying at a place with hookups?
It is abled to be ran off either 120v shore power or the inverter, I have tried to super insulate to control cooling lost. This idea came from Len over on the Sports mobile forums as a self build. Our old van had one close to this same unit but I had done that unit in 1" pink foam as Len did, this one I've done it mostly in closed cell in hopes to be able to run it for about 6 days on batteries.

I just came back from a trip an ran into another van traveler from Van Dowellers and he had modified a cube unit to lay on it's back his name was Dan Cord and he has it outlined on his site www.dancordray.com
 

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