frontier diesel

jgallo1

Adventurer
Hello Nissan forum,
I have been an active member on the expo forum for some time. I have never ventured over to the Nissan section. I have alway been a toyota guy ( alittle detour with a Ram). In the past few years I have been wanting something different.
I have been doing some research and it seems that Nissan actually made an early model of the frontier with a diesel engine in the States. I can not find any info on them.
Does anybody know if this information is true. There is some talk of Nissan making a new frontier diesel, is this true or just typical speculation.
Thanks
 

jgallo1

Adventurer
this is from wiki on the frontier

North America[edit]
In North America, it was built in Tennessee from 1997 to 2000 as the Nissan Frontier. Versions: Single cab, King Cab, Crew Cab (Introduced in 1999). Engines: Petrol (KA24DE) and Diesel (TD27) (2wd and 4wd) with 5 speed manual transmission. These models were also exported to Central and South America. US production in Tennessee started in 1997 with a Single cab and a King cab. A four-door version of the D22 was designed and developed during 1997–1998, being first produced in April 1999 and launched in May 1999 in the US as the 2000 Frontier Crew Cab.[12][13][14]

In 1999, a special edition was offered. Nissan called it the Desert Runner. It had a king cab base but on the 4X4 frame which gave it a boost in ride height, bigger tires and a 4- or 5-speed 2WD drivetrain. For 2001 the Desert Runner got a new look and a supercharged version of the V6 engine.

In 2005 the V6 VQ40DE was added. Standard on all Crew Cabs through current 2018.
 

leeleatherwood

Active member
Diesel Frontier will NEVER happen in America.

The emissions requirements make them far too expensive and unreliable with nearly 0 customer base. Some people, especially in the U.S want things they can't have even though they are clearly inferior, they still want it because they can't have it. Good examples of this are RHD vehicles, diesel engines, Toyota Hilux, etc.

Diesel engines are standard in other countries such as South Africa and Australia because they have shitty Gasoline (petrol), not because diesel is better.

Nissan has already stopped offering the Patrol with a diesel engine, (and the Australians love the Petrol engine) the Navara will follow suit too.
 

plh

Explorer
Some people, especially in the U.S want things they can't have even though they are clearly inferior, they still want it because they can't have it. Good examples of this are RHD vehicles, diesel engines, Toyota Hilux, etc.
The majority likes the flexy comfort that doesn't come in 3rd world ruggedness. The oxymoron to this is the 4Runner which is based on the LC Prado and is selling pretty well.
 
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toylandcruiser

Expedition Leader
Diesel Frontier will NEVER happen in America.

The emissions requirements make them far too expensive and unreliable with nearly 0 customer base. Some people, especially in the U.S want things they can't have even though they are clearly inferior, they still want it because they can't have it. Good examples of this are RHD vehicles, diesel engines, Toyota Hilux, etc.

Diesel engines are standard in other countries such as South Africa and Australia because they have shitty Gasoline (petrol), not because diesel is better.

Nissan has already stopped offering the Patrol with a diesel engine, (and the Australians love the Petrol engine) the Navara will follow suit too.
Australia doesn’t have shitty gas. I’ve been there. I saw plenty of gas powered trucks and cars.
 

jgallo1

Adventurer
Diesel Frontier will NEVER happen in America.

The emissions requirements make them far too expensive and unreliable with nearly 0 customer base. Some people, especially in the U.S want things they can't have even though they are clearly inferior, they still want it because they can't have it. Good examples of this are RHD vehicles, diesel engines, Toyota Hilux, etc.

Diesel engines are standard in other countries such as South Africa and Australia because they have shitty Gasoline (petrol), not because diesel is better.

Nissan has already stopped offering the Patrol with a diesel engine, (and the Australians love the Petrol engine) the Navara will follow suit too.

I agree the usa emissions requirements make the market for diesel's in the states very tough, it also keeps the car turnover high. I have a few friends who work in the auto industry. We here in the states buy and lease new cars more than any other country. The auto industry does not build modern vehicles to last for the usa, that comes from a good friend who works as head of global development for one of the auto companies.

The research that I pasted into the forum was in reference to older frontiers. It says that they used to make them in diesel. I have never seen one, (that does not mean much) that is what I was asking about.

I also agree that alot of Americans want what they can not have, the "cool factor of a small diesel" is the main driver for alot of these conversations.

I have not always lived in the USA. It is my personal feeling that a diesel engine just have a longer life span, can be worked harder, and will usually get better mpg's , finally usually have better low end torque.

I do think some thing about this whole topic has always been alittle off. We have no problem offering massive trucks with diesel's. I get the they are better for towing. I come from a ranching family.
Why not make mid-size diesels? I have heard of the "chicken tax" is that really the reason? Is it just numbers?
 

docwatson

Adventurer
@jgallo1 I think it has to do with fuel adoption. Gas was just more popular in the US for years so consumers got use to it. I've heard keeping up diesel with the EPA requirements is tougher than with gas but I don't know that to be true. The chicken tax has to do with mid-size trucks/vans in general not necessarily diesel.

My guess is that all the D22 diesel Frontiers were exported. Nissan did have a Frontier Cummins concept a few years ago but I am not holding my breath for that to become reality.
 

leeleatherwood

Active member
Australia doesn’t have shitty gas. I’ve been there. I saw plenty of gas powered trucks and cars.
The availability of quality gasoline (at a reasonable price) has historicaly not been good in remote areas. It's better now which is why petrol trucks are becoming more common. They still have a stigma about it though so you will still see many people in Australia dismissing gasoline engines for overland/expedition type use.
 
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leeleatherwood

Active member
I think turbocharged direct injection gasoline engines can beat diesel in every category, even durability. Normally diesel engines are super reliable because they are built super strong by design. Cast iron blocks, heads, forged pistons, etc.

You can build a Gasoline engine the same way, the drawback is weight and performance. So most gasoline engines sacrafice long term durability for those reasons. But, we can name a ton of gasoline engines that are very durable from history like the AMC inline 6.

I think the future though like I said is turbocharged gasoline, they can meet and exceed every diesel metric. Look at the Ford EcoBoosts for example.
 

jgallo1

Adventurer
I have been wondering about the new turbocharged direct injections engines. The old stigma w/ turbocharged engines, was the turbo going out and costing a fortune. It happened in my moms old volvo when I was I kid. I remember my dad grumbling about . ha ha

I think ford put a turbocharged direct injection in the new ranger. It will be interesting to see how the ranger does. I have heard quite a few complaints about the new Chevy Colorado. I had a new taco and sold it 6 months and went back to 1st gen taco.

I do drive quite a bit, and think that something more modern would be alittle nicer. Nothing immediate but maybe in the next year or so. This why I am looking at the frontier.
 

chet6.7

Explorer
I agree the usa emissions requirements make the market for diesel's in the states very tough, it also keeps the car turnover high. I have a few friends who work in the auto industry. We here in the states buy and lease new cars more than any other country. The auto industry does not build modern vehicles to last for the usa, that comes from a good friend who works as head of global development for one of the auto companies.

The research that I pasted into the forum was in reference to older frontiers. It says that they used to make them in diesel. I have never seen one, (that does not mean much) that is what I was asking about.

I also agree that alot of Americans want what they can not have, the "cool factor of a small diesel" is the main driver for alot of these conversations.

I have not always lived in the USA. It is my personal feeling that a diesel engine just have a longer life span, can be worked harder, and will usually get better mpg's , finally usually have better low end torque.

I do think some thing about this whole topic has always been alittle off. We have no problem offering massive trucks with diesel's. I get the they are better for towing. I come from a ranching family.
Why not make mid-size diesels? I have heard of the "chicken tax" is that really the reason? Is it just numbers?
Nissan did make mid size,or what I would call a mid size, diesel using the 5.0 Cummins with an Aisin transmission in the Titan XD.I think this is the last year of production.
 

plh

Explorer
Nissan did make mid size,or what I would call a mid size, diesel using the 5.0 Cummins with an Aisin transmission in the Titan XD.I think this is the last year of production.
Didn't sell well enough to keep around in the lineup & $5k price addition
 
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docwatson

Adventurer
The Titan XD was explicitly marketed as between a half ton and three quarter truck. I would hardly compare the Titan XD to a D22 or D40.
 
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