Gday, Newbie checking in.

#1
Hi
I am new to this forum and looking at building an Expedition Truck.

I have done a bit of travelling on my BMW 1200 GSA and Toyota FJ cruiser.

I want to build something I can live in off-grid and travel this great nation of ours.

The dilemma I am having is choosing a rig.

Option 1, 79 series Landcruiser with chassis extension and a living module built in Aluminum
Option 2, Iveco daily single cab with similar module as above/
Option 3, Fuso Canter FG 4x4 with a 4.5 mtr livin module
Option 4, Isuzu NPS as above living module

I have been told to stay clear of the Fuso as the drive train is a weak link especially running super singles.

Anyway hope to get lots of ideas and views.

Mike
 

Bris31

Adventurer
#4
........... I have been told to stay clear of the Fuso as the drive train is a weak link especially running super singles.
Hmmmm..... I have to be careful then. Anyway I am driving a 2003 FG649 and still no issue with drive link (in fact never heard of it). Without doubting what you heard, see below link and you will find few people who have Mitsubishi canter driven past many countries and continents. They can tell their first hand experience.

http://forum.expeditionportal.com/forums/72-Japanese-Heavy-Truck-Mitsubishi-and-Isuzu

Cheers.
 

whatcharterboat

Supporting Sponsor, Overland Certified OC0018
#5
Mike,

Contact Andrew Amesz ("Amesz" here on the forum). He's based in Perth and is a wealth of info on regarding expedition trucks having grown up in this industry. I knew both his dad and grandfather. Great guys and West Australian pioneers in the conversion of 4wd trucks to motorhomes.

He will give you good un-biased advice on anything you want to know.

Welcome to the forum.
Regards
John
 

redthies

Renaissance Redneck
#6
I have been told to stay clear of the Fuso as the drive train is a weak link especially running super singles.
Hi Mike, welcome to ExPo. I'm a Land Cruiser fan (have owned multiple 40s, 60s, an 80 and currently have a 100) and I think what you choose should depend on what sort of places you want to visit. While I've never personally driven the Telegraph track, I wonder how a Canter or Fuso would do in some of the tighter sections?

I quoted your Fuso rumour as I can assure you, we have been beating the crap out of our company FG for many many years. It gets driven by different people every day (mostly 22-28 year old males) and tows 10m long trailers with around 4000 kg on them as well as 800 kg of cargo and 500 litres of extra fuel on the tray. In the same time period (2008-present), we have also run Dodge 3500 and 5500 diesel trucks. The 3500 is dead and gone, and went through 8 clutches and heaps of other repairs including major things that kept it off the road for a month or more. In that same period, the FG had a single leaf spring crack in one of the rear packs. That's it.

As I said before, I think it comes down to your intended use. If you plan on lots of beach work, and steep and deep creeks etc, the LC might be the go. If wide open spaces of the outback are calling, then the extra cargo capacity and size of the FG or Canter may be a better bet. You'll certainly be able to carry a lot more food, beer and water on the bigger rig.
 
#7
Hi Mike, I think what you choose should depend on what sort of places you want to visit. While I've never personally driven the Telegraph track, I wonder how a Canter or Fuso would do in some of the tighter sections?

I quoted your Fuso rumour as I can assure you, we have been beating the crap out of our company FG for many many years. It gets driven by different people every day (mostly 22-28 year old males) and tows 10m long trailers with around 4000 kg on them as well as 800 kg of cargo and 500 litres of extra fuel on the tray.

As I said before, I think it comes down to your intended use. If you plan on lots of beach work, and steep and deep creeks etc, the LC might be the go. If wide open spaces of the outback are calling, then the extra cargo capacity and size of the FG or Canter may be a better bet. You'll certainly be able to carry a lot more food, beer and water on the bigger rig.
Let me tell you that generally if a Landcruiser can get through than I can get my Canter through. Take a look at my trip reports of our trips to the Top.

In sand, on steep climbs and deep creek crossings the Canter is at home. All it takes is a bit of reading and this would have been found out. Yes we do carry our load easier and as far as weight goes we have found that we are not overloaded (generally) where as other vehicles we travel with are over loaded. This has been proven over the weigh bridge.

Never had a drive line problem and can't see why we should. In fact I not long ago had new gears developed for the transfer case to increase our roadability. We now run the engine at 2500Rpm instead of 3000Rpm at 100Kph. This has given us an improved fuel economy in the range of 2/3 Litres/100Klm. Also gained a slightly lower ratio Low Range in the process.

Dan.
 

redthies

Renaissance Redneck
#8
Let me tell you that generally if a Landcruiser can get through than I can get my Canter through. Take a look at my trip reports of our trips to the Top.

In sand, on steep climbs and deep creek crossings the Canter is at home. All it takes is a bit of reading and this would have been found out. Yes we do carry our load easier and as far as weight goes we have found that we are not overloaded (generally) where as other vehicles we travel with are over loaded. This has been proven over the weigh bridge.

Never had a drive line problem and can't see why we should. In fact I not long ago had new gears developed for the transfer case to increase our roadability. We now run the engine at 2500Rpm instead of 3000Rpm at 100Kph. This has given us an improved fuel economy in the range of 2/3 Litres/100Klm. Also gained a slightly lower ratio Low Range in the process.

Dan.

Well gosh Dan, thanks for what sounds a bit like a reprimand for not having read your trip reports!? All it would have taken YOU is a bit of reading to realize I wasn't saying negative things about your beloved Canter, or the Fuso I drive. I was merely pointing out that those types of vehicles are designed for a different purpose than a Land Cruiser, and that perhaps one should take in to account ones intended use before buying. I'm sure your Canter is very capable. Maybe post a link to your trip reports as I'm sure more than a few of us would love to read them.
 
#9
Thank you for all the advice and certainly will take on board all the comments relating to the Canter.

Now I have started to look at choices I see pros and cons with them all.

One question that has come up is how do I calculate the biggest body I can fit to a truck i.e the amount of overhang I can do with modifying the original truck chassis.

I read somewhere it is calculation based on wheelbase and an offset from the rear axle, also i think you have to factor in the overhang from the chassis rails and the subframe?

I am planning on living in this truck for a few years while I travel around Australia so I would like to get as many cubic meters in the camper box as possible.

Being familiar with Autocad I can draw up the plans once I know what dimensions I have to work with. I was thinking if I went Isuzu NPS300 then a body size of 4600 x 2200 x 2000 (possibly pop top).

Panels.JPG
 

redthies

Renaissance Redneck
#10
Well, given the whole living out of it for two years, I'd definitely go with a FG or similar. The thread below has heaps of examples of what others have done. A bloke I know has done a caravan on the back of his with super single wheels and 35" tyres. It's a beast! Not exactly "fast" on highways, but he travels very long distances with it.

http://forum.expeditionportal.com/threads/9299-Mitsu-Fuso-Camper-examples


Here is the one I've mentioned above. It looks quite tall, and I agree that a pop top is a better choice. This one sees a lot colder weather than yours will.


Given the appropriate budget, I'd just be calling these guys... http://earthcruiser.com
 
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