GXV Patagonia on the Kenworth K370 chassis

Keyne

Adventurer
#3
I wonder if there is 4x4. The website doesn't say that it is. Maybe they are building on 4x2 chassis now?

Update, guy on Facebook is building the second one of these and he mentioned this is the US version of the DAF truck and they do convert to AWD... not sure if he frequents Expo but I asked him some questions about the conversion and will report back.
 
#4
Not sure if you are referring to me as the person on Facebook or not but we are getting the a Kenworth Patagonia built at GXV, I believe it is the 3rd Kenworth they will have built. The Kenworth is delivered to GXV and then converted to 4x4 before the installation of the cabin on the chassis.
 
#6
Are they also going to convert the engine to remove the emissions standards requiring ULSD and def so you can drive it outside the US? I'm sorry but what good is a massive expedition truck that you can only use in the US and northern Baja?
 
#7
I believe there is an option for world travelers to order the truck without the emissions controls that require ULSD fuel. We only plan to travel in the US and Canada so we did not consider that option. Give GXV a call to get more info.
 
#8
I believe there is an option for world travelers to order the truck without the emissions controls that require ULSD fuel. We only plan to travel in the US and Canada so we did not consider that option. Give GXV a call to get more info.
Not if they are registering the vehicle in the US. Somebody prove me wrong.
 
#10
Are they also going to convert the engine to remove the emissions standards requiring ULSD and def so you can drive it outside the US? I'm sorry but what good is a massive expedition truck that you can only use in the US and northern Baja?
It wouldn't be to GXV's best interest if they removed the emission hardware.

What's needed is a DPF that's serviceable.

On later diesel engines it's important that the engine oil meets low ash specification API CJ-4.
 
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#11
It wouldn't be to GXV's best interest if they removed the emission hardware.

What's needed is a DPF that's serviceable.

On later diesel engines it's important that the engine oil meets low ash specification CJ-4.
I was actually being facetious. GVX is not allowed to tamper with emissions on a new US based vehicle.
 
#12
With one complete and three in the pipeline, looks like GXV already has a grip on what's in their best interest. I know we are going to give it a hard look.

A couple feet longer than most FUSO based rigs but with double the HP, Improved Torque and similar turning radius.

Plus it has a chance of making it up white bird hill without putting your flashers on and overheating.

Lots to like.
 
#13
They look like awesome rigs. It's the rig price, when one starts jumping continents, one has to be prepared to walk away from their vehicle, both physically and financially.

The emission equipment issue doesn't bother me, people are traveling the world with later model diesels without their emissions hardware removed. When someone reports via social media that they are stuck with emission related issues, the hundreds if not thousands who see the post spread the word. Now hundreds if not thousands are reported to be having emission related problems due to higher diesel fuel sulfur levels. It would be nice if the sulfur levels were at least consistent. The numbers range from 15ppm, 50ppm, 300ppm, 500ppm, 2000ppm and 5000ppm.

Its worth repeating, on later model diesels with a DPF its important to use an engine oil that meets low ash content specification API CJ-4.
 
#14
I wonder how many people actually take these from the US overseas. For instance, over 100 Earthroamers have been built, and I wonder how many have been overseas (I do know of the one famous one of course). Several have been to Mexico but I wonder how much many went very far south. Anyway, this type of vehicle is still very appealing to many that plan to stay in North America and there is a ton to see and do here. Given the price I would think people considering this type of vehicle could buy one here, use it for many years and then sell it to buy a similar (or smaller rig) for other countries. I for one would love to go through the US in one of these and then sell it to buy a Sprinter based van for continental Europe and then maybe something entirely different for Australia. Those three trips alone could take a long long time.
 
#15
We are in our 11th month overlanding through Mexico and Central America. We have met all kinds of overlanders from all over the world. All (of course) had pre-emissions standards rigs if they were diesel. Not only can you not take a modern diesel vehicle outside the US or Europe, nobody in their right mind would try. If you can't fix all the problems you must have a rig that can be fixed by a local mechanic. No dealerships around to diagnose with their custom computers. Also, you can't easily source def down south. I wouldn't even buy a modern diesel rig to use in the US or Europe because I don't want to have to limp to the dealership every time the check engine light comes on.