I know how he feels . What a nightmare

#16
Slowly lifting one side until it tips is completely different to one side of your trick falling away quickly. The sudden momentum has a massive effect.

Neil
 

Buliwyf

Viking with a Hammer
#18
Yeah, being angled over hard, and then the earth gives way and you slide, then a sudden stop......over you go. LOLz. Fun in the sun.

It might be wise to incorporate some sort of eyelet and bar on the center roof of the truck to tip it upright with.

I'd love a chance to try uprighting one with just a highlift jack, chainsaw, shovel, and 120' of chain. We used to move entire barns around with just logs and leverage. Like stonehenge or the pyramids.
 
#19
No definite numbers for my vehicle but I do know that increasing track by 7.77% with 90mm offset Hutchinson wheels probably increased the tipover angle by about 3 degrees
 
#20
I'd love a chance to try uprighting one with just a highlift jack, chainsaw, shovel, and 120' of chain. We used to move entire barns around with just logs and leverage. Like stonehenge or the pyramids.
Where did you move Stonehenge? I was going to take my kids... : )
 
#21
Unicat does tilt testing. Dunno the numbers. Maybe Charlie can tell us his.



Doug Hackney got into the subject pretty well with his build.

http://www.hackneys.com/mitsu/index-CG.htm

Someone else around here did something...can't recall who...maybe Iain_U1250?

Funny that you posted this picture. I looked at this one every day when I was working for them :) It really comes down to center of gravity. All heavy parts are as low as possible to the ground. I followed the same principle with our camper. Even though it looks top heavy, it's mostly just empty space.
 

dwh

Tail-End Charlie
#22
Funny that you posted this picture. I looked at this one every day when I was working for them :) It really comes down to center of gravity. All heavy parts are as low as possible to the ground. I followed the same principle with our camper. Even though it looks top heavy, it's mostly just empty space.
So how many degrees does a Unicat tilt? I seem to rember 33 or 35...something like that.
 
#25
Our Saurer is a massive beast, 27 feet long, 28,000 pounds, 12 feet high. Our cabin is strong, 2" aluminum wall studs and crossmembers, and can be lifted off the truck with hoist points on all eight corners. However, on a rollover, I doubt using those would keep the structural integrity intact, even though the box is bolted to the frame on all four corners. The aluminum frame is the base for the cabin/box and is attached to the steel truck frame. Don't see how one could attach D-rings to either. I guess avoiding a rollover situation would be the best bet. Plus, my wife wouldn't allow to do so anyways! Guess that is the plan.
 
#26
Considering the weight of truck chassis, engine, axles etc I wouldn't think a bit of extra headroom in a camper while still keeping heavy stuff low down would make a noticeable difference?
When we had our Mog I gave way to a towed vehicle coming the other way on a gravel road during heavy rain. The gravel was the top layer of a smallish embankment that may have been 3'-4' high built up over some soft ground. As we slowly pulled to a stop at the side of that raised road I could feel the front near side wheel start to disappear down the slope as the road side gave way, so put it in reverse since three wheels were still on what should have been ok ground. But the back near side started going too. So rather than hope we could slide sideways, drop that 3'-4' and stay upright I drove forwards and turned down onto the soft stuff. We stayed upright but were then stuck for a few hours until low tyre pressures and some digging got us back up that small, soft steep embankment.
A local articulated truck stopped to offer help and tow if needed, while he was watching me trying not to roll driving out again he said to my wife no-way would he pull over to the side of a road like that. Stay in the centre, if you have to give way to something bigger then back up and stay central until the road widens. The soft edges look ok and may well be for lighter stuff but not if you're a bit heavy.
We were lucky I think, but I won't be so quick to give way in the future!
 
#28
Grizzlyj did the right thing. If not faced with a cliff (>35-40 deg) it’s best to go off it pointing up/down the slope. Even if worse. Low tire pressure, low gears and diff locks usually work.
As long as the tires are on the ground.
 
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Sitec

Adventurer
#29
He probably did, but it takes guts and quick reactions to lock the steering to the left (or right) and plant it! In Neil's situation, looking at the pics, letting a soft roll occur parallel to the road was prob the best decision, and achieved the least amount of damage. Hard call to make in any situation.
 
#30
I would like at this point to say I did a quick dynamic risk assesment and chose the right course of action.

However, i cant .

By the time I had shouted WTF it was over.

2 seconds maximum.

I was lucky.

Neil
 
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