Icom id-4100a dual band ham radio

#16
I would use repeater book.com to search for D-STAR and Yaesu Fusion repeaters in your area. In my are there were around 15 Fusion repeaters in areas I typically travel. There was only 1 D-STAR repeater. So, my I would go Fusion if buying a new dual band rig. I have a Fusion HT I'm still trying to learn.
If this is your first radio and you don't know what all you want to get into I would start with the Icom 2730. It should do everything you might want except for digital.
 
#17
I didn't even see a Fusion repeater here when I checked yesterday, but, I wasn't really looking for one either. There is a few D-STAR repeaters listed. The techno junkie in me really likes bells and whistles, so I am having a difficult time deciding. I have been studying on these radios, so I'm learning about them and some of the features. I'm still leaning toward the 2730. I would like to maybe set up a base with D-STAR, I can see digital being a lot more fun at home than when distracted in a mobile rig.
 
#19
My personal opinion, based on the experience of having purchased an FTM-400DR for big bucks, is that if you are looking for something used for trail communications, don't bother with digital modes.

It could just be the Northern Virginia, Maryland, DC, and SE PA or SW NJ area, but I have had two C4FM digital QSOs in the two years I've had my 2m radio. Neither were on the trail. In fact, I would gladly give up my C4FM capability for $200 or $300 in my pocket.

I spent a lot of time angsting over which digital mode radio to choose, but two years after making the purchase, I realized it was a waste of time to even worry about digital modes. Nobody you will ever talk to on the trail is going to sit there waiting for a digital mode QSO to break through.

What I have found useful are the built-in APRS capability of the radio and simultaneous dual receivers.

My summary: Digital voice modes are interesting for hams who got their license to be a ham. Digital voice modes are almost totally useless for trail comms because, statistically speaking, there are very few people running those radios, and those that are running those radios are typically old dudes sitting in their backyard or basement, not in an off-road vehicle.

HAM Radio, as you will quickly find, makes you realize how useless your 2m/70m gear is when there's nobody to talk to. If all your trail buddies are running DSTAR, then buy a DSTAR radio. If all your trail buddies are running C4FM, buy a Yaesu. If all your buddies are grabbing Baofengs and you want to just have 2m/70cm capability for the odd case where you have people with HAM licenses in your group, go with an analog radio.

IIRC the ID-4100A is not a true simultaneous dual-receiver like the Kenwood V71A, ID-5100, or FTM-400DR. It can be programmed to switch between frequencies, but can't listen to two freqs at the same time. Not sure if that matters to you.
 
Last edited:

snare

Adventurer
#20
I went with an Icom 2730 and then built a separate dedicated APRS mobile with TNC/modem that bluetooths to a tablet or phone running aprsdroid. This way I dont lose one whole receiver on my 2730 dual band to APRS, and I can remove the TNC/Modem and attach it to an HT and even use it on foot, if need be.
 

Comanche Scott

Expedition Leader
#21
I went with an Icom 2730 and then built a separate dedicated APRS mobile with TNC/modem that bluetooths to a tablet or phone running aprsdroid. This way I dont lose one whole receiver on my 2730 dual band to APRS, and I can remove the TNC/Modem and attach it to an HT and even use it on foot, if need be.
That's a very cool idea! :beer:
 
#23
I only know a few guys with ham setups, and, I don’t know them well enough to ask them about what they use. I really only want a radio for safety sake. My wife and I do a lot of traveling alone, and the added comfort of ham is what I’m mostly after. I drive for a living, I deliver equipment to remote areas in the mountains. My new truck is getting a cheap dual band also. I’m leaning heavily towards the 2730 now. But the Kenwood v71 is an option also.
 
#24
Fwiw here i run a 5100a.

DR mode. When you set up the rig get the file from DStarinfo.org. Load it into the radio with the free software and an SD card. Enjoy. Seriously you can load tons of repeaters in. I time flat. Easy to edit in excel.

You don’t need to run DStar ever. You get a really solid radio that is quite durable. It’s no batwings but it’s a radio you can grow into.

Pro tip: go into DR mode then scan all repeaters. Not only will you scan FM and DStar repeaters but as you drive it adjusts which repeaters to scan based on location. I often drive 120 miles to the in-laws with 1 VFO to talk on and one scanning away.

The 4100 has the DR mode as well and can be loaded with software the same way. It has a smaller footprint.

What DR mode won’t do is tell you the most popular repeaters, just the ones nearby.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
#26
I surprised myself tonight and ordered a ID-5100 from Gigaparts. I’m kinda frugal, so placing the order was a bit trying. I popped for the Bluetooth and a Larsen antenna also. Can’t wait to install it!
 
Top