I'm winch dumb, can you help me?

FrenchieXJ

Expedition Leader
I believe the best information given out and I will repeat it. Get to a certified I4WDTA instructor and class. Do this before you spend any money on parts (some that you may not need).

If you have any questions you can drop me a PM conservation.

In full disclosure I am a retired I4WDTA educator. The only horse I have in the race is, I do not want to see anyone get hurt or waste money.

Da Frenchman
 

Vinman

Observer
Warn’s Platinum winch is completely wireless, power in, power out and operate the clutch all from the remote. All you’ll need is somebody to pull the rope and connect it.
You can disengage and re-engage the clutch directly from the remote and obviously power in and out.
 

mantree91

Member
I would rather go with a wireless renote controle than an incab only.

When you rearange your lime after a weird pull, it is way easier to be outside and see what is happening with the line on the drum than one being outside and guiding the cable and signaling in and out, specially when they do not really know what they are doing.

A wireless remote controle allow you to play with the winch while in and out of the vehicule. But always away from a loaded cable.
Toy can run both that's what I will be doing.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

LandCruiserPhil

Expedition Leader
Because of your self noted lack of experience learning to drive off road will pay off much more than a winch. Knowing and understanding the terrain and your vehicle will limit the need for a winch and provide a higher comfort level in your travels. Just because you have a winch does not mean you are covered. I have been in situations where a winch has been worthless. One tip to off-road by if you can't walk it chances are you can't drive it.
 

Nonimouse

Cynical old bastard
Couple of minor points to clarify

Synthetic rope doesn't just spool on the floor when it snaps - it fires back with enough force to injure. It's lighter and easier than wire though

You don't use synthetic rope with a Roller fairlead, if you do it gets caught in the corners on off angle pulls and snaps. You always use a Hawse fairlead

You can't power out synthetic rope with a winch using an 'in drum' braking system. It will melt the first wrap

I would suggest a TDS 12000 from Goodwinch. External brake, air free spool capable, Very, very reliable. If you can find one, a Superwinch X9 is all about reliability, but doesn't have an external brake. Both are easy to service, strong pullers, not overly quick...

As a point of view. A close friend is wheel chair bound - damn fool survived two IED'sand left his legs in the 'Ghan. He drives a 300Tdi 110 Auto with a TDS 12000. He has no issues (with the winch)
 

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MOguy

Explorer
You don't use synthetic rope with a Roller fairlead, if you do it gets caught in the corners on off angle pulls and snaps. You always use a Hawse fairlead
I always knew this but really never though about why. My question is doesn't the friction created by the Hawse fairlead cause heat and possible damage to the line?
 

Metcalf

Expedition Leader
You don't use synthetic rope with a Roller fairlead, if you do it gets caught in the corners on off angle pulls and snaps. You always use a Hawse fairlead
You can use a roller flairlead with synthetic line, there is just more risk that it can go slack and get caught over or under the bracket supporting the side rollers.
Typically, it isn't a huge issue for most people. It is very important that the rollers be as smooth as possible.
 

Metcalf

Expedition Leader
I always knew this but really never though about why. My question is doesn't the friction created by the Hawse fairlead cause heat and possible damage to the line?
Over time there will be a bit more wear with a hawse, but synthetic line itself is a very slippery 'bearing/bushing' surface.
I've never seen heat buildup in a hawse from a recovery operation.
The larger radius you can have hawse the better generally.

I have synthetic line that is 8+ years old used over an aluminum hawse for its entire life.
No issues to speak of.
 

DaveInDenver

Expedition Leader
You can use a roller flairlead with synthetic line, there is just more risk that it can go slack and get caught over or under the bracket supporting the side rollers.
Typically, it isn't a huge issue for most people. It is very important that the rollers be as smooth as possible.
I think that's the root of it, early on especially people didn't know not to re-use a fairlead that had already been used with steel rope without inspection. The same issue would exist with hawse fairleads if they had been run over with steel, too. Especially aluminum ones that would easily get slivers embedded. New or polished rollers would be fine. Personally I replaced mine with the Viking Delrin ones when I went to synthetic rope and haven't seen any evidence of damage or fraying on the rope fibers.

Under tension on a well designed fairlead it will be impossible for the rope to be forced into the corners. That's not necessarily true for all roller fairleads. Unhooked or slack, yup, if you don't spool the rope with at least some tension then it could fall into the gap. I don't think taking care of your gear and controlling it while spooling is an unrealistic expectation, though.
 

WOODY2

Adventurer
Hi all,

I have not done a ton of 4-wheeling, having spent most of my outdoor time in 2 wheels. I'm now, largely, limited to travelling offroad via my truck, but I use a wheelchair and need some assistance with winches and specific things to look for.

So, as I said, I use a wheelchair, and will largely be travelling offroad with other people. It might be my not-at-all vehicle savvy girlfriend, or it might be with friends on motorcycles, in jeeps, etc. I can envision a situation where I might need to winch out of something, but will be physically stuck in my truck (I can't get out except on relativity flat ground). I will also be doing all of the maintenance of any winch from my wheelchair.

Is there anything in particular I need to know about winches that might save me a headache down the road?
If I installed a bumper that largely enclosed the winch, will we absolutely need access to the clutch to make use of it?
Are there different types of controllers that I could operate 100% from inside of the truck? I've seen wireless and wired, but I don't know if there might be more to this aspect.
Would there be a particular type of winch that would be better suited for blind (on my part, inside of the truck) and dummy (my girlfriend.... i mean, she ain't no dummy, but this sort of stuff is not her forte) operation?

I literally don't know enough about winches to even know what to ask. I've only ever used a utility winch to pull a vehicle onto a trailer, and that was years ago.

Thanks for any insight, appreciate it!
I would strongly suggest you find a certified off road trainer and take a class that will provide competent hands on experience before you buy any winch. Not saying good recommendations haven't been made but hands on is better.
 
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