Info on standard IRLP and IRLP Reflector use.

crawler#976

Expedition Leader
#1
My personal policy is as follows:

I usually key up and say: "KE7IXX would like to access the IRPL node in appoximately 60 seconds. Is there any outstanding traffic on this repeater?"

I listen for the full minute, and if it's clear, say:

"This is KE7IXX controlling IRPL Node (XXXX) in (XXXXXXXX)" and while still transmitting type in the node number and then release the key.

After the node connects, pause and listen for traffic on the node freq. When clear, make your call.

Remember to pause before speaking - key up wait for one or two seconds before speaking to allow the connections to be made.

Also, wait for any squelch tails to drop before keying up after the last transmission.

When you've completed your call always thank the node owner for the useage before closing, even if you are part of the club that owns the node. While still transmitting type in 73, and release the key.

More info - excerts from:

http://www.narri.org/IRLP.html

IRLP OPERATING GUIDELINES

Listen to others use the IRLP to get the hang of it. Here is a few DO's and DON'Ts:

DO pause between transmissions to let other in or others to enter DTMF command.

DO hold your microphone PTT for one or more seconds before talking to allow all systems time to connect.

DO NOT try to make or break connections unless you are an authorized control operator.Those who control must identify themselves as controlling before sending DTMF command tones and return the node to the connection state you found it in, i.e., idle or connected to a node or reflector. Always ask if someone is using the connection before you change it.

DO NOT rag chew locally on a reflector or on a node connection. When the IRLP system is busy keep QSOs to 5 minutes or less.

DO pause for at least three to five seconds before talking after the node connects to a reflector to make sure you will not talk over a QSO in progress.
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Node-to-Node Connections

Direct one node-to-another node or one node-to-many via a connection to a Reflector. Direct connect Node-to-Node is just like it sounds where node "A" connects direct with node "B". In this mode the two nodes (repeaters) are interconnected and no other IRLP connections are possible. While "A" and "B" are connected, anyone attempting to connect with either node “A” or “B” will be told by a wave file recording that: "The node you are calling is currently connected to call sign or node number".

2) Node-to-Reflector Connections

The IRLP system has a hand full of servers called "reflectors" that allow for many nodes to connect together for nets, special activities or HF style QSOs. When a node is connected to a reflector it hears all the audio streams that are sent between the nodes that are connected to the reflector. Nodes will come and go freely to the reflectors, however, some node owners will leave their nodes connected to a reflector as a gateway for the local area.
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WESTERN REFLECTOR OPERATIONS POLICIES

These operating procedures are provided help assure your enjoyment of the Western Reflector. Please pause for three seconds before talking upon connecting to any Western Reflector channel to allow the audio streams to reach your node, and to make sure a QSO is not in progress, before you start talking. Pause between transmissions to allow others into QSOs and key up for a long second so others will have chance to hear all other. Quick keying is not the sign of a good reflector user.
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CURRENT USES OF THE W7AOR WESTERN REFLECTOR 925X CHANNELS 0 - 9

You are welcome on any of the Western Reflector channels. However, public service activities, or emergency traffic have priority over casual traffic on any channel. If a controlled net is in progress follow the direction of the net control station.

Channels 0 -9

Channel 0 (Main Channel) - 9250 Calling and QSOs

Channel 1 - 9251 Linking and QSOs

Channel 2 - 9252 Special Feeds - Listen Only

In the past NASA Audio Feed was active during Shuttle Missions and Space Station activities.


Channel 3 - 9253 Open QSO QSO and linking channel. California Activities and Emergency Services

Channel 4 - 9254 Hawaii–Pacific Rim Linking, Special Activities and Emergency Services.

Various nets and interconnections relating to the Hawaii-Pacific Rim are found on this channel. Guam conducts a wide area net on a weekly basis.

Channel 5 - 9255 Special Activities and QSO's.

High Altitude Arizona Balloon Launches Hear cross band repeaters activity via 9255. See Contact Jack W7JLC at Node 3182 or by e-mail jscra@cableone.net for more information. The webpages are: http://www.ansr.org and http://www.kd7lmo.net and the yahoo groups is http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Ballooning.

Channel 6 - 9256 Calling and QSO

Channel 7 - 9257 Calling and Nets.
This channel is used by American Red Cross, the Disaster Communicators Forum (DCF), and RACES organization residing outside Nevada (Nevada uses 9258 and *NV-GATE*.) The DCF and ARC uses 9257 and Echo link Conference Server *DCF-ARC* 336037 to link communicators together before, during, and after disasters. This is to augment local communications with communicators outside the effected areas.

In the past various individuals and Amateur Radio organizations have come forth to provide emergency response communications where it was needed. Those affected by a disaster deeply appreciate the dedication and effectiveness of ham radio operators. Recent disasters have reaffirmed the need for ham radio operators to augment governmental operations.

See http://groups.yahoo.com/group/DISASTER_COMMUNICATORS_FORUM/ This forum is for those who recognize the need to share information. including lessons learned, discuss preparedness planning and disaster relief coordination. It is intended that all organizations involved in preparedness and response, including, but not limited to ARC, ARES, RACES, FEMA, Sky warn, Salvation Army, ERC, and Homeland Security will participate in the Disaster Communicators Forum (DCF) for the betterment of the whole.

See http://groups.yahoo.com/group/VoIP_American_Red_Cross_Communicators_Net/ for net information and group communications.

Channel 8 - 9258 Calls and Nets

Ref 9258 (Channel 8) is linked to Echo link Conference Server NV-GATE (152566) and thus allows IRLP nodes on Channel 8 to talk to Echo link nodes on NV-GATE. The NV Section ARRL ARES-Skywarn uses this channel for nets.

Nevada ARES/Skywarn Net Every Wednesday at 7 PM Pacific Time. This net is for all parties interested in Skywarn activities. Other ARES business may follow Skywarn. All check-ins provide a weather report for practice and are able to check equipment.

Nevada State ARES/RACES Net Every Thrusday at 7 PM Pacific time. For the leasdership and all intersted parties.


Channel 9 - 9259 Reserved for ERC-ECS Nets. Not open for QSOs.
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pismo62

Adventurer
#4
A question for anyone who knows about reflector use.

If you conect to lets say 9250 and then decide you want to connect to 9251. Do you have to disconnect from the node and start again, or is there a way to re-key in the next channel?

Thanks in advance
 
#5
pismo62 said:
A question for anyone who knows about reflector use.

If you conect to lets say 9250 and then decide you want to connect to 9251. Do you have to disconnect from the node and start again, or is there a way to re-key in the next channel?

Thanks in advance
I have tryed to switch but it didn't work... So I think the answer is to disconnect and reconnect to the other node, Plus you will then be following the guidelines on how to use a node/reflector...
 

Ursidae69

Expedition Leader
#7
I am still planning on making the connection to the western reflectror via a repater on Sandia Crest in Abq and I have a newb question. If I get this to work and I get connected, I'm no longer broadcasting off the local repeater right, at least out where the local hams can hear?

If I am having a QSO about fridges or whatever from Sandia Crest through the reflector, is it being repated locally? If not, then once I'm in a node and no longer repeating out locally, then can the repeater still work for local traffic?

I'm having a hard time wording the questions because I'm confused about some of the details.

Thanks.
 

crawler#976

Expedition Leader
#8
Chuck, anyone that can hear your local repeater will be able to hear and participate in the conversation you link to via IRLP. The repeater works exactly as it did before, but is linked to another location via the internet.

That's why it's important to follow the procedure above:

First I listen for any traffic. Then, I make a call announcing that I'd like to access the IRPL node, and if there is any outstanding traffic.
This lets folks know you're going to be using the repeater for a period of time.

I usually key up and say: "KE7IXX would like to access the IRPL node in appoximately 60 seconds. Is there any outstanding traffic on this repeater?" I listen for the full minute, and if it's clear, proceed from there.

Even tho I'm a club member of the nodes/repeaters I use ($20.00 a year for three local groups is no big deal, right??? They have to pay for the equipment and internet access somehow... YARC just bought a Kenwood 2M 60W repeater for a little more than $1100.00 for our use - that's a lot of $20.00 dues.) I don't want to be an airwave hog, and being courteous is key to being able to use the equipment...

Mark
 

Ursidae69

Expedition Leader
#9
Thanks Mark,

I've always been the kid who didn't raise his hand in class. So, having my chat beamed halfway across NM is a mental hurdle for me. :oops: I do plan to try it out though at some point. From my house it is ~60 miles to the repater, I will probably have to wait for a trip to Abq to test this out.

Thanks.

Chuck...


crawler#976 said:
Chuck, anyone that can hear your local repeater will be able to hear and participate in the conversation you link to via IRLP. The repeater works exactly as it did before, but is linked to another location via the internet.

That's why it's important to follow the procedure above:



This lets folks know you're going to be using the repeater for a period of time.

I usually key up and say: "KE7IXX would like to access the IRPL node in appoximately 60 seconds. Is there any outstanding traffic on this repeater?" I listen for the full minute, and if it's clear, proceed from there.

Even tho I'm a club member of the nodes/repeaters I use ($20.00 a year for three local groups is no big deal, right??? They have to pay for the equipment and internet access somehow... YARC just bought a Kenwood 2M 60W repeater for a little more than $1100.00 for our use - that's a lot of $20.00 dues.) I don't want to be an airwave hog, and being courteous is key to being able to use the equipment...

Mark
 

1leglance

2007 Expedition Trophy Champion, Overland Certifie
#11
guy yes you have switched the repeater but if another ham comes along and hears silence they can key "73" then connect to some other node...
so it isn't as if you have total control and of course as always everything you say can be heard and responded to locally as usual.
The nice thing is that if there are a number of expo members in your area only 1 of them has to connect the node, the rest can just use it
 

Cabrito

I come in Peace
#12
A little confused

One of my local repeaters does Node 3057 - will this be connecting to the 9250 reflector? I can't seem to find a local SF Bay Area repeater that says it connects to the 9250 node. I think i might not be totally grasping the concept..

I want to try to connect to the 9pm net tonight from the W6PX Concord, ca repeater.
 
#13
Cabrito said:
One of my local repeaters does Node 3057 - will this be connecting to the 9250 reflector? I can't seem to find a local SF Bay Area repeater that says it connects to the 9250 node. I think i might not be totally grasping the concept..

I want to try to connect to the 9pm net tonight from the W6PX Concord, ca repeater.
3057 is the node I use to connect some times - it seems to be busy though as it is connected to a wide are repeter network (WINS).

here is a lost of local nodes you can use:
8730 K6KYA CA 444.8500 114.80 2.85
3115 KB9EWP CA 147.5700 114.8 8.39
3219 K6JSI CA 441.6500 100.0 11.36
8410 WB6TC CA 147.2100 100.00 13.54
3206 K6MFG CA 442.5250 88.5 19.23
7540 W6CBS CA 441.6125 100.0 20.49
8240 KR6WP CA 440.0750 114.80 21.58
3780 WR6HM CA 444.9000 91.50 22.45
3173 K6IB CA 434.3000 85.4 24.35

All of them can connect to 9250 - the western reflector. For status info for each node or more detail check out www.irlp.net go to node info and do a node search by zip code.

Hope this helps. I am still learning the in's and outs of IRLP. Let me know if you need any more info.
 
#15
Ursidae69 said:
Thanks Mark,

I've always been the kid who didn't raise his hand in class. So, having my chat beamed halfway across NM is a mental hurdle for me. :oops: I do plan to try it out though at some point. From my house it is ~60 miles to the repater, I will probably have to wait for a trip to Abq to test this out.

Thanks.

Chuck...
If you are using 100W VHF you should be able to make contact if you are in a higher area... I have connected several times from about that distance when on the trail.
 
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