Is there a better between seat storage?

mep1811

Gentleman Adventurer
I picked up this between the seat storage net.
The concept is great the execution not-so-great. The very wide weave of the net makes putting items into the net somewhat difficult and pulling stuff out as well.
Has anyone seen a similar product but with a finer mesh or a solid stretchy material.

Thanks
 

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Lucky j

Explorer
Just place a cotton reusable shopping bag inside tye net bag and you are done. Or cut the net and sew in cotton heavy cloth at it's place.
 

rayra

Expedition Leader
I'd probable sew up some sort of custom-fitting bag or pouch to fill that volume between the seats. Like a sack overall, but maybe a front flap with velcro that you could pull down for oft-used items.
 

jeegro

Adventurer
Seconded on the sewing. I always looked at fabric stuff as a consumer, but recently when I was interested in a webbing cargo net, companies want 200+, sometimes as much as 600 depending on size. Looking at the material cost, around $40, I decided to pick up a sewing machine and made my own cargo barrier out of 1.5" polyester seatbelt webbing. I put velcro strips on the front side, between the front seats. So now I can stick a velcro backed bag or pouch here and have quick access from driver or passenger seat. I haven't put anything there yet, but I'm thinking maps, documents, snack, etc. I installed some d-rings as well, in case I want to hang anything for access. I'm also planning on sewing on elastic loops for stuffing in jackets or clothing (on the back side)

Fair warning, there is a reason companies charge hundreds for these nets.. it's very tedious, time consuming work. But in no way is it difficult.. took me 10 minutes to learn how to use the sewing machine. Lot's of box-x stitches! My biggest tip is to use a plier-stapler to mock up the net, otherwise it's near impossible to keep together and straight

Sewing is akin to welding, once you pick it up, you'll start thinking of a million ways to use the skill to make stuff according to your needs

edit: here's a crappy photo of it
 

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BritKLR

Explorer
I'm enjoying this sewing conversation! I agree with the welding analogy, lmk if you have any questions about techniques, I've been chasing thread for about 25 years.

Wait till you get the real bug and upgrade to a monster Juki 1541s......this thing will take your fingers off if your not careful!

Btw, for the OP, some webbing, couple of side release buckles and some Cordura or material and you could produce a simple hanging pouch. Lmk if you have any questions.508232508233
 

rayra

Expedition Leader
I can recommend www.ripstopbytheroll.com - I've bought from them many times, service is always prompt and they have decent deals. I used them for the awning project(s) in my sig and several other similar projects, bags, telescope covers, replacement umbrellas etc. I'm using a low end 'starter' sewign machin with a plastic gear train. I've done a little 1" webbing wtih it, but I don't think it will survive the next couple projects when I sew such webbing as a perimeter reinforcement on my "final" awning design / project. At the very least I need a bunch of sharp needles and better thread and maybe a slower speed approach.
 

BritKLR

Explorer
For those interested in starting to sew, a couple of really good sources for used machines are your local garage sales, Craigslist and family members. Try to stay away from modern Walmart, mass produces machines due to their weak drive trains and throw away designs. Any older machines (50, 60, 70's) made by Singer, Brother, etc tend to have a solid steel frame and powerful motors. They tend to be similiar in design and share parts, such as motors, bobbins, bobbin cases, needles, presser foots, etc. Finding one with the a walking foot design and a reverse capability will make your life so much easier. Also, if you can find a consumer machine with the stand will give you a solid, dedicated place to keep everything and to sew on.
Now, probably the best machine is the Commercial or Industrial Walking Foot machines. These have powerful motors, heavy weight pulley wheels, dedicated sewing tables/stands, a walking presser foot that pulls the material under the needle versus you pushing the material through, lights, stronger frames and just built for the heavier and/or stacked materials you may use.
Cost: My first machine was free and given to me by a family friend. The second machine cost me $25.00 with the stand from a local garage sale. My first commercial walking foot machine was $500 with stand and my current Industrial machine with all the accessories was just under $2000.

Good luck!
 

alia176

Explorer
I picked up this between the seat storage net.
The concept is great the execution not-so-great. The very wide weave of the net makes putting items into the net somewhat difficult and pulling stuff out as well.
Has anyone seen a similar product but with a finer mesh or a solid stretchy material.

Thanks
Mike,

You carry too much ****, time to pear down and re-think some organizations when you get into a 200 series <flipoff> 😁
 
Does your seatbacks have a pocket in them? If so, maybe you can use a yard sign holder (h-shaped metal or similar) and on the top half make a spandex-type pocket for storage. Maybe a cardboard backer with a pouch front?

As with most travelers, you want to keep most items out of sight for opportunistic asshats.
 
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