I've asked this in the past but with new members and all, do any of you drive stock rigs?

#32
I have to say, perhaps I am reading into it, but there is something sort of challenging or defensive about your tone on this topic, it's just sort of a personal perspective that you judge others for not sharing. For example, why are you OK with a second battery, or winch but not with a roof rack, or tire carrier, or whatever else? Many people get by fine with a single battery and a jump box, a second battery is unnecessary (I have one btw). So is an aftermarket steel bumper, but I am OK with the expense, weight etc, as it prevents major damage occasionally. I definitely do not need it on most of my trips (although I would need somewhere to put a spare that wouldn't fit underneath), but if I had a stock rear bumper on my last wheeling trip, I probably would no longer have a stock bumper, as my aftermarket one took a beating on sharp descent/ascent ravines. I like the ability to self recover, I went out without it in the past, and have tow/kinetic ropes, but I'll accept the extra cost and weight for something that I will seldom use because I have security. I just like to not worry about things, i worry enough about body damage, it's nice to let the bumpers do their work. Same for the winch. Same for the roof rack. I guess i could put an OZtent on a stock rack, rather than a RTT, and sometimes I think about going that direction, but I like the convenience of the RTT a lot of the time.

I guess I'm saying is that if you want to say that the only way to go out is totally stock, because the Toyota engineers are smart dudes and know what you will need, that's fine, but as soon as you say some things are acceptable, for whatever your justification, then you have to accept other people have their own justifications as well. Yeah, some of these trucks are mall crawlers, but honestly I imagine that a lot of the people honestly hoped/thought that they would use them as they were intended more than they actually do.
You are reading way too much into it but you didn't comprehend much of what I was asking. It's OK, it's just the internet and this happens all the time. ;)
 
#33
I realize this is the LC forum so not quite as applicable here as the drive train has a longer life span, but I am blown away by the number of people on this site that sink a huge amount of money and accessories into high mileage vehicles. I think I see this a lot more in the van forum, but I would be terrified to cut into my vehicle to put an expensive bumper on when that vehicle is approaching 200K miles.

Anyway, I used my stock LC Prado to drive all over South Sudan and Uganda. It could have very much used a suspension upgrade however. Not because it needed more lift, but because the factory springs were too soft. I think most stock 4wd vehicles are way more capable than people realize.
 
#34
Since you're from Idaho this might be pertinent. I just got back from doing the ID BDR. And yes 90% of it could be done in a 2 wheel drive, although I'd be concerned in a big portion of that 95% even if it could have been done. Having said that, 1/2" of rain would have turned that 95% into maybe 40% and trying it a few weeks earlier would have made part of it impassable to 2 wheel drives. My truck was 100% stock except for comfort items such as my Decked drawer system, RTT, and ARB fridge (which you agreed were acceptable). I'm in the boat that all the hoopla stuff is unnecessary (although kind of cool looking) and people just need to get out BUT don't take a Cadillac Escalade on Black Gap Road in Big Bend. I had to rescue a Finnish couple that popped a rim and couldn't figure out how to change their tire. Could it have been done? Yes. Should it have been tried? Probably no.
 
#35
Since you're from Idaho this might be pertinent. I just got back from doing the ID BDR. And yes 90% of it could be done in a 2 wheel drive, although I'd be concerned in a big portion of that 95% even if it could have been done. Having said that, 1/2" of rain would have turned that 95% into maybe 40% and trying it a few weeks earlier would have made part of it impassable to 2 wheel drives. My truck was 100% stock except for comfort items such as my Decked drawer system, RTT, and ARB fridge (which you agreed were acceptable). I'm in the boat that all the hoopla stuff is unnecessary (although kind of cool looking) and people just need to get out BUT don't take a Cadillac Escalade on Black Gap Road in Big Bend. I had to rescue a Finnish couple that popped a rim and couldn't figure out how to change their tire. Could it have been done? Yes. Should it have been tried? Probably no.
My original post in this thread had more to do with the lifts to accommodate larger tires and rims, bumpers, snorkels, etc. and not mods like drawers, fridge, recovery gear, RTTs if that's one's preferred location to sleep. To my way of thinking, those are practical mods to use the vehicle for camping comfortably. To me, that's a world of difference and I wasn't thinking of those things when I started the thread.
 
#36
I have a 200-series and started out with a comfort/camping-focused build plus sliders and AT tires. While we don't shy away from shorter 1-2 night trips, most of our camping trips tend to be 3-5 days in the backcountry plus time to get there and back. One reason I went with the 200-series was the fact that it is so capable in it's stock form. We kept pushing the truck in terms of more remote and technical terrain. It doesn't take much for the 200 to demand a better suspension setup and most include some kind of lift more as a function of handling and weight management than anything else.

One challenge is that we started breaking stuff on more technical trails. What looked like minor scrapes to the plastic bumpers actually resulted in ripping off body molding panels, breaking taillights and headlights from the moving plastic, and irreparable dents to the stock skid plates. We also had some bad luck with tires over the years and these days carry two full-sized spares for super remote (or technical) trips plus a fair amount of tools (stuff to break and reseat the bead on a tire, repair a sidewall, etc.).

Fast forward to today and the 200 has front and rear bumpers, a winch, full skids, gears, and lockers. I recently moved to 34" tires for some additional clearance. It's easy for one thing to lead to another, but I will say I have much more peace of mind than I used to. The obvious downside is that the truck is obnoxiously heavy for longer backcountry trips. IMO, it's pretty much impossible to build out a 200 for both easy, comfortable backcountry travel (quick set up tent, plenty of water, fuel, gear, fridge, storage systems) and modest technical trails without totally eclipsing the GVWR (unless you have a trailer). You can get closer without a RTT, but I also have a Stealth which doesn't help in that department, heh.
 
#38
I drive a stock 200 for my daily driver. I did just get it though ;). I have a 100 that I've driven for the last 7 years. It started bone stock, but now has a 2.5" OME kit, UCA's, and 35's, etc.... This was all done little by little as I started getting stuck because of clearance issues hunting, or needed larger tires for the rocky trails I was running. I understand the fun/hobby aspect of building rigs as I also have a SOA FJ55 that is ridiculously huge, but personally I like building a rig as you find you are lacking in something. This tends to avoid overbuilding.
 
#39
I drive a stock 200 for my daily driver. I did just get it though ;). I have a 100 that I've driven for the last 7 years. It started bone stock, but now has a 2.5" OME kit, UCA's, and 35's, etc.... This was all done little by little as I started getting stuck because of clearance issues hunting, or needed larger tires for the rocky trails I was running. I understand the fun/hobby aspect of building rigs as I also have a SOA FJ55 that is ridiculously huge, but personally I like building a rig as you find you are lacking in something. This tends to avoid overbuilding.
Yep same thing I did with my Jeep LJ Rubicon. Nice and mild. Sorry just lurking on the LC forum in preparation for switching teams hahaha.. getting great info here.
 
#40
I drive a stock 200 for my daily driver. I did just get it though ;). I have a 100 that I've driven for the last 7 years. It started bone stock, but now has a 2.5" OME kit, UCA's, and 35's, etc.... This was all done little by little as I started getting stuck because of clearance issues hunting, or needed larger tires for the rocky trails I was running. I understand the fun/hobby aspect of building rigs as I also have a SOA FJ55 that is ridiculously huge, but personally I like building a rig as you find you are lacking in something. This tends to avoid overbuilding.
That makes perfect sense to me. As you USED your rig, you found out what was lacking and needed and made adjustments along the way. It's the guys who overbuild from the start not really knowing what they need. I think I said earlier in this thread, I found all I needed for my use was to remove the running boards. I bought my rig used and it had a fresh set of C load AT tires. When they finally wore enough to be replaced, I put on a set of E load KO2's. That's it. I tend to avoid serious 4x4 trails (although where I live and travel, fulltime 4x4 is a good thing) and this rig is my daily driver. The stock rig uses P load 275/70/16 tires but the AT's that came on the rig were 265/75/16 so I had a 1/4" lift already. ;) I've stuck with the 265/75 size.

https://www.tacomaworld.com/tirecalc?tires=275-70r16-265-75r16
 
#41
There are definitely two camps on this. The ones who modify because it looks cool and they "think" they must have it and they have the money but haven't actually gone out and found out whether or not they "need" all the mods and then there is those who find the limits of a stock set-up then modify to cure those shortcomings. Then there are the catagories of built not bought for each.
In 1980 I got my 1979 ScoutII (yes I have had it for 38 years) and wheeled it bone stock for years then started slowly doing the latter. It was originally built, over many years, to do decently hard core trails in Colorado and Moab. So the lockers, low t-case gears, SOA, skidplates etc all got installed to fix/overcome issues associated with those types of trails. Then I got into the more remote exploration and kept the same platform just made changes to make staying out away from town easier, bigger fuel tank, fridge, dual batteries, solar etc. Then I use it for hunting also so it gets used for many different things. For most of my SE Utah desert exploring you really never need 4wd except for just a few yards
Stock rigs, especially these days with traction control can do a heck of a lot with just a better tire tread...just depends on what you want. Both camps are fine I just find a need before the mod.
Some people just love to tinker and build and add another gizmo because they are looking for their next project. I also fall into the category some too.

Depending on your definition of "stock" none of my vehicles 5 could be considered stock any longer.

Darrell
 
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#42
Many many off road vehicles since I started doing this back in the 70's.

Most vehicles I kept stock + tires. The rest just got tires and springs and occasionally, axle gears.

The body of these vehicles were often modified to accommodate sleeping, eating etc.

Amazing where you can go if you take your time and plan your path and are not either a rock crawler or a high speed traveler.

Some of us here enjoy camping/exloring. Some talking about it. We also have a batch of gear junkies and a big helping of folks who get theirs doing the actual build. You'll notice these folks build them up. Take a trip or two and then it is for sale and on to the next one.

Very broad the amount of hobbies that fit under this umbrella. Happily there is room for all of them. Keep enjoying.
 
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