Keeping it simple

#1
While I am totally a gear guy and would love to spend $$$$$ on my ride to get out to the sticks and just camp . The reality is and for most here I suspect we just don't have the bucks to do all that we want. I mean in the world of 175,000 off road trucks, 6000 - 9000 for an Ursa minor ( which I wish I could afford they are awesome) 900 for a refrigerator dual battery holder at 400 with outhe batteries. I think the whole idea has gotten away fom us. so I want to konw what you have used that is cheap and effective to accomlish your overland goals.

what have you built from scratch? what deals have you found?
 
#2
I went jeep. Both have an insane aftermarket. But I want to reach a little further so I am building it to be able to do some serious crawling to get to places a little more off the beat'n path if you would.
 

BCobe

Adventurer
#3
While I am totally a gear guy and would love to spend $$$$$ on my ride to get out to the sticks and just camp . The reality is and for most here I suspect we just don't have the bucks to do all that we want. I mean in the world of 175,000 off road trucks, 6000 - 9000 for an Ursa minor ( which I wish I could afford they are awesome) 900 for a refrigerator dual battery holder at 400 with outhe batteries. I think the whole idea has gotten away fom us. so I want to konw what you have used that is cheap and effective to accomlish your overland goals.

what have you built from scratch? what deals have you found?
I buy used when I can but if I cant find what I want, then I will buy it outright. Got a tubeless AEV, winch plate, and skid all for 300 bucks. Its not perfect but honestly, it will do.

I do agree that the prices of things have gotten excessive, or maybe I just never realized it. I feel like certain things are like the "milspec" craze. Someone slaps the word "overlander or overlanding" on it and then hike the price up. Other companies I feel have created a name for themselves in the industry and charge prices to reflect that. Certain ones could be the R&D or better materials or manufacturing processes that they employ.

EDIT: I was of the mindset that certain names denote high quality. This may be 100% true but I have shifted that mindset and have looked at other products or manufactures of that same part or piece of kit.
 
#4
There are some things you just can't cheap out on. But, plenty of other things you can.
Like BCobe does, I try to buy used when possible. Also, I try to build it if possible too. That said it's not always worth building it once you factor in you time and any tools you need to purchase to complete the build.
Certain things I will purchase new because that way I know they haven't been abused. If I buy new, I don't purchase anything unless it's on sale for a good price and/or I've exhausted research for what's a good value.
Purchased a warn winch the other day on sale as well as warn has a rebate program on right now. Not a top of the line model but for as much as I will used it, it will suffice.
Bought a couple flood/spot lights on eBay.
I would love to add "overlander" to my resume but truth is I just like bombing down logging roads and camping away from other people. Don't need all that much to do that.
 
#5
That is how I am too. For instance my battery is the best I could find but the rock sliders were on sale. My biggest conundrum is sleeping arrangements. Right now it is tent on the ground but honestly that sucks roof top tents imho are too heavy and too expensive so while I would love an Ursa Minor. Not happening what does that leave me with ? Sleep in the jeep unless I can figure something else out
 

BCobe

Adventurer
#6
That is how I am too. For instance my battery is the best I could find but the rock sliders were on sale. My biggest conundrum is sleeping arrangements. Right now it is tent on the ground but honestly that sucks roof top tents imho are too heavy and too expensive so while I would love an Ursa Minor. Not happening what does that leave me with ? Sleep in the jeep unless I can figure something else out
I have wanted an RTT but I have decided against it due to having 2 dogs that like to do potty runs in the early AM. I have a 2 door so sleeping inside is possible just won't be the most comfortable. Even with a 4 door I could see a problem when the whole gang comes along. Resisting the urge to follow the trend of what everyone else is doing, I will be sticking to a ground tent. Even then, ground tents can get pretty pricey.
 

Happy Joe

Apprentice Geezer
#7
I, coming from the DIY world before catalog builds; feel that many people forget (or are unwilling to acquire) the skills necessary to build/modify their own vehicles and accessories. This can very often be done at the same quality/safety level (or better) than purchased parts, and often cheaper.
Getting an older used vehicle then upgrading it can give all of the off road capabilities (and more) that many new vehicle have at a substantial savings...If a person has the skills.
IMO, time to acquire skills is spent once, as is the cost of good tools.
Once acquired they both pay back dividends in cost savings and satisfaction. (In my experience you can spend money to have the work done (often at poor quality level) or use the same money to both acquire the tools and do the work; and have the tools ready for the next job).

... its all a matter of justification/self gratification (excuses why not are easy to come up with), and fabrication/maintenance is not for every one.

Recently for example I spent $40 for a set of used springs that would cost near $300 new without installation and spent an hour installing them (I already have the skills and tools; relatively few required).
If I decide to put 33X12.50 tires on the Jeep I can spend more than $1K (plus labor) on just the packaged lift spring kit (more than this would be necessary) or on the order of $200 on new, individual, springs and do it myself (done it many times so its not a big deal for me).
Re-geared the Explorer for, I believe, less than $200 (both axles) where I would expect the same job (to be done poorly, then have to be redone by me) would cost more than, or right at $1k per axle at a local shop.

..It all up the individual , though, what they want to spend their time/money doing...

Enjoy!
 
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#8
There's the (not-so-old) adage: Different strokes for different folks. There are those that want to be seen and those that do not..... Those that (do) like to be seen (Lemmings) and those that prefer not to be seen, but to experience places within their financial and time constraints.

I have gone though most of those cycles.

Since 1964 to present.

Most of each phase I went through was mostly driven by the crowd I associated with. I think I've gone full circle though.

I'm now no longer impressed with product name recognition or what my piers have. However, various products associated with quality bridge that thinking, but that's mostly on selected mechanical parts.

Many "overlander-wantnabe's" don't have the ability (money or otherwise) to meet their wants or needs.

The hard part is figuring out what you can realistically make or get by with without putting your "overlanding" (I dislike that term, by the way) experience into an unwanted / unneeded experience.

It's totally a personal choice.
 

BCobe

Adventurer
#9
Re-geared the Explorer for, I believe, less than $200 (both axles) where I would expect the same job (to be done poorly, then have to be redone by me) would cost more than, or right at $1k per axle at a local shop.
$200 for both axles! 1 Set of JK Gears is that! I do agree with doing things yourself. I have done everything myself except mount my tires. If I could fab, then I probably would have fabricated a rear bumper, I do like the looks of AEV plus the price was great so I would have bought that otherwise.

A regear around me was about 600 per axle. I took that $1200 and invested in the tools and time. It was a pain to do but we shall see how they hold up.
 
#10
It looks like a CO page. Nobody has touched any of my Jeeps in over 40 years other than a tire shop. Half of the tire shop crew has to come out to look at them and tell me about their old Jeeps. I used to have access to the equipment years ago to change tires. If I wanted to drive around I had to be able to fix it. Just how I am. Yes, I did work in a Jeep shop for a while.
 

Happy Joe

Apprentice Geezer
#11
$200 for both axles! 1 Set of JK Gears is that! I do agree with doing things yourself. I have done everything myself except mount my tires. If I could fab, then I probably would have fabricated a rear bumper, I do like the looks of AEV plus the price was great so I would have bought that otherwise.

A regear around me was about 600 per axle. I took that $1200 and invested in the tools and time. It was a pain to do but we shall see how they hold up.
Way to go!
Rear 8.8 axle complete with 4.10s and a shot limited slip ~$125... front, D35 IFS, 4.10 geared, housing & carrier ~ 75$, had the shims and spent roughly 1800 on the lockers (new couldn't find used).... tools left over from decades ago.

Mounting tires by hand is for youngsters ($20 gets me four changed at the local Big-O).
...might be time to invest in a welding class at the local community college... MIG welders are relatively easy to weld with an, a good grinder and sawsall/plasma cutter and you are pretty well set to fab...

Of course you can also do small projects like a 35 AH, sealed, deep discharge battery (not enough for a fridge, but easy to carry/transport) and a cheap Harbor freight inverter for camp lighting and electricity...(way better than any lantern, IMO, and works great with 110volt LED bulbs in lamps, at home, during power outages).
Salvage yard frame mounted tow hooks; those on the back of the Jeep came off a Suburban and the bolts and holes even line up.... an old Jeep tow bar supplied the 1/2" steel for spacers...
A (20% stretch minimum) snatch strap instead of a winch (to keep the vehicle lighter) ... lockers, pretty much, eliminate the need for a winch on less than extreme trails (driver skill dependent), IMO.
...current project; cram a chinese compressor (tsunami 1050; can't really recommend them due to design issues) into a .30 caliber (small) ammo can... replaces the worn out/retired Coleman compressor from the 1980s...
Enjoy!
 
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BCobe

Adventurer
#12
...might be time to invest in a welding class at the local community college... MIG welders are relatively easy to weld with an, a good grinder and sawsall/plasma cutter and you are pretty well set to fab...
I toom a welding class in HS but have often considered taking one up at a CC. Maybr after my current slew of classes are done.

I went the winch route for now since I got it used with synthetic line.

Sent from my SM-G935V using Tapatalk
 
#14
I make as much as I can myself, and don't shy away from a little labor. I also spend money on the things that I deem worthy of spending money on...but I'm a tight wad. Tires and parts are about the only thing I buy "new"

Bumpers can be cheaper if you're willing to weld yourself and have the ability. Even finding a friend or a facebook group you can get someone to weld something cheaper than buying pre-fabbed sometimes.

Also, figuring out what is REALLY needed is key...fridges/freezers are awesome, but do you really need ice cream overlanding? Nothing wrong with a cheap cooler and ice with some lunchmeat in it.
 
#15
While I am totally a gear guy and would love to spend $$$$$ on my ride to get out to the sticks and just camp . The reality is and for most here I suspect we just don't have the bucks to do all that we want. I mean in the world of 175,000 off road trucks, 6000 - 9000 for an Ursa minor ( which I wish I could afford they are awesome) 900 for a refrigerator dual battery holder at 400 with outhe batteries. I think the whole idea has gotten away fom us. so I want to konw what you have used that is cheap and effective to accomlish your overland goals.

what have you built from scratch? what deals have you found?
I did spend a decent amount of money building my Jeep but as far as gear:

I go simple but I am a weekend warrior not a true "overlander". I will take some good brauts or sausages (frozen) for the first night, they I keep them in a small collapsible ice jest with no ice. They will be thawed by the first night. After that just canned, MREs or other non perishable foods and allot of individually bottled water. I stash the water wherever I can. You can get those little flavor packs or bring oranges or lemons to flavor you water and eat. Bananas are also good. I don't bring a cooler.

I live in the woods and there is no issue my way for collecting and burning wood. I can dig a hole for a restroom. I don't need to bring fire wood. I try to in box what I can so save trash. I bring cotton balls soaked in Vaseline for a fire starter. They will burn even in the rain. I bring a tent big enough to stand in and a cots and a tarp with bungee cords for shelter, I do bring chairs. I bring just more than enough clothes. For sleeping bags I take two lighter one, my son has a medium weight one but we take feet/hand warmers to through in the bags when its cold. This is packed for three days with for my son and I.

backrack.jpg
packed.jpg
 
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