KTM 950 Adventure: Expeditions West builds an ADV

Christian P.

Expedition Leader
Staff member
expeditionswest said:
I wouldn't care if it took me three hours to change an air filter (oh wait, it does)... The KTM 950 ADV is a bike molded from the depths of my own soul.

I cannot imagine owning and riding any other motorcycle, and likely never will.
I feel the same about mine but there is no doubt that it is more high-maintenance/expensive to maintain than a Japanese equivalent.

One thing that gets me is the special engine oil you have to put in. I think i paid like $10 for a quart last time...and I wonder what you do when you travel in Guatemala and can't find it.
 

RocKrawler

Supporting Sponsor
2aroundtheworld said:
I feel the same about mine but there is no doubt that it is more high-maintenance/expensive to maintain than a Japanese equivalent.

One thing that gets me is the special engine oil you have to put in. I think i paid like $10 for a quart last time...and I wonder what you do when you travel in Guatemala and can't find it.
Strap on an extra pack, take out a 2nd mortgage and bring some with you :wings:
 

SOAZ

Tim and Kelsey get lost..
expeditionswest said:
I wouldn't care if it took me three hours to change an air filter (oh wait, it does)... The KTM 950 ADV is a bike molded from the depths of my own soul.

I cannot imagine owning and riding any other motorcycle, and likely never will.

I got a chance to ride Scott's bike around on pavement. It is the most natural feeling bike to ride. Right off the bat I felt comfortable. The hardest part about riding it is keeping oneself in control. The urge to do highly illegal speeds is strong, VERY strong with this one!

Someday, one will sit in my garage. :jumping:
 

RHINO

Expedition Leader
805gregg said:
I followed a KTM 950 through some serious sand he had knobbies I had Tourance on my DL1000. He had no camping gear, I had the whole deal. He couldn't make it through the last sand wash. I could and hit him when he stopped right in front of me.

i had a similar experience,, i was riding my ol' ducati e900, he was on a DL1000. i had to stop several times with nothing to do but have lunch waiting for the poor bugger. the trail we rode was waaay to much for the guy and maybe the bike.

but there is a morale to your story, dont follow too close the rider in front of you.
 

traveltoad

Aaron S
SOAZ said:
I got a chance to ride Scott's bike around on pavement. It is the most natural feeling bike to ride. Right off the bat I felt comfortable. The hardest part about riding it is keeping oneself in control. The urge to do highly illegal speeds is strong, VERY strong with this one!

Someday, one will sit in my garage. :jumping:
Self control is SO over rated!
 

SOAZ

Tim and Kelsey get lost..
Well, thats it. My brother just bot a KTM 950. An 07 I think. Its all over for me as the thought of him riding it makes me want one even worse.

Put a lock on your bike Scott, I'm donning my black pajamas and ski cap now to stealthily slink my way to your house and ride away on your bike. Wait... when it starts it actually makes the earth shudder... People will notice that.
Better think this one out further.
 

SOAZ

Tim and Kelsey get lost..
Scott,
did you ever hook your I-phone up to the bike? My brother would like to do the same thing with his.
 

805gregg

Adventurer
RHINO said:
i had a similar experience,, i was riding my ol' ducati e900, he was on a DL1000. i had to stop several times with nothing to do but have lunch waiting for the poor bugger. the trail we rode was waaay to much for the guy and maybe the bike.

but there is a morale to your story, dont follow too close the rider in front of you.
I agree, I followed him because he was in front and I figured he could see the way ahead for the best line. I ended up with the wind knocked out of me and a broken rib, plus a bent pannier. When he stopped I went MMMM I was standing with my butt over my sleeping bag on the pillion seat, no time to hit the brakes and in sand you have to steer with your weight, I pushed left as hard as I could and I thought I cleared him but our pannies hit. My Tourtech aluminum was dented in about 6" and his HB Gobi had only a tiny dent. Big motorcycles are a handfull in loose sand, I don't like it.
 

Clutch

<---Pass
One thing that gets me is the special engine oil you have to put in. I think i paid like $10 for a quart last time...and I wonder what you do when you travel in Guatemala and can't find it.

Shell Rotella 15/40W $10 for a gallon...we have been running this in our race bikes for years, never a problem. If it can handle racing, it can handle cross country touring.:bike_rider:

They make in synthetic too.
 
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Jim1960

Observer
I have now outfitted my 990 so only the camp chair and a 1 Gal Rotopax are on the back rack (6 inches tall). I purchase front panniers from Aerostich http://www.aerostich.com/aerostich-tank-panniers.html and in them I pack the tent (minus the poles) and the ground mat (Big Agnes insulated aircore) along with a Cabellas emergency blanket with mesh for extra warmth over my BigAgnes 45F Yampa bag: http://www.bigagnes.com/Products/ProductFinder/Bag/filters/8 This bag crushes down to the size of a softball or jar of peanuts.
In my rear panniers (caribou Case) is my sleeping bag, tools, clothing and chow and cookware. When it's all packed up, I can easily swing my leg over the bike instead of climbing into it. The added bonus is there is virtually no extra top weight to make one tumble unexpectedly. Sorry no pics of the new set up yet.



My old set up. Good bye to the dry bag on top and replaced with a rotopax. The fellow in the pic is Dennis, a long time riding buddy of my fathers, Would you believe he's 6.5"!
 
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