Long Term Reliability of LR4

Mako1114

Adventurer
I’m looking for some information and advice from those with experience regarding the anticipated long term issues and associated cost of operating an LR4? I currently own a 2012 with 83K miles and I cannot decide if I should sell it or give it to my daughter as a first vehicle? My wife has owned the 2012 LR4 HSE since May of 2015 and it has been a great daily driver for her. We purchased the vehicle with 37K miles and immediately purchased a Z-series extended warranty through the local Land Rover dealership. The extended warranty turned out to be a smart move as the steering rack had issues within the first year of ownership and it was replaced under the extended warranty and the cost of the repairs basically offset the price of the warranty purchase. Since then the only other items that have been replaced are the front and rear brakes (rotors and pads), windshield - due to a rock chip and tires. We have also replaced filters and wiper blades but all these items are wearable items that require replacement on any vehicle.

We have recently purchased a 2019 Jeep Cherokee Trail Hawk for my wife as her daily commute has increased and she wanted something with better fuel economy and a smaller footprint for driving in town. As mentioned earlier, our daughter has just got her driver’s license, therefore we are looking for her first vehicle. I was dead set on selling the LR4 due to the high mileage, however after shopping around for an alternative vehicle within the same price range that I can sell the LR4 for, keeping it seems like a viable alternative. Am I setting myself up for major expenses? We have a local Rover mechanic who is much more cost effective than the local dealership, however i'd obviosuly rather not frequent his establishment. Thanks in advance for any helpful insight.

Cheers
 
Last edited:

vasily

Adventurer
We have a 2013 with 80k on the clock. Only regular maintenance with oil changes at half the recommended intervals.

Haven’t had any issues.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Colin Hughes

Explorer
How does your wife like the Trailhawk? I just traded a 2015 Cherokee Trailhawk in on a 2014 4Runner SR5 earlier this month. I had the Jeep for just over a year and coming from an LR3, was frustrated with the lack of useable cargo space, constantly hitting my head on the A pillar because of the severe angle, never could get comfortable in the seat and worries about the transmission (two software updates and it still shifted very harse on occasion). The Trailhawk gets very good fuel economy but so far, the 4Runner is only a couple of lts per 100 kms more on fuel mileage so I can't complain. I considered an LR4 and it would have been less than the 4Runner but I remember my last year of repairs for the LR3 and decided on the Toyota. I still have a 1998 Discovery that gives smiles per miles when I take it out for a drive. That said, your LR4 still doesn't have a ton of miles, my LR3 had around 360,000 kms on it when I bought the Jeep. Sometimes, better the devil you know ... :)
 

LR Max

Local Oaf
My dad has a 2010 LR4 with 120k on it. Going strong. They are heavy on maintenance (brakes and suspension are maintenance items!!) items, but you get what you pay for. Great vehicles. I'd keep it. It shares many components with the LR3s, and I'm hearing about LR3s at 300k still going strong.

For your wife, go look at a Hyundai Kona. Nice little cars and good mpg. Or any Hyundai. My Elantra GT has been a champion for my 50 mile/day commute. Super cheap to own and operate. Also 6 speed manual, so all of the fun. Elantras are cheap off lease/used. So even better considering its just going to get the crap beaten out of it. My mom has been in an Elantra for the past 10 years. Been awesome. They are the new "Honda Accord" of 2000. Not flashy but they'll do things...like keep working and be cheap.
 

Mako1114

Adventurer
So far my wife really likes the Trailhawk. She wanted to downsize so she likes the overall smaller stature, cargo space etc. She is getting 22mpg around town on 87 octane fuel so the economy is much better than the LR4. She has the V6 and I was interested in the 2.0L turbo, however they did not have an Elite model available in the color that she wanted. Having said that I really like the LR4 and if I knew it were as reliable as say a 4-Runner (which she used to have) i'd definitely keep it.

Cheers
 
I'm in a similar boat as that my eldest daughter will be car shopping soon. Personally, I'd stick with small, cheap and fuel efficient. (Corolla, Civic, Elantra etc)
 

Mako1114

Adventurer
I'm in a similar boat as that my eldest daughter will be car shopping soon. Personally, I'd stick with small, cheap and fuel efficient. (Corolla, Civic, Elantra etc)
Yeah, you're probably right. I can get a new Subaru Crosstrek for low 20s which would probably last her from now through college.

Cheers
 

Ray_G

Explorer
I think the LR4 will be fine in terms of reliability beyond consumables already noted.

Moreover, it's safe.
And presumably paid for or significantly paid off, with a known history.

So while smaller and efficient is good, the net costs may not be all that disparate.
r-
Ray
 
I think the LR4 will be fine in terms of reliability beyond consumables already noted.

Moreover, it's safe.
And presumably paid for or significantly paid off, with a known history.

So while smaller and efficient is good, the net costs may not be all that disparate.
r-
Ray
Even if the LR4 is paid for and a smaller more fuel efficient, easier to drive and less maintenance heavy vehicle with factory warranty can be had for the same amount the LR4 sells for....
 

Ray_G

Explorer
Even if the LR4 is paid for and a smaller more fuel efficient, easier to drive and less maintenance heavy vehicle with factory warranty can be had for the same amount the LR4 sells for....
Hypothetically yes, of course that all takes that commodity that nobody ever gets back: time.
Moreover, easier to drive is very relative...if someone thinks these are hard to drive I would be happy to let them roll my D1...or my S1. These things are cake to drive, have great turning radius, cruise well, etc.
I don't dwell on gas mileage...life is too short for that.

So basically it comes down to how one reconciles the idea of it being maintenance heavy. I think it's a bit overblown given the quality of the D3/D4 range (and the lower quality of some of the formerly renowned high reliability vehicles).

Oh, and then there is the safety...I get that crash ratings/testings are what they are, but right now my oldest is in a Mazda 3 her mom gave her...and I'd rather her be in a Rover.
 

Mako1114

Adventurer
All are valid points and worthy of consideration. Thankfully the LR4 is paid off and if we let it go and buy something else, I plan on staying within the budget of what I can sell the LR4. Of course my daughter really wants my 2005 LJUR with only 37K miles but that is not on the table. :)

Cheers
 
Hypothetically yes, of course that all takes that commodity that nobody ever gets back: time.
Moreover, easier to drive is very relative...if someone thinks these are hard to drive I would be happy to let them roll my D1...or my S1. These things are cake to drive, have great turning radius, cruise well, etc.
I'm thinking more in terms of a new driver. My daughter prefers driving our Tucson vs our F-150 due to the size.
I don't dwell on gas mileage...life is too short for that.

So basically it comes down to how one reconciles the idea of it being maintenance heavy. I think it's a bit overblown given the quality of the D3/D4 range (and the lower quality of some of the formerly renowned high reliability vehicles).
Maintenance on any 2012 vehicle with 83K regardless of make or model will likely be higher than a brand new warranty covered car.
Oh, and then there is the safety...I get that crash ratings/testings are what they are, but right now my oldest is in a Mazda 3 her mom gave her...and I'd rather her be in a Rover.
See responses in red.
 

merr1ca

Member
I'm at 130k on mine and she's been pretty stout. Expect to do the following things over the next few years:

-Control Arm's
-Air Compressor
-Alternator
-Cooling system. Mainly the waterpump, T-stat and that little cross pipe that goes under the intake.

Honestly, nothing crazy for a car with 100k miles. She's been better than most of my Benz's/Audi's and even my Subarus.

She's also going to be way safer in that LR4 than anything else you can buy for sub $20k.
 

Mako1114

Adventurer
I'm at 130k on mine and she's been pretty stout. Expect to do the following things over the next few years:

-Control Arm's
-Air Compressor
-Alternator
-Cooling system. Mainly the waterpump, T-stat and that little cross pipe that goes under the intake.

Honestly, nothing crazy for a car with 100k miles. She's been better than most of my Benz's/Audi's and even my Subarus.

She's also going to be way safer in that LR4 than anything else you can buy for sub $20k.
Thanks for all of the information and advice. I am happy to report that we have decided to keep the LR4 for my daughter and will just perform as much preventative maintenance as possible and deal with any larger issues as they arise. When I started to shop for its replacement it became clear that there is not much available in the 15K-18K price range that is as safe, capable, comfortable, etc. as the LR4.

Cheers
 

errwik

New member
I got rid of mine when it went past 100,000. The cost of the timing chain replacement was just too flippin high for me to justify. I loved it, it was a great truck but I missed having a Jeep.
 
Top