Looking at Suzuki V-Strom 650

Michael Brown

Adventurer
I am new to motorcycles, but not to offroading. I currently have a Montero, but it isn't the best on gas or for transporting just me. I started looking at adventure bikes because I like the idea of traveling to the mountains for a day or two and being able to explore an interesting dirt path that I may come across.

After looking at some KTM's, I decided against it. They are extremely capable, but command a high price for it. Also I am new to riding bikes, so a learning bike would be great. I like the Vstrom models for the price and there are 2 nearby for sale. One is cheaper with 34,000 miles and completely stock. The other has dual sport tires, crash bars, and a skid plate. With only 11,000 miles the second one is nicer, but more expensive. I am trying to get an idea on what I should look for to compare these 2 more.

Would it be better to buy cheaper and put the accessories on, or just get the equipped bike with lower miles?

http://greenville.craigslist.org/mcy/3592881146.html

http://greenville.craigslist.org/mcy/3589374636.html

Any other thoughts are appreciated.:)
 

camodog

Adventurer
I too am looking a Wee Strom. I am approved and just waiting on the dealer to come off some of their ridculous prices.
I am hoping to have a deal worked out by the end of the week.

If they dont come through for me, I would be happy with a used one. The 08 with 11k miles is a good deal

Good luck to you and happy riding.
 

jkam

nomadic man
Between those two, I'd take the less expensive one considering it's your first bike.
The Wee Strom is a great bike and it will provide many pleasurable smiles for you to enjoy.
They are very reliable, I had an 04 model that I put over 85,000 miles on with minimal drama.
Keep the additions to less is better as you will probably drop it when learning how to ride it.
After you have some miles on you, then decide if it is the right bike for you.
 

Frank

Explorer
All of the above is true. Would I ride one off-road, no.

1) it doesn't have spoked wheels (typically weaker)
2) it doesn't have a 21" front wheel
3) the exhaust is begging to be destroyed
4) it has low ground clearance and suspension travel

That said, people off-road them all of the time. Search around ADV, you will find out real quick what guys do with them. Scott provided an excellent video to prove me wrong. lol

IMO, there are better solutions for the same $$. A KLR and a XR650 both come to mind real quick. Easy to ride both on and off road (I dont know that I would want to spend days at a time on a XR), cheap to maintain, great on gas, easy and cheap to modify, etc. etc. and can be had for what you have listed on the CL posts. For a few more $$, you could be on a BMW or even a new Husqvarna.
 
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jkam

nomadic man
Depending on what the OP wants to do with the bike would help me give better advise.

I took my wee Strom to many places it probably shouldn't have gone but it was what I was riding and it got me there. Sure I abused it, but was amazed at how well it handled the abuse. It handled Copper Canyon, Baja and was just delightful when having to slab it or on the twistys climbing up a mountain pass with plenty of power, even loaded up with full Jesse luggage.
A KLR or similar wouldn't be as versatile.

Being this will be his first bike, going cheap is always wise. He might not like it after awhile and won't be out too much. Then he can try again and eventually will find what works for him. It can be a fun experience finding the right bike for your wants and needs.
 

Scott Brady

Founder
IMO, there are better solutions for the same $$. A KLR and a XR650 both come to mind real quick.
I think your suggestion of the KLR is a good one, particularly the older models. Not sure the XR650 is a good idea for nearly any pavement use. We have an XR650 and it is an implement of torture on the pavement.

The KLR is compelling. I have seen more of those bikes on major trips than any other (with the BMW Dakar 650 next in popularity).

However, if he will be spending most of the time on the pavement, the ABS V-Strom 650 is brilliant for the new rider. Stable, smooth, safe and reasonably powerful for the highway. That little twin is a gem. That bike really impressed me.
 

sourdough

Adventurer
I am new to motorcycles, but not to offroading. I currently have a Montero, but it isn't the best on gas or for transporting just me. I started looking at adventure bikes because I like the idea of traveling to the mountains for a day or two and being able to explore an interesting dirt path that I may come across.

After looking at some KTM's, I decided against it. They are extremely capable, but command a high price for it. Also I am new to riding bikes, so a learning bike would be great. I like the Vstrom models for the price and there are 2 nearby for sale. One is cheaper with 34,000 miles and completely stock. The other has dual sport tires, crash bars, and a skid plate. With only 11,000 miles the second one is nicer, but more expensive. I am trying to get an idea on what I should look for to compare these 2 more.

Would it be better to buy cheaper and put the accessories on, or just get the equipped bike with lower miles?

http://greenville.craigslist.org/mcy/3592881146.html

http://greenville.craigslist.org/mcy/3589374636.html

Any other thoughts are appreciated.:)
I really enjoyed my years dual sport riding. Owned many small D/S bikes 250's and 350's and then a 650KLR. The 650KLR was a pig. My last D/S was a DRZ400S which I liked more than any of the fifteen other motorcycles I owned over 40 years. I'm affraid the Wee would be a pig offroad.
 

Michael Brown

Adventurer
Thanks for all of the advice. To help Jkam with more of an idea of my personal use. I would most likely spend all of my time on pavement with minimal offroad. Scott's video definately makes me feel confident in the performance of the bike. And cost is a large factor. From my signature you can see that I already have several vehicles to take care of and I get alot of joy from racing my cars in the Southeast. My brother and father both have cruisers (Harley and Kawasaki Vulcan), but they don't really suit my taste. I will be moving to within an hour drive of the Appalachians in TN and NC. I wanted something that I can easily maintain, cruise with the other bikes, but still have a sport feel in the mountain roads. I also like the idea of not being limited by the terrain if I really wanted to go somewhere after I was comfortable with the bike.
 

Mechanical

Adventurer
Thanks for all of the advice. To help Jkam with more of an idea of my personal use. I would most likely spend all of my time on pavement with minimal offroad. Scott's video definately makes me feel confident in the performance of the bike. And cost is a large factor. From my signature you can see that I already have several vehicles to take care of and I get alot of joy from racing my cars in the Southeast. My brother and father both have cruisers (Harley and Kawasaki Vulcan), but they don't really suit my taste. I will be moving to within an hour drive of the Appalachians in TN and NC. I wanted something that I can easily maintain, cruise with the other bikes, but still have a sport feel in the mountain roads. I also like the idea of not being limited by the terrain if I really wanted to go somewhere after I was comfortable with the bike.
It sounds like the Suzuki is right up your ally. Possibly a used BMW F650. From what you have said I would definitely recommend the Wee over a KLR. You will appreciate the extra power when trying to keep up with the cruisers.
 

jkam

nomadic man
Michael.

Thanks for clarifying your needs.

The 07 with 34,500 miles (which most consider high) but not me, would be a good place to start.
Since it is considered high mileage you should be able to negotiate the price down some, maybe a few
hundred and then it would be a good deal and allow you to get some goodies you want to add.

Hope you find one you like and have many years of safe travels.

Best regards.
 

Frank

Explorer
From what you have said I would definitely recommend the Wee over a KLR. You will appreciate the extra power when trying to keep up with the cruisers.
I agree with this 100%. The low power on the highway is why I sold my KLR. I enjoyed the KLR in the gravel/on dirt roads and my suspension made riding the twisties enjoyable.

I read your first post that you wanted a dual sport that could ride the highway, not a highway bike that could run the dirt. (2 different bikes in my opinion)

Of the two bikes you have listed, get the one that has the crash bars and skid plate. -or be ready to spend the money on this gear should you decide on the other bike.

Don't forget that the cheap part of motorcycling is the bike. Invest in a good helmet and gear as well. Ride with the mindset that you will crash and every car is out to kill you.

Oh, and be ready for an experience like no-other. Motorcycling is amazing. You will go places and meet people you never would do in a vehicle.
 
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