M416 or start from scratch?

Red Crow

New member
After MANY hours on here and many other website I am finally starting an adventure/camping trailer build. I bought an M416 trailer with the idea of having someone build me an aluminum lid put a RTT on it and start camping in it. Well the guy that I submitted my plans to never panned out. So, almost two years later I decided to build one myself, but out of steel. I bought myself a welder and am in the process of purchasing the material. I settled on 1x.065 tubing for the lid frame, 1 1/2"x1/8 angle to trim the rim and 14 or 16 gauge sheet metal for the skin. I am going to purchase a 3,500# axle with e-brakes and a p3 controller with rims and tires that match my FJ. My question is, for those of you who have spent the time and money repainting, building up your M416s to suit your off-road needs. Do you feel it would have been better to have just started from scratch?

Thanks
 

Red Crow

New member
Ah hell. Guess I decided. I had 2 M416 trailers and was selling one of them. Guy came to look at the one I was going to sell. Ended up selling both to him. Guess I am going to start from scratch.
 

sroth

Fabricator
After MANY hours on here and many other website I am finally starting an adventure/camping trailer build. I bought an M416 trailer with the idea of having someone build me an aluminum lid put a RTT on it and start camping in it. Well the guy that I submitted my plans to never panned out. So, almost two years later I decided to build one myself, but out of steel. I bought myself a welder and am in the process of purchasing the material. I settled on 1x.065 tubing for the lid frame, 1 1/2"x1/8 angle to trim the rim and 14 or 16 gauge sheet metal for the skin. I am going to purchase a 3,500# axle with e-brakes and a p3 controller with rims and tires that match my FJ. My question is, for those of you who have spent the time and money repainting, building up your M416s to suit your off-road needs. Do you feel it would have been better to have just started from scratch?

Thanks
We found out the hard way that building from scratch is lighter and cheaper. Your not adding extra metal to the M416 to support add-ons.
 

M35A2

Tinkerer
Here is my personal opinion:

If you want a nice, general purpose trailer that you can load out any way you want as needed, go with an M416. A few add-ons are all right but don't pimp it out.

Because if you need a pimped-out trailer, build from scratch or start with something newer.

The supply of 416s is drying up so why cut one all up just because your use case demands a lot of custom fittings?

That's how I feel about it, anyway.
 

tgreening

Expedition Leader
Here is my personal opinion:

If you want a nice, general purpose trailer that you can load out any way you want as needed, go with an M416. A few add-ons are all right but don't pimp it out.

Because if you need a pimped-out trailer, build from scratch or start with something newer.

The supply of 416s is drying up so why cut one all up just because your use case demands a lot of custom fittings?

That's how I feel about it, anyway.


This right here. If you can be happy with adding a few bits n bobs an M-416 is hard to beat.


If you end up adding 4x the mass you started with so you can have racks, mounts, cans, bottles, boxes, batteries, swimming pools and disco balls, you might as well start from scratch because odds are once you end up with all the above just about everything original is gone anyway.
 

tarditi

Explorer
This right here. If you can be happy with adding a few bits n bobs an M-416 is hard to beat.


If you end up adding 4x the mass you started with so you can have racks, mounts, cans, bottles, boxes, batteries, swimming pools and disco balls, you might as well start from scratch because odds are once you end up with all the above just about everything original is gone anyway.
You write as if a disco ball is OPTIONAL...

The M416 and M100 are simple 500# trailers. It carries a little stuff very, very well - once you start really modifying it for overlanding you will quickly hit a point where you would have been better off with a different platform - the 4x6 tub has some drawbacks in it's design since it was designed to be a floating light trailer with canvas cover - not a hard-shell, sealed tailgate RTT platform. Once you replace all the "small military trailer" things that limit your design, you're not left with much... especially if faced with rehabbing a craigslist trailer just to get rolling.

If I had to do it all over again, I would probably build from a different platform - probably a dinoot setup, but that said, it's sort of like a trusty dog - it will often endear itself to you more than just the intrinsic value. I've laughed away several offers to buy it from me - some quite serious.
 

Flat_Ernie

Observer
If I was needing a trailer again, I would make the frame and start with a truck bed. I was even able to match the style of my tow vehicle, post # 82 here ....http://www.expeditionportal.com/forum/threads/65308-show-us-your-truck-bed-trailers/page9?highlight=sourdough
Ugh..you cut up a Willys truck bed. :(

But, I agree with you - starting with something else and building a frame is likely a better proposition. I'm looking into service/utility/tool box beds...already have many compartments and can be done just like any other bed...

EDIT: Just saw this:

http://www.expeditionportal.com/forum/threads/65308-show-us-your-truck-bed-trailers?p=934956#post934956
 
Last edited:

Red Crow

New member
I saw an aluminum dog trailer that I thought would be a good starting platform. Could have used the different compartments for gear. Had a flat top with a rack and had a built in water tank. I think it is going to be a bit of work, but it will be what I want in the end.
 
Top