MB 1120 Coming to America!

Jonturgeon

Observer
Well... along with DIY cabinets the cushions may very well end up also being DIY. I have the sewing machine (a Sailrite that is tough enough to make sails) but not much in the way of skill with it. The backrest idea might just work, though I was hoping to make cushions that are not flat. Our boat cushions (we had them made) have a 2 part back so they look more like a home couch than a single piece of foam. Below is what I would like to make (not the leather, the design, this is not our boat), but may not have the skill (this is likely).

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Sitec

Adventurer
From past experience if you are not convinced you can do it, it's worth paying someone to do it... Having seen your woodwork/interior skills I'm envious, you are very good at it, and I can see why you wanted to do it... Looking brilliant so far. Me, I like my metalwork and fabrication, so I'll widen and fit out our body (and with a bit of luck it will turn out nicely, but I will be using bought cabinetry and enlisting the help of a kitchen maker to help make it all work. I've also found a local upholsterer who will make cushions to fit the seating area I've built, as I know I dont have the upholstery skills and patience or time to do it! :)
 

Jonturgeon

Observer
My dad was a custom home builder so learned what I know about wood working when I was younger (lucky given my current life). Now metal work... I never spent enough time in my uncle's garage who was a mechanic and welder. As far as being a seamster, well I have bumbled a bit with sailboat canvas and doing the small interior cushions in our 13' tow behind. I also have a friend in town that I might be able to beg her for some guidance. I can agree though about patience and the amount that is needed and will likely give it a shot, if I mess it up then i'll hire it done (sort of my way of doing new things).

Anyway, got the water tank muscled into place today. IT FITS! So we pulled it back out and bonded in a small bulkhead and painted it (will not be able to do this once the tank is in). So, tomorrow the goal is to get the tank back in and bond it in place. Heather also did a bunch more painting/varnishing in the bedroom.
 

Sitec

Adventurer
Yup, know that feeling. Have a go at it yourself. :)

Re the tank, as it's inside I'd be slow to bond it in... Could you sit it on foam, and have foam supports around the outside and have the lid pin it in there? If you have any future issues (contamination/leaks etc), if it's bonded in you'll never get it out without destroying something.... I've been pondering our tanks... (inside or out, stainless or plastic, round or square etc etc)... I then remembered I have a large cylindrical stainless tank that's 700mm x 1400mm. It's going outside between the chassis rails at the rear. It'll have to be very cold to freeze 500 lt of water! :). Great build so far!!
 

luthj

Adventurer
One option to secure the tank with ability to remove is as follows.

Take plastic bags, and place them in the gaps around the tank (2" gaps are ideal). Mix some slow expansion 2 part urethane foam. Pour the foam into the bags, and let them expand to fill the space. The bags prevent the foam from bonding to the tank/cabinet, and they provide firm support to keep the tank in place. If removal is required the foam can be cut and pulled out (re-used if needed).

A similar approach is used to package large items for shipping. Such as this product.
https://www.amazon.com/Instapak-Quick-Bag/dp/B0185R54KK
 

Jonturgeon

Observer
One option to secure the tank with ability to remove is as follows.

Take plastic bags, and place them in the gaps around the tank (2" gaps are ideal). Mix some slow expansion 2 part urethane foam. Pour the foam into the bags, and let them expand to fill the space. The bags prevent the foam from bonding to the tank/cabinet, and they provide firm support to keep the tank in place. If removal is required the foam can be cut and pulled out (re-used if needed).

A similar approach is used to package large items for shipping. Such as this product.
https://www.amazon.com/Instapak-Quick-Bag/dp/B0185R54KK
That is a great idea and I will likely do that! I had been thinking about using the spray expanding foam but did not want it to stick to the walls and tank. A few cans of it should be plenty as the tank fits pretty well inside the hole. The structure above the tank will be bonded in, making it more difficult to remove the tank if need be. The problem is trying to weigh out a possible problem with making sure it will not move if the truck ever ends up in its side (man I hope not). With the boat we tried to do this but it is pretty difficult to be 100%.
 

luthj

Adventurer
Note that the one part foam often found in cans at home stores requires moisture to cure properly. So the bags have to be left open and only two or 3 inches of foam injected at once. The two part foams often used in boats modelmaking etc don't require air/moisture to cure.
 

Iain_U1250

Explorer
That is a great idea and I will likely do that! I had been thinking about using the spray expanding foam but did not want it to stick to the walls and tank. A few cans of it should be plenty as the tank fits pretty well inside the hole. The structure above the tank will be bonded in, making it more difficult to remove the tank if need be. The problem is trying to weigh out a possible problem with making sure it will not move if the truck ever ends up in its side (man I hope not). With the boat we tried to do this but it is pretty difficult to be 100%.
I would fabricate a metal tie down, 400lt of water will weigh 400kg, and that is a huge load to have moving around the cabin if you even turn over - just think of the damage it will do if it ever came loose. Everything in our truck is secured when we travel, including the stuff we have on the bed. We have gotten airborne more than once, and so far nothing has ever broken or come loose.

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I would be careful using the foam around panel work, it expands and can create a lot of pressure if confined - doesn't take much to pop a seam or bow out a panel. You also need the closed cell foam, the single spray can type will turn hold water, and then rust anything in contact with it. Water fittings will eventually leak, even if just a bit, no matter how careful you are and as long as the are around your tank is vented, you won't have a problem, but if the moisture cannot evaporate, then things will rust.
 
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Iain_U1250

Explorer
Yup, know that feeling. Have a go at it yourself. :)

Re the tank, as it's inside I'd be slow to bond it in... Could you sit it on foam, and have foam supports around the outside and have the lid pin it in there? If you have any future issues (contamination/leaks etc), if it's bonded in you'll never get it out without destroying something.... I've been pondering our tanks... (inside or out, stainless or plastic, round or square etc etc)... I then remembered I have a large cylindrical stainless tank that's 700mm x 1400mm. It's going outside between the chassis rails at the rear. It'll have to be very cold to freeze 500 lt of water! :). Great build so far!!
HI Simon, the whole tank won't freeze overnight just because it is on the outside, as you say it is too big for a couple of nights at -5C, but the little outlet hose will, and then you have no water. A week at -15C and it will be frozen, but luckily you don't really get that cold down in Adelaide :)
 

Grenadiers

Adventurer
Our Truma Combi E furnace/water heater, has a valve that opens at 3 degrees Celsius (37F) and drains the entire system and including the water tank. Something to think about.
 

Jonturgeon

Observer
Our Truma Combi E furnace/water heater, has a valve that opens at 3 degrees Celsius (37F) and drains the entire system and including the water tank. Something to think about.
Anyone know what this valve is and where to get one? Sounds like it might be a good idea if it is not too complex to install.

And this shows how dedicated Heather is. The weather has started to warm a bit!
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DiploStrat

Expedition Leader
Anyone know what this valve is and where to get one? Sounds like it might be a good idea if it is not too complex to install.
...
Jon,

The Webasto Dual Top offers two options.

-- When off, a purge at 45F is automatic. While this protects the Dual Top, it does nothing for the water in the rest of the camper.

-- There is a "Frost Protect" mode. This must be selected, but basically, the unit is off until the temp drops to 45F, the the unit comes on in hot air mode, warming the entire camper to at least 45F.

As it costs at least5 $25 to buy enough anti-freeze for our 917, I top up the diesel tank and leave it in Frost Protect.

It may be easier for you to cobble up an auto on function than to try to arrange a drain that will really drain EVERYTHING. As Iain noted, it ain't the big tanks that ya gotta worry about. ;-)
 

luthj

Adventurer
If using a purge valve, take note that automatic water pumps will run continuously, and can overheating or damage themselves once the tank is emptied.
 

Jonturgeon

Observer
Ok, thanks for the info on the cold weather freshwater protection. When I get closer to the plumbing I will look closely at the options.

We have been at work and have now gotten the water tank in place and the top rails bonded in (still need to pad the outside edges, it can't move much but any is too much). Also I had a few minutes (ok, well over an hour, cutting the composite panel took a bit) so I installed the first heat exchanger (Kuba VA 200) for the Webasto. Also fit in the hinges (they are flush on the top) on the left floor panel, waiting for a 2" forstner bit to install the stainless pulls.
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And as of today we bonded in the kitchen counter splash guard. It is 1/2" acrylic and forms a bit of wall to support the upper cabinets (hindsite, the clear plastic will probably drive us crazy keeping it clean, but it does allow more light and a less closed in feel). I used a router with a carbide bit to cut the acrylic. The cabinet will continue forward, that is on the docket for tomorrow.
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